Tag Archives: James C. Sherlock

Virginia Must Ensure Transgender Medical Treatment Is Safe

by James C. Sherlock

Attorney Hans Bader and I in parallel articles have pointed out the serious questions posed by national and international experts about current medical practices in gender transitions for minors.

Those questions include both the ethics of the diagnosis and treatment processes in use and the safety of the puberty blockers and cross-gender hormones used in those treatments. Hormone treatments are administered to hundreds of minors annually in Virginia in the face of both new FDA warnings and other major open questions about their safety and long-term outcomes.

Virginia taxpayers pay for a lot of these treatments in state hospitals and clinics with state-funded private insurance plans and now Medicaid.

I will recommend the Virginia Secretary of Health and Human Resources organize and oversee practice and research networks in Virginia that mirror the recommendations of the Cass Review in the U.K. to make it safe.

Virginia has the assets necessary to carry out those recommendations and the state has the authority. It must demonstrate the will.

No new law appears necessary. Continue reading

Progressive Dogma Untethered to Results – Voter Laws Edition

by James C. Sherlock

The armies of the progressive left are what the great political scientist George Edwards called “Prisoners of Their Premises.” Many persons and institutions are captives, to a greater or lesser degree.

Lesser is better in this case. Mistakes flow from the best of intentions. You can learn from them or repeat them.

The United States military late in the Vietnam war mandated and then made a science out of analyzing its mistakes in order to learn from them.

At the unit level, soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines debrief after every training and combat mission. At higher levels the reviews are periodic, but also professionally honest. Combat training schools capture, but do not enshrine those lessons. Because there is always a next time, newer equipment, newer force compositions, newer enemies and newer lessons.

It is the only way to improve systematically.

Many progressives, in solitary confinement with their dogma, are often wrong but always certain. When their policy prescriptions fail to provide the predicted results, which is most of the time, outcomes are ignored or blamed on outside factors beyond their control. Core beliefs, unchallenged, are undisturbed.

Consider for illustration recent voting law changes. Continue reading

Update: Virginia COVID-19 Testing and Nursing Home Data

by James C. Sherlock

I update here the continuing scandals in Virginia nursing home understaffing and COVID-19 testing.

In a quarterly update, the percentage of understaffed nursing homes and the Virginia’s relative standing among the states and D.C. in that statistic every quarter are posted on Medicare Nursing Home Compare. Here are the data from 03/30/2020:

  • Fifty-one percent of Virginia nursing homes are understaffed (below average or much below average).
  • Virginia ranks 45th worst of 51 among states and D.C. in percentage of nursing homes understaffed.
  • Forty-two Virginia nursing homes are rated one star (much below average)

I will update Virginia COVID-19 testing data weekly.

  • Virginia testing per million persons ranks 50th of 51 among states and D.C. (Only Kentucky is worse).  Source covidtracking.com uses only official state government data and is updated daily. This ranking is from 04/24/2020

A Source of Doctors, Nurses for COVID-19 Response

by James Sherlock

This morning, March 15, I sent an email to Dr. Dan Carey, Virginia Secretary of Health and Human Resources, to the Medical Society of Virginia and to the Medical Society of Northern Virginia. I offered a concept for significantly and quickly increasing the number of medical personnel available for COVID-19 response in Virginia and perhaps across the nation. The gist of that email was as follows:

There are a lot of medical specialties that will see a decrease in patient visits while the emergency is in effect. Perhaps you can figure (or have figured) out a way to organize that situation into an informal reserve force for the hospitals and primary care providers. I have an idea on how to do that. You may have better ones.

My idea is to organize a voluntary signup program for doctors, nurses and technicians built around doctors’ practices that will have a much lower influx of patients during this period. You know the specialties that fit that description better than I. Examples may include ophthalmologists and dermatologists. One way to do that is for those specialty offices to organize their reduced patient loads into say four days a week rather than five, or maybe even more if their practices are more heavily impacted by near-term cancellations. They could then sign up for that day or days as available for temporary call-up by local hospitals, primary care practices, nursing homes and others for emergency assistance.

Continue reading