America’s New Ruling Class: Washington Post Edition

So long, Stonewall

by James A. Bacon

That didn’t take long. In the wake of Washington Post articles alleging systemic racism at the Virginia Military Institute, the Board of Visitors voted Thursday to remove the statue of Stonewall Jackson from its campus. The action follows the Monday resignation of J.H. Binford Peay III, the institute’s superintendent, who had resisted calls to remove the statue on the grounds that Jackson, one of America’s iconic military geniuses, had been an instructor at the Institute before the Civil War.

After the board’s capitulation, Chairman John “Bill” Boland told the Washington Post, “It’s time to move forward. [The monument] was drawing a lot of fire and distracting from what our true mission is. The most important thing to me is to maintain our mission and our methods.”

The board also voted to create a diversity office and a diversity inclusion committee. Of its 17 board members, three are black, noted reporter Ian Shapira. Also, he observed, “All of the school’s top officials, including the VMI chief of staff, the faculty dean and the inspector general/Title IX coordinator, are White men.”

I got to thinking, how diverse is the Washington Post editorial staff? Does the Post live up to the standards it imposes on others? The newspaper lists its newsroom leadership here. You can click on the names, and in most cases you will find a photograph by which you can discern the individual’s gender and race. But I’ll save you the trouble. Scroll down and see if you detect a pattern. (To read my wrap-up, scroll all the way to the bottom.)
These names are listed in the same order as presented on the WaPo newsroom leadership page. The higher on the page, the higher the rank in the newsroom hierarchy.

Martin Baron
Executive editor
.
.
.
.
.

Cameron Barr
Managing Editor (news and features coverage)
.
.
.
.
.

Kat Downs Mulder
Managing Editor (Digital, photography, video, copy desk, social media)
.
.
.
.

Tracy Grant
Managing Editor (Hiring and development, ethics and standards)
.
.
.
.

Krissah Thompson
Managing Editor (Diversity and inclusion)
.
.
.
.
.

Scott Vance
Deputy Managing Editor(daily report)
.
.
.
.
.

Barbara Vobejda
Deputy Managing Editor (Daily report)
.
.
.
.
.

[Photo missing]
Timothy Curran
Enterprise Editor (Weekend)

Steven Ginsberg
National Editor
.
.
.
.
.

Lori Montgomery
Deputy National Editor
.
.
.
.
.

Douglas Jehl
Foreign editor
.
.
.
.
.

[Photo missing]
Eva Rodriguez
Deputy Foreign Editor

Mike Semel
Local Editor (regional coverage, also education, religion, transportation)
.
.
.
.

[Photo missing]
Monica Norton
Deputy Local Editor

Liz Seymour
Executive Features (entertainment, arts, magazine, food, travel, lifestyle, fiction books)
.
.
.
.

[Photo missing}
David Malitz
Deputy Features Editor

Mitch Rubin
Deputy Features Editor
.
.
.
.
.

David Cho
Business Editor
.
.
.
.
.

Zachary A. Goldfarb
Deputy Business Editor
.
.
.
.
.

[Photo Missing]
Jeff Leen
Investigations Editor

David S. Fallis
Deputy Investigations Editor
.
.
.
.
.

[Photo Missing]
Eric Rich
Deputy Investigations Editor

Matthew Vita
Sports Editor
.
.
.
.
.

Matt Rennie
Deputy Sports Editor
.
.
.
.
.

Adam B. Kushner
Outlook Editor (Outlook section, PostEverything online venue, nonfiction books)
.
.
.
.

Mike Madden
Deputy Outlook Editor
.
.
.
.
.

Micah Gelman
Director of Editorial Video
.
.
.
.
.

Phoebe Connelly
Deputy Video Editor
.
.
.
.
.

David Bruns
Executive Producer
.
.
.
.
.

Michelle Jaconi
Executive Producer, Creative
.
.
.
.
.

Ryan Kellett
Senior Director, Audience
.
.
.
.
.

Mark Smith
Director, Social and Operations
.
.
.
.
.

Tessa Muggeridge
Subscriptions and Engagement Editor (including newsletters and alerts)
.
.
.
.

J. Freedom du Lac
Live News Editor
.
.
.
.
.

MaryAnne Golon
Director of Photography
.
.
.
.
.

Robert Miller
Deputy Director of Photography
.
.
.
.
.

[Photo missing]
Dudley Brooks
Deputy Director of Photography

Jesse Lewis
Multiplatform Editing Chief
.
.
.
.
.

Courtney Rukan
Deputy Multiplatform Editor
.
.
.
.
.

Gregory Manifold
Creative Director
.
.
.
.
.

Brian Gross
Deputy Design Director
.
.
.
.
.

Kenisha R. Malcolm
Universal News Desk Editor (homepage, online platforms)
.
.
.
.

Emily Tsao
Deputy Universal News Desk Editor
.
.
.
.
.

Christopher Meighan
Director, Emerging News Products
.
.
.
.
.

Coleen O’Lear
Deputy Director, Emerging News Products
.
.
.
.
.

Greg Barber
Director, Newsroom Product
.
.
.
.
.

[Photo missing]
Charity Brown
Deputy Editor, Newsroom Product

Chiqui Esteban
Graphics Director
.
.
.
.
.

Jessica Stahl
Director of Audio
.
.
.
.
.

Elite Truong
Director of Strategic Initiatives
.
.
.
.
.

Jillian S. Jarrett
Director of Newsroom Operations
.
.
.
.
.

In his reporting on VMI, Post reporter Shapira deems it noteworthy that only three of the military school’s 17 board members are black. I find it noteworthy that only one of the Washington Post’s top 17 senior editors is black — and she’s pigeon-holed as managing editor of “diversity and inclusion”! One senior editor is Hispanic. All the rest are white.

In other words, the senior editorial staff of the Washington Post is less ethnically diverse than the VMI Board of Visitors, which oversees an institution that the Post has labeled as “relentlessly racist.”

The newsroom leadership page lists 51 individuals, 43 of whose photos are available. Five are black (one of whom has a West Indian background), four are Asian, and two are Hispanic (one of whom has a European Spanish background). That count may not be 100% accurate; one or two individuals may be biracial. It’s not always easy to tell from the photos. But those numbers are pretty close to the reality.

Most of the minorities who are on the Post’s editorial leadership team are low on in the hierarchy. Besides of the diversity & inclusion editor, the highest ranking African-American on the staff, the deputy director of photography, ranks 36 on the list. Most minority positions are in digital or ancillary operations. The men and women who set the newspaper’s editorial tone and shapes its narratives are overwhelmingly white.

Bacon’s bottom line: The Washington Post, like other cultural institutions that increasingly dominate our lives, is dominated by super-woke white liberal men and women bent upon transforming American society. As they heap opprobrium on the few remaining conservative institutions in our society, super-woke white liberals do not apply the same standards to themselves that they impose upon others. In other words, they are appalling hypocrites.

Worse, they have abandoned traditional journalistic standards in favor of building narratives which they pursue relentlessly with no pretense of fairness. The result is disgracefully one-sided articles such as those depicting VMI as a racist hell hole.

America’s cultural elite won’t rest until it has neutered or destroyed every conservative institution in the land. The Washington Post is conducting war on middle America, and its time middle Americans fought back.

There are currently no comments highlighted.

52 responses to “America’s New Ruling Class: Washington Post Edition

  1. I haven’t seen so many snowflakes in one place since Snowmageddon.

  2. The Washington Post is a piece of crap. It’s top positions look pretty white and pretty Jewish to me, well above their representation in the local demographics. If Bezos is truly committed to having his media company look like the Metropolitan area, he needs to get rid of a lot of people at the top.

    It reminds me of a discussion of affirmative action when I was in law school. A few of my Jewish friends made strong arguments about the need for the student body to better reflect the demographics of Minnesota and the Twin Cities. Our left-leaning professor asked how should the University address those groups that were over-represented in the law school. (Just like FCPS is trying to address those groups (Asians) who are over-represented at TJ.) My friends made arguments that there should be no upper limits on any demographic group. Merit should apply. Unless society wants a new group of “victims,” quotas – official or unofficial – require quotas across the board.

    The Post, not surprisingly, fails to walk its talk. And Bezos doesn’t have the stones to make it.

    • I’m supposed to be surprised? Did you actually get the editorial page staff as well? I bet it looked very similar 20 or 30 years ago. Doesn’t reflect the population of its home base city….but it has never thought like a local paper.

    • “…pretty white and pretty Jewish…”

      Rare acknowledgement that in general Jews don’t qualify as white for a large part of the white population. Why this doesn’t count toward diversity for the Post is a question left for the reader.

      • Louis Farrakhan and I agree on that one point. European is European, regardless of religion. That was TMT making that assumption and comment, not Bacon.

        • I’ll agree with you and Farrakhan as soon as synagogues stop being shot up and Jewish cemeteries stopped being defaced with swastikas.

          • In Virginia? Three chances; slim, fat, and none. If there were no Blacks, they’d revert to the ol’ standby.

    • TMT, I agree with your sentiments except in one important regard. I don’t know what Jewishness has to do with the white power structure at the Washington Post. Some editors may be Jewish. I don’t know, I don’t care, and I don’t think it is relevant to my argument. (I would wager that almost all of the WaPo’s editors fall into the “secular humanist” camp regardless of what their religious heritage was growing up.) I would advise you to walk back your statement. Otherwise you play into the leftist trope that conservatives are either closeted or open anti-semites.

      • Jewish people are often referred to as members of an ethno-religious group, as are French Huguenots and many others. It has nothing to do with individual religious beliefs if any.

        For example, a large number of Huguenots in the United States found their way to Episcopal congregations despite the major theological differences between Anglican and Calvinist doctrine. The original Huguenot church in New Rochelle, NY transformed itself into an Episcopal church a long time ago. The only standing Huguenot church is in Charleston, S.C. Yet, French Huguenots are generally viewed as an ethno-religious group.

  3. James Wyatt Whitehead V

    Stopped reading the WP when they jumped the price from 35 cents to 50 cents. Don’t miss it all. The WP is nothing more than a M-1 Abrams tank for the left’s war on culture. Nixon had a few thoughts about the WP:

  4. I’ll bet they don’t have any ethnic-Phoenicians in upper-management either…

  5. Hypocritical? Yes of course; diversity in leadership mandated by group identity to match “their representation in the local demographics” only makes sense if you’re involved in sales to those demographics (understand the customer).

    But there’s something quite different than sales going on here. This isn’t about the make-up of the VMI board. This isn’t even about selling a military school’s charms to Virginia’s diverse high school grads today. It’s about a military school’s traditions arising from and commemorating its participation in a war to preserve slavery – on the wrong side, if you agree that slavery should have ended. The vote to remove the Jackson statue was unanimous, as it should have been.

    Contrast this with W&L next door wrestling with Lee’s legacy. Lee accepted the challenge of bringing struggling Washington College back from the brink of closing. He staked the final period of his life on rebuilding this ruined remnant of pre-War primary education, to rebuild Virginia for the future, and he succeeded. He had nothing to do with the cult of adulation that sprang up in the South decades after his death and placed him on that List Cause pedestal. Should W&L deny Lee’s critical contribution to its survival? Jackson, by contrast, had no postwar career; he was a gifted engineer but his contribution to VMI was military, as a military teacher and military example and military inspiration to his students and his State. To what end? To defend slavery against a federal government more-or-less determined to abolish it. And for that, students at VMI were required to salute his statue on the parade grounds. Lee chose a similar wartime path but that was not his essential contribution to W&L.

    So, what is it about each of these men that they should be revered by today’s students at their respective institutions? I say the VMI Board made an easy decision, but for the difficulty of handling the (sometimes racist) alumni reaction to it. The make-up of that Board is not relevant to the decision made. W&L, keep Lee’s name? Now, that’s a tough one.

    • James Wyatt Whitehead V

      One easy fix for Lee and Jackson statues. Make them beardless. Lee and Jackson only had beards for the war years and for Lee the last 5 years of his life. As a professor at VMI, Jackson never had a beard. In fact you would not recognize him. Very weak chinned. Lee did have a mustache prior to the war but was always beardless. You would not recognize Lee in antebellum pictures.
      Problem solved since nobody would recognize them.

  6. “The Washington Post, like other cultural institutions that increasingly dominate our lives…”

    The daily readership of WaPo is smaller than the population of Fairfax County. Tucker Carlson will speak to more people on his show tonight than will have purchased the Post all week. The SCOTUS, POTUS, and Senate are all held by conservatives. If this is conservatives being dominated by the left then conservatives are pathetically weak.

    You are right that culture has shifted. What was once socially acceptable racism and discrimination is no longer tolerated. John Carlos and Tommie Smith were vilified for putting their fists in the air. Now the NBA is putting social justice slogans on their uniforms. But that change is a change of the free market – no one forced Nike to make Kaepernick the center of an ad campaign, they did it because they could make money off it. The number and percent of interracial unions is going up every year – not because WaPo said to do it, but because people are choosing to love outside of race and as that happens more people are going to find other types of bigotry intolerable. Sorry.

    “As they heap opprobrium on the few remaining conservative institutions in our society…”

    A few years back it was UVA in the cross hairs of a national media figure – was that because UVA was a conservative institution? Because even back then there were plenty of jokes about it being Berkeley East.

    “America’s cultural elite won’t rest until it has neutered or destroyed every conservative institution in the land. The Washington Post is conducting war on middle America, and its time middle Americans fought back.”

    Always fun to see “the press is the enemy of the people” be stated so plainly.

    How do the steps the BoV have taken and the retirement of Peay neuter or destroy the conservative elements of VMI? What about adding racism and discrimination next to lying, cheating, and stealing in the Honor Code runs counter to conservatism?

  7. What exactly is the point? BR outside of Kerry is a white male operation. Completely. And TMT , do you have to bring that someone looks Jewish? So what? Should you get them gold Stars of David?BR is getting a bit rough and is losing its soul. You guys have been through Muslims. Are Jews next on the list?

    • If anything has been demonstrated in the past couple of months, it is that Jim will accept and run columns from just about anybody. It is way more than us regulars anymore. Even my favorite topics are drawing a crowd, so I’m posting way less.

    • BS Peter. Whether you look at Jews or WASPs as a religious or ethno-religious, there are many more at high levels of the Post than in any related demographic. And if you don’t think the Post has made a concerted effort to attract members of other ethnic, religious or ethno-religious groups as reporters, unlike Bill Clinton, you must be inhaling. And even there, there is a vast difference between reporters and editors/managers.

      Lots of people are interested in religious and ethnic backgrounds. https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/01/03/5-facts-about-the-religious-makeup-of-the-116th-congress/

      “While the number of self-identified Christians in Congress has ticked down slightly, Christians as a whole – and especially Protestants and Catholics – are still overrepresented in proportion to their share in the general public. But by far, the largest difference between the U.S. public and Congress is in the share of people who are unaffiliated with a religious group. In the general public, 23% say they are atheist, agnostic or “nothing in particular.” In Congress, just one person says she is religiously unaffiliated – Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., who was recently elected to the Senate after three terms in the House.”

  8. One more thing. The Roanoke times had the story about racial tensions at VMI in June. Can’t you people wean yourselves from Post bashing? What exactly do you know about it? I have free lanced there for 10 years and never had a problem.

  9. What is the technique that professional propagandists and smear merchants like the Washington Post use to destroy American institutions, groups and people. Several years ago on this blog I introduced the concept of Cascading Memes, as earlier described by professors Cass Sunstein and Timur Kuran. Here is the latest iteration on that smear and propaganda technique as described by Quillette on Oct. 26, 2020:

    “How Availability Cascades are Shaping our Politics, written by Vincent Harinam and David Kopel

    We are the company we keep. Although our beliefs and actions are personal, they are often heavily affected by the people around us. When everyone else seems to be thinking the same way, we may succumb to crowd pressure rather than thinking for ourselves.

    When all available information seems to indicate that everyone is falling in line with a certain belief, we may be under the influence of an “availability cascade.” Today, our politics and public discourse are being poisoned by availability cascades. Thanks partly to partisan domination of the media and academia, many people are being pressured into publicly espousing beliefs that are not their own.

    Two components make up an availability cascade: an informational cascade and a reputational cascade. An informational cascade creates genuine changes in people’s beliefs by providing plentiful but misleading information. A reputational cascade is a vicious cycle in which individuals feign expressions of conviction to retain social approval.

    In the 2007 article “Availability Cascades and Risk Regulation,” professors Cass Sunstein and Timur Kuran described how availability cascades can cause poor decision-making. For example, in the late 1970s in Niagara Falls, New York, an old chemical waste dump, the Love Canal, began leaking. Government officials monitored chemical levels in the area and found that the leaks were too small to cause adverse health effects.

    Nevertheless, a local woman, Lois Gibbs, began telling her neighbors that their whole neighborhood was highly toxic. People began blaming their health problems on the Love Canal. As the panic spread, politicians fell in line with their terrified constituents. Soon, anyone who dared to question the unscientific assertions that Love Canal was a disaster was vilified for not caring about sick children. The government evacuated everyone from the Love Canal neighborhood. Hysterical reporting in local and national media spread the terror. Even decades later, opinion polls showed that Americans thought toxic waste dumps were the number one environmental problem—although many other environmental problems are actually more dangerous.

    Societies are vulnerable to bad cascades because cascades in general are evolutionarily helpful. Because an individual can’t know everything, she usually increases her chances of survival by copying the behaviour of others. In the aggregate, a group of people often knows more than any single individual. Mimetic herding—doing as others do—can be a good shortcut in decision-making. “When in Rome, do as the Romans do,” according to a saying attributed to St. Augustine. If you live in Milan and are visiting Rome, then fast on the days when Romans fast. Copying the Romans when in Rome will help your reputation among the Romans. Besides, food markets in Rome won’t be open on Roman fast days, so you might as well go along.

    The more you know

    Cascades that lead to foolish choices are typically driven by a lack of complete information. We all lean heavily on cognitive shortcuts—“heuristics”—in evaluating our world. The availability heuristic is a mental shortcut whereby the perceived likelihood of any given event is tied to the ease with which it can be brought to mind. Thus, the probability assessments we make are often based on our ability to recall relevant examples.

    If a physician has recent experience with a particular medical condition, the physician is more likely to diagnose the same condition for other patients. Likewise, consumers’ self-reported ease in recalling product failure is correlated with their judgment of the likelihood of the product failing. For example, if you remember that your best friend’s KIA broke down last year, but you forget that a workplace acquaintance’s Ford had a similar problem that year, you may think that Fords are more reliable than KIAs …” End Quote

    For far more of this article see:
    https://quillette.com/2020/10/26/how-availability-cascades-are-shaping-our-politics/

  10. James Wyatt Whitehead V

    I checked on the staff of a number of Virginia newspapers. The staff of newspapers appears to be Anglo Saxon statewide. I did not check them all. It looks like the gatekeepers are still entrenched in the realm of print/web journalism.

    • Wow, not just white, or European, but Anglo Saxon! That’s really drilling down into useless demographic detail….Keep the damn Celts, Franks, Normans and Romans out of this! No Norsemen, either! I ain’t no freaking Anglo-Saxon….them’s fighting words!

  11. Why are you doing this? You checking if they are Jews as TMT has day be? Does being a White Anglo Saxon Protestant make you a better, more trustworthy editor? Whitehead. You scare the fucking shit out of me. As I told Bacon and Haner, I am making sure that Lowell Feld and the AntiDefamation league see this. What you want? Another Holocaust?

    • They got bigger fish to fry…

    • James Wyatt Whitehead V

      Tranquilize yourself Mr. Peter. All I did was look at some of our state newspapers to see what kind of writing staff they have. It looks like a lot of white reporters to me. I was surprised. I expected to see some diversity. I hope that our papers will seek the diversity. It would be good for journalism. No I don’t want another Holocaust? That is crazy talk. If modern journalists are going to hold others such as VMI to standards they ought to be leading by example. I was surprised to find that many papers do not.

  12. Gee, thanks Steve. But at the end of the day you are just a Republican apparatchik who has never worked outside of Virginia

  13. Buh-bye Stoney! Waste of stone and ink.

    “Biographical history, as taught in our public schools, (and repeated at this site ad nausea, intended) is still largely a history of boneheads: ridiculous kings and queens, paranoid political leaders, compulsive voyagers, ignorant generals — the flotsam and jetsam of historical currents. The men who radically altered history, the great scientists and mathematicians are seldom mentioned, if at all.” — Martin Gardner

    Men will commit atrocities as long as they believe absurdities

  14. Hey white boys. Maybe we can get for females, transgenders, diverse here. I hate to have to constantly have to face down this white boy end of our White Western Civilization. Boring. Let’s hope Trump loses and we can go to a better future without our tax funds going to Mar O Lag.

    • Just so you sad pathetic souls (like me) who read this deep into the comments know, Peter really did file some complaint somewhere with somebody accusing Bacon and me of antisemitism. For a comment TMT made and we both challenged. I’m not sure who the hell “[email protected]” is, or if he really has some role in the ADL, but I was copied on the following email:

      “Lowell, this is a new low at BR and I find the antisemitism shocking. Now they are publishing Post editors and identifying if they look like Jews. Peter.” With Jim and I copied on the message…..

      Of course, since I “never worked outside of Virginia” my mind is clearly inferior, but I suspect any outsider looking at this will see it was TMT made the comment in question, and if you are seeking real antisemitism in it it will be hard to find. But of course the threat of a hassle and opening us up to personal attacks is standard tactics for political terrorists like Peter. (He studied in Russia.) Now I better go check Twitter. At the very least I need to watch Blue Virginia now… Frankly I got out before, got back into this mess after a similar run in with this person a while back, said I’d see, and HERE WE GO AGAIN. I’ll find another way to pass the time during Lockdown # 2. I’ve got a column in the Fredericksburg paper next week and the Thomas Jefferson Institute will publish it. But not here. Done with here.

  15. Hey TMT, haner and Bacon. Are just going to pretend TMT’s anti-Semitic comments in Jim’s photo WaPo masthead never happened? Or is it going to be Jim Bacon’s “who? Me? I’m a libertarian. Or maybe Haner’s beloved role as Cardinal Richelieu? How about TMT?

    • Think hard about lawyering up.

      • Hollow much? Seriously? Doesn’t one have to have a reputation to defend to consider defending a reputation? Steve, having sold your soul as a lobbyist, you should accept this as a badge of courage.

        Richelieu? You should be so blessed.

    • Peter, the comment was not anti-Semitic. I happen to believe that the reason so many Jewish people have succeeded in life is hard work and inherent intelligence. They, like the Asians at TJ HS, have earned their success. But if society uses intelligence, skill, talent, years of study and the like to measure and reward success in any field, be it science, medicine, art, basketball or even journalism, you won’t have these fields look like society.

      If society wants its professions, job categories, the NFL, the NY Philharmonic Orchestra, etc., to look like America’s, New York’s, Metro D.C., or Fairfax County, it must throw out the focus on intelligence, skill, talent, years of study and the like to measure and reward success in any field and use some other measure, quotas, holistic reviews, lotteries to award success. But you aren’t likely to have the best at the top. Do you want a dentist who didn’t take any tests?

      The Post, always on its moral high horse, has pointed out that TJ’s membership doesn’t reflect the County’s demographics and needs to come up with new admission standards.

      So BR raises the issue of whether the top positions at the Post reflect the area’s demographics. I took it beyond race and entered the apparent forbidden field of ethno-religious heritage. Needless to say, you didn’t address that issue, you toss around anti-Semitic. A fine way for you to avoid the hard issues of merit and quotas.

      Take it to religion if you wish. The same point, raised by by the Pew Foundation, pops up. If religion is immaterial, why this? https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/politics/114th-house-religions/

      The Post’s top positions don’t reflect the demographics of the region or the nation or even its news side of the house. Can’t go there, retorts the left. Yet, how many stories have we heard that the Supreme Court was too Catholic. Same profession; different standards.

      If the Post pokes institutions for not reflecting the area’s demographics, why isn’t it fair game to point out the Post doesn’t either, most especially if one looks at the very people doing the poking? I guess that issue is too sensitive for a “journalist” to address. It’s easier to ignore arguments and call names.

      • “Take it to religion if you wish. The same point, raised by by the Pew Foundation, pops up. If religion is immaterial, why this? https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/politics/114th-house-religions/

        TMT, and Pew Foundation raise a hugely important point: the original and continuing deep and pervasive impact of religion on the human species and human history, from its beginnings right up to modern times.

        In this regard there is a new, and I believe seminal book of cutting edge scholarship just out on this vitality important and timely subject that increasingly we ignore and take for granted at our peril. The book is:

        The Weirdest People in the World (How the West Became Psychologically peculiar and particularly Prosperous). It’s author is Joseph Henrich, Chair of The Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University.

        This book has great relevance to our better understanding of the cultural issues and conflicts that we are discussing now with such fervor on this BR blog, and offers insights into how we might better address these issues. It’s the most important topic of the day, I think.

  16. My apologies. Explanation accepted.

  17. And, as per usual, Peter ignores tough questions, such as how do you put quotas or use non-rigorous admission criteria, while not addressing groups that are over-represented under the current system, without necessarily creating other demographic groups that would be under represented? Why can some ethnic groups be considered, while others are lumped together, and be “fair”?

    I guess I must write it off to dealing with a journalist, a profession that is no longer professional.

  18. Well said, TMT. It’s surprising to me that anyone could misread your earlier comment the way it has been here. After all, the very purpose of this post was to answer the question posed by its author: “I got to thinking, how diverse is the Washington Post editorial staff? Does the Post live up to the standards it imposes on others?” As for “Cardinal Richelieu,” SH, I take that as an unintended compliment.

  19. We write deeply saddened by the news that General J.H. Binford Peay (a retired four star general) is stepping down as head of Virginia Military Institute.This on the heels of a series of Washington Post articles by Mr. Ian Shapira. It concerns many that someone like General Peay who served his country honorably and is a highly decorated veteran, someone who has mentored thousands of young men and women from all walks of life has had his reputation called into question.

    First let us make it clear that we should ALL wholeheartedly agree that any of the appalling acts and incidents noted in Mr. Ian Shapira’s articles are unacceptable, and merit a closer look and swift handling.

    But just as we ask about the make up of The Washington Post, what do we know of Mr. Ian Shapira. His articles, compared to others, have not been balanced. And in fact, has Mr. Ian Shapira even actually visited VMI? Or did he take note of the work of Roanoke journalists, taking their contacts?

    Mr. Shapira’s background is relevant. He is a white male whose family earns in the 1 percent, his family having founded Heaven Hill Distillery (Heaven Hill Brands), a company where he is listed as a board member. The worldwide company began in Bardstown, Kentucky, a quaint little town much like the population, charm, and civil war history of Lexington, Virginia. The bourbon industry is well known for sadly and wrongfully being built on the backs of slaves. Heaven Hill distillery, while founded in the last one hundred years, is noted as having a scant percentage of African American employees.

    Further, it is a distillery with a presence in Louisville, Kentucky, a city which has faced significant racial divide and pain this summer following the horrendous shooting and death of Breonna Taylor. Mr. Shapira’s family’s factory can be found in West Louisville where many African Americans have raised generations of their families. His family’s logo and product are on the shelves of many liquor stores in pockets of the city where blocks of buildings are boarded up and industry has failed to be a helpful community partner. Further, at the time protests broke out in Louisville, and around the country, distilleries were called out for failing or being among the last to make public statements on racial injustice. Heaven Hill among them, was slow to point out the injustices of racism and the need for change.

    And in 2014, his family’s distillery was noted to be a major polluter in West Louisville, again an area known to be home to many African American families. In light of news coverage, the family began to invest in West Louisville.

    It is also interesting that Mr. Shapira has chosen schools that have small African American student bodies – Louisville Collegiate (statistic unavailable), Princeton (9%) and American University (7%).

    Again, in addition to being a Washington Post reporter, Mr. Ian Shapira is heir to one of the wealthiest families/fortunes in Kentucky and he holds a position at Heaven Hill Board.

    Countless men and women have left VMI to serve their countries for over nearly two centuries. Countless have died while serving their country. Others have notedly been leaders in the Civil Rights Movement, like Jonathan Daniels, who died while taking a stand and protecting others.

    This reporter has wielded his pen depicting that VMI is a bastion of the old south, which it is not. He has done this all while being a member of a family often depicted in the very same light, which is likely untrue as well. All things should be fair and balanced.

    https://www.kentucky.com/news/business/article167475802.html

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/parenting/wp/2014/06/11/my-dad-died-one-month-before-my-daughter-was-born-here-is-how-my-family-honors-him/

    https://apnews.com/article/ad9b4c411e964518960ef2e334c1b10c

    https://www.diffordsguide.com/producers/587/heaven-hill-distilleries-inc/history

    https://vinepair.com/articles/heaven-hill-distillery/

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/people/ian-shapira/

    https://everipedia.org/wiki/lang_en/ian-shapira

    https://www.courier-journal.com/story/news/local/2018/01/16/heaven-hill-investments-west-louisville-nonprofits/1024012001/

    https://washingtoncitypaper.com/article/186797/black-students-at-american-university-speak-about-experiencing-hate-on-campus/

    https://www.whiskyadvocate.com/whisky-world-responds-to-global-anti-racism-movement/

    .

    • Fascinating background material. We certainly can’t hold Mr. Shapira personally responsible for the deeds/sins of family members. But I find it noteworthy that he comes from wealth. The progeny of many entrepreneurs who built great fortunes feel guilt at their unearned privilege and, in compensation, turn their backs on their values — while happily enjoying the lifestyle that inherited wealth gives them. I have no idea of Mr. Shapira falls into that category. It would be fascinating to know more about him.

Leave a Reply