Leftists Protest Marc Short Appointment at UVa

Marc Short

The Miller Center, a nonpartisan affiliate of the University of Virginia dedicated to presidential scholarship and public policy, has taken the bold step of hiring an outgoing member of the Trump administration, Marc Short. The Center is experiencing predictable blowback from campus leftists who regard the hiring of anyone from the Trump team as an abomination.

This morning more than 300 professors, librarians and students had signed a petition on Change.org, invoking the emotionally charged, upcoming anniversary of the Unite the Right rally to object to Short’s appointment.

As we approach the first anniversary of the white nationalist violence against this university, this town, and our friends, neighbors, students faculty and staff — all of whom are represented among the injured — it is unconscionable that we would add to our university a person who served in a high-level position for the administration that first empowered, then defended, those white nationalists.”

The university should not serve as a waystation for high-level members of an administration that has directly harmed our community and to this day attacks the institutions vital to a free society. …  While we do not object to dialogue with members of this administration, we do object to the use of our university to clean up their tarnished reputations. No one should be serving at the highest levels of this administration, daily supporting and defending its actions one week, then representing UVA the next.

Not only should the appointment be revoked, says the petition, “a full review [should] be held to understand how this appointment was made.”

The petition presented no evidence that Short, a White House liaison to Congress and a frequent administration spokesman on television, had “supported” or “defended” white nationalists himself. Indeed, a CNN article on Short’s departure highlighted his role in legislative matters such tax cuts, Supreme Court nominations, Obamacare repeal, not the divisive culture-war issues raised in President Trump’s tweets.

Last night, the Miller School was hanging tough. Howard Witt, director of communications, said in an email to Politico that the Miller study is nonpartisan, bipartisan, and employs former officials from both Republican and Democratic administration.

“We understand and respect those UVA faculty members and other critics — even some from within the Miller Center — who disagree with the decision to name Marc Short a senior fellow. One of our core values is fostering robust, but civil, debate across our nation’s bitter partisan divide,” said Howard Witt, director of communications and managing editor at the Miller Center, in an email.

Witt said the addition of Short “deepens our scholarly inquiries into the workings of the American presidency. And his presence reinforces our commitment to nonpartisan and bipartisan dialogue among scholars and practitioners of good will who may nevertheless hold strongly opposing personal political viewpoints. Moreover, Short can offer insights into the Trump administration that are not currently available to our scholars or the public at large.”

Bacon’s bottom line: Kudos to the Miller Center for sticking to its commitment to foster dialogue across the partisan divide. In a nation where political polarization intensifies daily, institutions that support open dialogue are more indispensable than ever.

It comes as no surprise that UVa leftists are trying to derail the appointment. Enforcing orthodoxy by shutting down dialogue is in their DNA. Lions hunt, hyenas scavenge, parasites infect, and leftists purge dissenting views.

This controversy bears watching. The stop-Short campaign started just yesterday — the Change.org petition went live around 6 p.m. — so it hasn’t had much time to build momentum. If the opposition gains steam, it could become a huge test for Jim Ryan, who becomes UVa’s new president Aug. 1. Bacon’s Rebellion will be watching. Alumni will be watching. And Virginia legislators will be watching.

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35 responses to “Leftists Protest Marc Short Appointment at UVa

  1. I am walking out the door, and will add much later, but this is a very good sign. The Miller Center is out of control now, as I have mentioned here numerous times earlier. The protest by the leftist against the appointment, and their theme, is sure proof of the corruption that needs to be removed, root and branch, from the Miller Center. Now we’ll see who has courage and who lacks it at UVA.

    • Who is this man Marc Short? This, according to Wikipedia:

      “Short was born in Virginia. He graduated from Washington and Lee University in 1992.

      Short served as finance director for Oliver North’s unsuccessful 1994 Senate campaign in Virginia. He then worked as spokesperson and executive director for The Freedom Alliance. Short was also the executive director of Young America’s Foundation.[2] In 1998, the group purchased the Reagan Ranch in California,[3] with the intention of using it for leadership seminars for college students. Short managed the property with his wife and got his start in fundraising from conservative donors.[2] The Shorts then returned to Virginia, where he received his MBA from the University of Virginia.

      Following his graduation, Short was hired as a spokesperson for the Department of Homeland Security. He then worked for Republican Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison, eventually becoming her chief of staff. When Hutchison ran for Governor of Texas, Short started working for then-Congressman Mike Pence, who named him chief of staff for the House Republican Conference in 2009. He remained in the position until 2011. Short was then hired by Freedom Partners, a non-profit, Koch-funded 501(c)(6) chamber of commerce located in Arlington, Virginia. He served as the organization’s President from 2011 to 2016. In February 2016, Short left his position at Freedom Partners to start his own consulting firm. Among his clients were Marco Rubio’s presidential campaign and Pence’s Indiana gubernatorial campaign. Pence eventually withdrew from the gubernatorial race to become Trump’s running mate. On June 16, 2016, Short was named Communications Advisor to then Vice Presidential candidate Pence.

      President Trump named Short the Director of Legislative Affairs on January 4, 2017.

      Short announced he would leave the White House post in the summer of 2018, citing “diminishing returns” of pushing President Donald Trump’s agenda.

      Marc and Kristen Short were married in 1997. They have three children and live in Arlington, Virginia.”

      See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Short

      • What does the Petition say in its entirety:

        “Stop UVA From Hiring Trump Official Marc Short!

        We, the undersigned members of the UVA community, write to protest the appointment of Donald Trump’s legislative affairs director Marc Short to positions at the Miller Center and Darden — a hire made without broad consultation with the many stakeholders affected by that decision.

        The university should not serve as a waystation for high-level members of an administration that has directly harmed our community and to this day attacks the institutions vital to a free society — the very thing that the University of Virginia, as an institution of higher education, is meant to protect.

        While we do not object to dialogue with members of this administration, we do object to the use of our university to clean up their tarnished reputations. No one should be serving at the highest levels of this administration, daily supporting and defending its actions one week, then representing UVA the next.

        More personally, as we approach the first anniversary of the white nationalist violence against this university, this town, and our friends, neighbors, students, faculty and staff — all of whom are represented among the injured — it is unconscionable that we would add to our university a person who served in a high-level position for the administration that first empowered, then defended, those white nationalists. We are a community still in the process of healing, and someone who defended the president’s remarks after the violence here is a barrier to that process, a source of trauma in a still-traumatized community.

        We ask that the appointment of Marc Short to the Miller Center and Darden be revoked, and that a full review be held to understand how this appointment was made. “

        • Who were the first 150 who signed the petition?

          Very roughly counted, the signers comprised:

          52 alumni
          24 current students
          17 members of UVa. Libraries
          11 members of History Department
          9 members of Religion Department
          5 members of Miller Center
          3 members each of English, Classics, and Media Departments
          2 members each of Architecture and Music Departments
          And assorted other departments, mostly within the humanities.

        • The first 150 signers of the Petition are:

          William I. Hitchcock, History Department
          Andrew Kahrl, History Department and Carter G. Woodson Institute
          Sarah Milov, History Department
          John Edwin Mason, History Department
          Matthew Hedstrom, Department of Religious Studies and Program in American Studies
          Keith Weimer, University of Virginia Library
          Erik Linstrum, History Department
          Steven Villereal, University of Virginia Library
          Siva Vaidhyanathan, Media Studies Department
          Dave Ghamandi, UVA Library
          Brian Balogh, History Department
          Natna Moore, TUJU 91.1 FM
          Sarah Lawson, Virginia Humanities
          Greg Schmidt Goering, Department of Religious Studies
          Amy Leigh Campbell, GSAS ‘01
          Joshua Rothman, GSAS ‘00
          Rebecca Coleman, University of Virginia Library
          Christine Slaughter, University of Virginia Library
          Allison Wright, Virginia Quarterly Review
          Lauren Turek, GSAS ‘09, ‘15
          Will Wyatt, ‘17, University of Virginia Library
          Aniko Bodroghkozy, Dept of Media Studies
          Lisa Goff, English Department and American Studies Program
          Erin Pappas, University of Virginia Library
          Todd Burks, University of Virginia Library
          Alissa Diamond, ‘02, ‘08, School of Architecture
          Christine Bestor Townsend, Law ‘09
          Gregory Hays, Dept. of Classics
          Winson Barham, University of Virginia Library
          Amber Lautigar Reichert, University of Virginia Library
          Bonnie Gordon Department of Music
          Jennifer Rubenstein, Politics Department
          Jessica Sewell, School of Architecture and American Studies Program
          Arlyn Newcomb, ‘88, University of Virginia Library
          David Singerman, History Department and American Studies
          Amanda Visconti, University of Virginia Library
          Mary Kuhn, English Department and Environmental Thought & Practice
          Melvyn P. Leffler, Department of History
          Laura Nelson, GSAS ‘11, Harvard American Studies
          K. S. Myers, Department of Classics
          Brandon Butler, Law ‘08, University of Virginia Library
          Mitchell Farish, GSAS 1989
          Karl Shuve, Department of Religious Studies
          Phylissa Mitchell, COLL ‘96, University Library
          Nicole Hemmer, Miller Center
          Patrick J. Coleman, University of Virginia Library
          Steven Weinberger, PhD GSAS ‘03, Department of Religious Studies
          Jack Hamilton, Media Studies and American Studies
          Brent Cebul, GSAS ‘14
          Sarah Mullen, School of Engineering
          Judith Thomas, COLL ‘78, GSAS ‘84, University of Virginia Library
          Sarah Dhere, CLAS 04
          Kathryn Laughon, PhD, RN, School of Nursing, NURS ‘98, 99
          David Rogers, COLL ‘69, ED’75
          Justin Peck, GSAS ‘14
          Victor Luftig, English Department and Center for Liberal Arts
          Carrie Baker, COLL ‘08, UVA Human Resources
          John Nemec, Department of Religious Studies
          Rob Rakove, GSAS ‘08
          Roger Sherman, Miller Center
          Fahad Bishara, History Department
          Sarah Cancienne, M.Arch ‘12
          Elizabeth R. Varon, History Department
          Kevin Hart, Department of Religious Studies
          Amanda Welch, BA Architectural History ‘93
          Stephen Macekura, GSAS ‘13
          Leif Fredrickson, GSAS ‘18
          Brian Rosenwald, GSAS ‘15
          Abby Flanigan, UVA Libraries
          Justin McBrien, GSAS, History Department
          Derek Hoff, David Eccles School of Business, University of Virginia (GSAS ‘06 and former Miller Center Dissertation Fellow)
          Cecilia Marquez, GSAS ‘16
          Alec Hickmott, GSAS ‘16
          Douglas A. Blackmon, Miller Center
          Lorenza Amico, GSAS ‘86, University of Virginia Library
          Lysle Boller, CLAS ‘11
          Eric Rettberg, Ph.D. English, GSAS ‘12
          Kimberly Rolla, UVA School of Law ‘13
          Lindsey Elizabeth Jones, Curry School of Education ‘13
          Fred Everett Maus, Department of Music
          Jap-Nanak Makkar, Department of English
          Diane Farlow Boller, CLAS ‘78
          Steven Kemper, Ph.D. in Music, ‘12
          Sarah Betzer, Art Department
          Katherine Boller, GSAS ‘09
          Elizabeth Fowler, Department of English
          Benjamin Hitchcock, Arts and Sciences ‘19
          Kara McClurken, University of Virginia Library
          Sheila Blackford, Miller Center
          Melissa J. Gismondi, GSAS, ‘17
          Isaac Mortimer-Lotke, Batten ‘19
          Paul Bearman, Arts and Sciences ‘19
          Erik Braun, Religious Studies, University of Virginia
          Maura Nakahata, CLAS ‘19
          Melissa Levy, Curry School of Education
          Anne Whitney, CLAS 2020
          Elizabeth Ozer, CLAS 2020
          Justin Paxton, CLAS 2010
          Brittany Shearer, CLAS 2013
          Tyler Garling, CLAS 2018
          Michael Inlow, CLAS 2020
          Bradley Skeen, CLAS 2019
          Ariana Maki, Department of Religious Studies
          Nana Mensah, CLAS 2020
          Heather A. Warren, Department of Religious Studies
          Jon Lee, CLAS 2019
          Eme Massarelli, CLAS 2020
          Alexander Monaco, CLSA 2021
          Kyle Haynes, GSAS 2012
          Emily Gadek, Department of Religious Studies
          LucyGordon Smith, CLAS 2017, Virginia College Advising Corps
          Mackenzie Springer, CLAS 2018
          Gwen Dilworth, CLAS ‘19
          Megan Claar, CLAS 2010
          David Shuster, CLAS ‘88, GSEAS ‘94, ‘98
          Andre Calvalcante, Media Studies and Women, Gender, and Sexuality
          Jackson Samples, CLAS 2020
          Virginia Chambers, CLAS 2020
          Seth Hochman, CLAS 2020
          Samuel Nicol, CLAS 2019, GSAS 2020
          Gaston Arze, College ‘17, GSAS ‘18
          Zuri Linetsky, GSAS ‘14
          Joshua White, History Department
          Frank Cirillo, GSAS ‘17
          Andrew Prince, CLAS 2021
          Brandon McKay, CLAS 2018
          Alex Cintron, CLAS 2019
          Alice DuCharme, CLAS 2018
          Evan Henry, CLAS 2018
          Jack Chellman, CLAS 2018
          Kyle Lascurettes, GSAS 2012, Miller Center Fellow 2011
          Shweta Watwe, CLAS 2020
          Lauren N. Haumesser, GSAS ‘18
          Tejo Tunuguntla, CLAS ‘18
          Emma Hitchcock CLAS ‘22
          Zoe Gray, CLAS 2020
          Sogyel Lhungay, Darden 2018
          Evan Cunningham, CLAS 2008
          [Name deleted at the request of the signatory.]
          Henry Akers, CLAS 2019
          James Burger, CLAS 2021
          Alexandra Evans, ‘18 (estimated)
          Gabriella Villafan, CLAS 2017
          Jason Farr, GSAS ‘16
          Matthew Law ‘15
          Michael de Groot, GSAS, ‘18
          Sam Plapinger, GSAS ‘18
          Anne Behnke Kinney, Department of East Asian Languages, Literatures and Cultures
          Coulter H. George, Department of Classics
          Anna Brickhouse, Department of English

    • What does the Petition say in its entirety and who has signed it?

      Here is full Petition:

      “Stop UVA from Hiring Trump Official Marc Short! July 19, 2018

      “We, the undersigned members of the UVA community, write to protest the appointment of Donald Trump’s legislative affairs director Marc Short to positions at the Miller Center and Darden — a hire made without broad consultation with the many stakeholders affected by that decision.

      The university should not serve as a waystation for high-level members of an administration that has directly harmed our community and to this day attacks the institutions vital to a free society — the very thing that the University of Virginia, as an institution of higher education, is meant to protect.

      While we do not object to dialogue with members of this administration, we do object to the use of our university to clean up their tarnished reputations. No one should be serving at the highest levels of this administration, daily supporting and defending its actions one week, then representing UVA the next.

      More personally, as we approach the first anniversary of the white nationalist violence against this university, this town, and our friends, neighbors, students, faculty and staff — all of whom are represented among the injured — it is unconscionable that we would add to our university a person who served in a high-level position for the administration that first empowered, then defended, those white nationalists. We are a community still in the process of healing, and someone who defended the president’s remarks after the violence here is a barrier to that process, a source of trauma in a still-traumatized community.

      We ask that the appointment of Marc Short to the Miller Center and Darden be revoked, and that a full review be held to understand how this appointment was made.”

      Very roughly counted the first 150 petition signers include:

      52 alumni
      24 current students
      17 professors or staff working in UVA libraries
      11 history professors (or staff?)
      9 religion professors (or staff?)
      5 current Miller Center employees or staff
      3 professors each in Media, English, and classic studies or staff
      2 professors each in Architecture, and music.

      Here is the full list of those first 150 signers:

      William I. Hitchcock, History Department
      Andrew Kahrl, History Department and Carter G. Woodson Institute
      Sarah Milov, History Department
      John Edwin Mason, History Department
      Matthew Hedstrom, Department of Religious Studies and Program in American Studies
      Keith Weimer, University of Virginia Library
      Erik Linstrum, History Department
      Steven Villereal, University of Virginia Library
      Siva Vaidhyanathan, Media Studies Department
      Dave Ghamandi, UVA Library
      Brian Balogh, History Department
      Natna Moore, TUJU 91.1 FM
      Sarah Lawson, Virginia Humanities
      Greg Schmidt Goering, Department of Religious Studies
      Amy Leigh Campbell, GSAS ‘01
      Joshua Rothman, GSAS ‘00
      Rebecca Coleman, University of Virginia Library
      Christine Slaughter, University of Virginia Library
      Allison Wright, Virginia Quarterly Review
      Lauren Turek, GSAS ‘09, ‘15
      Will Wyatt, ‘17, University of Virginia Library
      Aniko Bodroghkozy, Dept of Media Studies
      Lisa Goff, English Department and American Studies Program
      Erin Pappas, University of Virginia Library
      Todd Burks, University of Virginia Library
      Alissa Diamond, ‘02, ‘08, School of Architecture
      Christine Bestor Townsend, Law ‘09
      Gregory Hays, Dept. of Classics
      Winson Barham, University of Virginia Library
      Amber Lautigar Reichert, University of Virginia Library
      Bonnie Gordon Department of Music
      Jennifer Rubenstein, Politics Department
      Jessica Sewell, School of Architecture and American Studies Program
      Arlyn Newcomb, ‘88, University of Virginia Library
      David Singerman, History Department and American Studies
      Amanda Visconti, University of Virginia Library
      Mary Kuhn, English Department and Environmental Thought & Practice
      Melvyn P. Leffler, Department of History
      Laura Nelson, GSAS ‘11, Harvard American Studies
      K. S. Myers, Department of Classics
      Brandon Butler, Law ‘08, University of Virginia Library
      Mitchell Farish, GSAS 1989
      Karl Shuve, Department of Religious Studies
      Phylissa Mitchell, COLL ‘96, University Library
      Nicole Hemmer, Miller Center
      Patrick J. Coleman, University of Virginia Library
      Steven Weinberger, PhD GSAS ‘03, Department of Religious Studies
      Jack Hamilton, Media Studies and American Studies
      Brent Cebul, GSAS ‘14
      Sarah Mullen, School of Engineering
      Judith Thomas, COLL ‘78, GSAS ‘84, University of Virginia Library
      Sarah Dhere, CLAS 04
      Kathryn Laughon, PhD, RN, School of Nursing, NURS ‘98, 99
      David Rogers, COLL ‘69, ED’75
      Justin Peck, GSAS ‘14
      Victor Luftig, English Department and Center for Liberal Arts
      Carrie Baker, COLL ‘08, UVA Human Resources
      John Nemec, Department of Religious Studies
      Rob Rakove, GSAS ‘08
      Roger Sherman, Miller Center
      Fahad Bishara, History Department
      Sarah Cancienne, M.Arch ‘12
      Elizabeth R. Varon, History Department
      Kevin Hart, Department of Religious Studies
      Amanda Welch, BA Architectural History ‘93
      Stephen Macekura, GSAS ‘13
      Leif Fredrickson, GSAS ‘18
      Brian Rosenwald, GSAS ‘15
      Abby Flanigan, UVA Libraries
      Justin McBrien, GSAS, History Department
      Derek Hoff, David Eccles School of Business, University of Virginia (GSAS ‘06 and former Miller Center Dissertation Fellow)
      Cecilia Marquez, GSAS ‘16
      Alec Hickmott, GSAS ‘16
      Douglas A. Blackmon, Miller Center
      Lorenza Amico, GSAS ‘86, University of Virginia Library
      Lysle Boller, CLAS ‘11
      Eric Rettberg, Ph.D. English, GSAS ‘12
      Kimberly Rolla, UVA School of Law ‘13
      Lindsey Elizabeth Jones, Curry School of Education ‘13
      Fred Everett Maus, Department of Music
      Jap-Nanak Makkar, Department of English
      Diane Farlow Boller, CLAS ‘78
      Steven Kemper, Ph.D. in Music, ‘12
      Sarah Betzer, Art Department
      Katherine Boller, GSAS ‘09
      Elizabeth Fowler, Department of English
      Benjamin Hitchcock, Arts and Sciences ‘19
      Kara McClurken, University of Virginia Library
      Sheila Blackford, Miller Center
      Melissa J. Gismondi, GSAS, ‘17
      Isaac Mortimer-Lotke, Batten ‘19
      Paul Bearman, Arts and Sciences ‘19
      Erik Braun, Religious Studies, University of Virginia
      Maura Nakahata, CLAS ‘19
      Melissa Levy, Curry School of Education
      Anne Whitney, CLAS 2020
      Elizabeth Ozer, CLAS 2020
      Justin Paxton, CLAS 2010
      Brittany Shearer, CLAS 2013
      Tyler Garling, CLAS 2018
      Michael Inlow, CLAS 2020
      Bradley Skeen, CLAS 2019
      Ariana Maki, Department of Religious Studies
      Nana Mensah, CLAS 2020
      Heather A. Warren, Department of Religious Studies
      Jon Lee, CLAS 2019
      Eme Massarelli, CLAS 2020
      Alexander Monaco, CLSA 2021
      Kyle Haynes, GSAS 2012
      Emily Gadek, Department of Religious Studies
      LucyGordon Smith, CLAS 2017, Virginia College Advising Corps
      Mackenzie Springer, CLAS 2018
      Gwen Dilworth, CLAS ‘19
      Megan Claar, CLAS 2010
      David Shuster, CLAS ‘88, GSEAS ‘94, ‘98
      Andre Calvalcante, Media Studies and Women, Gender, and Sexuality
      Jackson Samples, CLAS 2020
      Virginia Chambers, CLAS 2020
      Seth Hochman, CLAS 2020
      Samuel Nicol, CLAS 2019, GSAS 2020
      Gaston Arze, College ‘17, GSAS ‘18
      Zuri Linetsky, GSAS ‘14
      Joshua White, History Department
      Frank Cirillo, GSAS ‘17
      Andrew Prince, CLAS 2021
      Brandon McKay, CLAS 2018
      Alex Cintron, CLAS 2019
      Alice DuCharme, CLAS 2018
      Evan Henry, CLAS 2018
      Jack Chellman, CLAS 2018
      Kyle Lascurettes, GSAS 2012, Miller Center Fellow 2011
      Shweta Watwe, CLAS 2020
      Lauren N. Haumesser, GSAS ‘18
      Tejo Tunuguntla, CLAS ‘18
      Emma Hitchcock CLAS ‘22
      Zoe Gray, CLAS 2020
      Sogyel Lhungay, Darden 2018
      Evan Cunningham, CLAS 2008
      [Name deleted at the request of the signatory.]
      Henry Akers, CLAS 2019
      James Burger, CLAS 2021
      Alexandra Evans, ‘18 (estimated)
      Gabriella Villafan, CLAS 2017
      Jason Farr, GSAS ‘16
      Matthew Law ‘15
      Michael de Groot, GSAS, ‘18
      Sam Plapinger, GSAS ‘18
      Anne Behnke Kinney, Department of East Asian Languages, Literatures and Cultures
      Coulter H. George, Department of Classics
      Anna Brickhouse, Department of English

    • This isn’t coming from leftists. August 12 is like a raw wound for people in the area, people of all political affiliations. This is going to be an extremely hard sell, not because he’s conservative but because he’s associated with the communications response to the August 12 attack, which was not appropriate.

      Opposing removal of statues doesn’t make you a Nazi. But that specific protest was a white nationalist, Neo Nazi protest advertised with Neo Nazi symbolism. It’s a real sore spot for the area, and some of the names you posted are people I recognize as distinguished faculty.

      • Virginiagal2 –

        Welcome back. We likely have different perspective’s on this issue, as we have had on other issues in the past, but I have dearly missed your participation here, as I value your opinions, insights and honestly. Please stick around at least for this discussion. And I hope for more.

        • Thank you so much. I have missed participating.

          I think it’s important to recognize the lasting impact of events that leave people in fear for friends and family. The response is going to be different than something that’s purely based on political preferences.

      • Sorry Va Gal but Trump didn’t cause the protests and Trump didn’t fail to adequately maintain order in Charlottesville that day. Referring to the issue of preserving or removing Confederate statues he said there were good people on both sides of that question. There are. He also said there was plenty of blame to go around. Also true.

        I’m sorry the snowflakes in Charlottesville can’t get over the tragedy that was Aug 12, 2017. However, the blame needs to be placed where it belongs. Nazis, Antifa and an incompetent governor and mayor were the problems that day. The animus against President Trump is misplaced and idiotic. When terrorists attacked us in Northern Virginia we blamed the terrorists not Presidents Clinton or Bush. There’s a lesson in that for the people in Charlottesville. Politicizing the tragedy of Aug 12 as an anti-Trump protest is, quite frankly, disgraceful. The people who signed that petition should be ashamed of themselves.

        • I didn’t say or imply that Trump caused the protests or was in charge of local public safety. I do know that his comments about protesters was incorrect, and he did not correct himself. This rally was explicitly a white supremacist rally, advertised with white supremacist symbols, and Nazi imagery was prominent at the rally and beforehand. This was not a rally by people who simplify disagree with taking confederate statues down. No one marching could be unaware they were marching alongside Nazi symbolism.

          People who have seen their friends, neighbors, and co workers threatened, injured and killed tend to get upset. Calling them snowflakes for that normal human response suggests you are not able to rebut the actual situation.

          Denouncing Nazis is not hard. There weren’t fine people on both sides that day. You had the ideology my dad fought against in World War Two, and everyone else. I never thought anyone in conservatism would sink to defending Nazis. It’s not a good idea no matter what the short term political gains.

  2. Don’t they understand that by helping facilitate the headlong flight of people away from the dysfunctional Trump White House, they weaken its effectiveness? I think Charlottesville is a great place for the refugees to settle! Balance, fairness and equity have never been the goals of True Believers anywhere. I hope the university and Miller Center just let it blow over.

  3. I guess I’m surprised George Mason didn’t snap him up!

  4. I only know Marc Short from his television appearances, and I respect the Miller Center’s basic integrity if not always enjoy their programs. He is good at the evasive tactics, the diversions, the getting of your employer’s position out there, the stonewalling necessary to represent our disturbingly-self-centered President as rational. He is a loyal shill for a disloyal, unkind, uncaring and incompetent chief executive. He’s an improvement on the Press Secretary for articulateness. But I have yet to hear what he actually thinks about any of these topics he addresses, or hear what likelihood there really is that he will reveal the inner soul of this peculiarly soulless administration. I hope the Miller Center knows what it’s doing putting their marbles in Short’s basket for the coming confrontation.

    • “He is a loyal shill for a disloyal, unkind, uncaring and incompetent chief executive.”

      Wow. Weren’t you the guy taking me to task for calling Tim Kaine names? I personally think it’s fine to ridicule public officials and the governmental organizations but I thought you were on the other side of that fence.

  5. I don’t know him at all, but he seems to be the kind of experienced Capitol Hill hand who might have something to teach students. And Acbar, he is leaving after less than two years with the transition and the new administration. When competent people walk away from that kind of power voluntarily, there is a reason.

  6. Not much difference between today’s Progressives and the Bolsheviks. One point of view is tolerated. And another good reason why we need the Second Amendment should the Progressives ever gain full control over government.

    BTW, the 9th Circuit upheld a trial court’s grant of an injunction against a California law barring the sale and possession of clips that could hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition. http://michellawyers.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Duncan-2018-07-17-Memorandum-Affirming.pdf

  7. I have bad news for those professors who somehow want to equate Donald Trump with what happened in Charlottesville. First, those same groups marched in various different cities with no major issues. Why? Donald Trump was president when they marched in Seattle but there were no riots. Nobody died. The simple fact is that the white separatists and nazis are disgusting but the violence was the direct result of incompetence on the part of the then governor of Virginia and the Mayor of Charlottesville.

    The counter-protesters, not the nazis, started the violence. How do I know? I saw it on a video. The documentary “White Right: Meeting the Enemy” is available on Netflix.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Right:_Meeting_the_Enemy

    The documentary is produced by Deeyah Khan, a Muslim woman from the United Kingdom. Ms Khan created quite a stir in the UK when she made some relatively innocuous (in my opinion) comments about Muslim immigration. She was bombarded by hateful commentary often from white nationalist groups. Rather than shriek about Donald Trump or start a MoveOn petition she decided to do something useful and meet with those racist groups documenting their side of the story. The result is the fascinating “Meeting the Enemy” documentary.

    By coincidence, Ms Khan interviewed at least one of the hate groups planning to march on Charlottesville. She even joined them on their march camera in hand. Make no mistake – she was in no way supportive of their cause but was determined to show people what motivated these groups on a personal level.

    During the march in Charlottesville, caught on the documentary, Ms Khan is marching with the racists while filming the events. The streets are lined with counter-protesters and there are plenty of insulting words exchanged. However, the protesters are following the rules and marching peacefully despite their horrible message. Suddenly, the counter-protesters start spraying the marchers with pepper spray. Ms Khan herself can barely continue filming as she is nearly overcome by the pepper spray. However, she perseveres and documents the violence of the counter-protesters against the protesters.

    Sorry Libtwits but it’s not only captured on film it’s captured on film by a woman who has no reason whatsoever to be sympathetic to the protesters.

    I highly recommend Ms Khan’s documentary. It not only sheds new light on Charlottesville it also illustrates the immaturity and low intelligence of some white nationalist leaders. The segment on Richard Spenser is particularly interesting. While seemingly intelligent one gets the impression that he’s just putting on an act. Borat with a swastika. Carrying on about how he is one of the elite and how the elite (like him) are destined to run the world he sounds more like a General Assembly session than a dangerous white separatist.

    • DJ, that is not correct. I’ve seen the documentary. I also have many friends and family who live in and near Charlottesville, and were there that weekend.

      The documentary shows one fight and talks about the marchers being pepper sprayed, not tear gassed. It absolutely does not show that the counter protesters started it.

      At the time they got pepper sprayed, the protestors had already harassed people at Walmart, run someone off the road in a truck bearing white nationalist emblems, and had a tiki torch Nazi march on the Lawn, which is a living space for students as well as a historic landmark. A number of students hid in Larry Sabatos pavilion. I spent the weekend in fear for my friends and family.

      Other students, faculty and staff were assaulted in conflict on the Lawn, with after effects of the assault sending one staff member to the hospital with a stroke caused by injury to an artery in his neck.

      All that happened before the filmed march. Local people, and people with family in the area, were extremely afraid and angry. That includes me.

      Most of the white nationalists marching were from out of town. Most of the counter protesters were local. Local people had heard about the Walmart incident, the pickup incident, and the torch march. We knew that because we follow the local news.

      I am not any kind of activist, but I don’t want UVA to hire anyone remotely affiliated with both sides apologism about August 12. There was a good side and a bad side, and crazy Nazis running people over were on the bad side.

      • The documentary quite clearly shows a group of disgusting but non-violent protesters being pepper sprayed without provocation. Even the Muslim activist who made the documentary was pepper sprayed. Were there other groups where the Nazis started the problems? Probably so. But when Trump said there was plenty of blame to go around he was right. I’m sorry but I lived in Charlottesville and I have plenty of friends who still live there. I also lived in Chicago where Nazis marched in Grant Park every weekend. The Chicago Police maintained control. Nobody liked the Nazis but nobody got killed either. Freedom of speech includes freedom of disgraceful speech. Had the incompetent mayor of Charlottesville or the equally incompetent governor of Virginia maintained order as was done in dozens of other cities around the country in 2017 there would have been no tragedy. Trying to refuse Marc Short a position in Charlottesville based on the disaster of Aug 12 would be akin to refusing Hillary Clinton access to Northern Virginia because her husband was too busy with Monica Lewinski to worry about Al Qaeda.

        Politicizing the tragedy of Charlottesville as an anti-Trump protest is disgraceful. Pathetic in fact.

        • The day before the rally, there were complaints that Cantwells group was pointing guns at people in the Walmart parking lot (no arrests presumably because open carry is legal), that a pickup with white supremacist symbols had run a car off the road, and multiple injuries, some serious, at a violent tiki torch march on the Lawn. It had already started long before the filmmakers group got pepper sprayed.

          Charlottesville tried to cancel the march, then tried to move it, and was denied the ability to do so by a judge following an ACLU lawsuit. You may remember Waldo Jaquith resigned from the Virginia ACLU board over this, after the August 12th incident. The city didn’t have the manpower to handle this and they didn’t get enough support from the state, who could have called up the National Guard if there weren’t enough troopers available.

          This rally wasn’t Trumps fault, although you could argue his presidency has encouraged these groups. However, it was not equal blame on both sides. You had a lot of angry out of state white supremacists, and a bunch of angry or annoyed mostly local counter protesters. There weren’t fine people marching on both sides. The normal people who wanted to keep the statue want nothing to do with Neo Nazis. They stayed home. You had trouble makers on both sides, that much I can agree.

          Saying fine people on both sides is whitewashing, literally, the truth. Hiring one of the communications people from that messaging is not something that’s going to sit well where it happened.

          I don’t live in Charlottesville but I’m typically in the area multiple times a month, and I have many friends and family there.

          For anyone who hasn’t seen the documentary, it’s currently on Netflix.

  8. re: ” The simple fact is that the white separatists and nazis are disgusting but the violence was the direct result of incompetence on the part of the then governor of Virginia and the Mayor of Charlottesville.”

    Are these the same cities that have had their own police kill people of color and get exposed ?

    I’d be careful with covering their with glory for their “competence”.

    In Boston and other cities – they OUTLAW the carrying of weapons at demonstrations – and the police do enforce it.

    In Richmond, Va – they were having spasms of fright over the prospect of the two groups showing up with weaponry because apparently Virginia does not prohibit carrying weaponry like those other cities do.

    Virginia is where black people were lynched – including Charlottesville – and those who abhor that legacy were not going to let racists do their thing without a challenge.

    I too saw videos and I saw a LOT of provocation , taunts, and weapons being aimed – prior to violence. Who actually crossed that last line into violence is almost irrelevant…once it had escalated to it’s flash point.

    It could happen again in Virginia – as long as Virginia has no laws that prohibit weapons at demonstrations. Maybe that’s the “incompetence”?

    Here’s what Boston did:

    ” What was the police presence be like?

    More than 500 police officers monitored the rally on the Common.

    Items that can be used as weapons, such as sticks and bats, were not be permitted at the rally, police have said.

    Guns, knives, shields, fireworks, glass containers, cans, alcohol, coolers, wagons, or pull carts, coolers, drones, grills, bicycles, pets with the exception of service animals, and pop-up tents and canopies were also prohibited.

    Backpacks and bags were discouraged and subject to searches.”

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/08/19/what-you-need-know-about-saturday-demonstrations-boston/QuZA5PEpPIoFBhlBrxpPJM/story.html

    so the question is – Would Virginia do that? In any city or place, including Charlottesville or would it be considered “abridging”….. “free speech”?

  9. well n0 – not “somehow” : this way: ” Police allowed protesters onto the sidewalks of the barricaded streets after frisking them at entry points.

    …….


    The university was prepared for the worst. Roadblocks and barricades were set up to control the crowds. And helicopters and drones circled, while snipers stood atop buildings surrounding the Phillips Center for Performing Arts.

    The Alachua County Sheriff’s Office said two people had been arrested. One man, who they said was armed security hired by the media, was arrested for carrying a firearm on campus.”

    Looks like weapons were not allowed in both cases.

    is that denying them their “rights”?

    Remember in Charlottesville – the skinheads not only said they were coming – but they would be ARMED and it was THEN that the “other side” responded in kind….

    Was Virginia “incompetent” for allowing both sides to have weapons?

    come on …truth…

  10. Oh yes, very much so.

    • Grossly incompetent and culpably negligent. And now the governor who stood on the sidelines and watched the one white supremacist rally in the country that turned deadly wants to be president. You must be kidding me. He couldn’t keep a lid on a couple of hundred asshats in Charlottesville but now he wants to run the entire country? C’mon.

      • Don –

        Unfortunately, I suspect that from then Gov. McAuliffe’s perspective, he did a brilliant job acting in ways that set up a great campaign wedge issue to fire up his base and splinter the nation’s electorate apart in ways that he thinks will served his campaign for President.

        The Democrats love Charlotteville’s tragedy, he created for them. It’s great red meat for them to demagogue about. This, of course for the pro politician, is the oldest political game in town. Rile up the uninformed voter. Witness the Campus Rape Epidemic that Obama and Biden cooked up for the 2012 presidential campaign. Recall all the harm those two craven power hungry politicians intentionally did to the country for their private benefit. The Democrats love all this, they are beating this newest horse for all its worth, along with the Russia collusion scandal, and whatever other memes they can gin up then cascade for upcoming elections.

        Meanwhile, America’s voters today, or at least half of them, take these lies and false events, and their spin, hook, line and sinker. Sadly, more and more American voters today can be riled up at will like the old “Arab Street.” We are being played like puppets in an old time country carnival.

        • I can excuse a lot when it comes to our clown politicians. However, I have to draw the line at innocent dead citizens. I supported McAuliffe as a candidate. However, his tenure as governor was disgraceful. He accomplished nothing and politicized an office that had generally not been politicized. Thankfully, Northam seems to be eschewing the national limelight.

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