Grandparents Ask Supreme Court for Justice


Recommendation to readers: Be sure to delve deep enough into the story to read Asra Nomani’s personal story. She describes the values to which Asian-Americans owe their academic success. — JAB

by Asra Q. Nomani

WASHINGTON, D.C. — This past Friday, Dr. Mridula Kumari, 71, walked up the stairs to the U.S. Supreme Court, and soaked in the festive atmosphere on the sidewalk off 1st Avenue S.E. A band played, as children danced and women clapped, pumping their hands in the air to the beat, one woman in New Balance sneakers carrying a bag that read, “Our Rights. Our Future. Our Power. Our Courts.”

As war waged across the world in Ukraine, a people trying to defend their future, their rights, their nation, Dr. Kumari understood well the power of those words. The courts can protect the rights of the citizenry. The courts can pave a path to a better future. The courts can empower the citizenry.

She hoped these protections would also be extended to her granddaughter: a first-generation American and a seventh grader in Fairfax County Public Schools, across the Potomac River in the northern Virginia suburbs of the nation’s capital. As the daughter of immigrants from India, her granddaughter faces a new racism in America: an anti-Asian admissions process to schools, including Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, a school fondly known as TJ.

That afternoon, as new Supreme Court Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson celebrated her confirmation in a ceremony at the White House, attorneys for Pacific Legal Foundation, a civil rights group, filed an emergency application with U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts to overturn, or “vacate,” the stay, stopping the Fairfax County school system from continuing its illegal admissions process to TJ.

Chief Justice Roberts immediately instructed the school board to respond to the emergency application, a good sign, experts say, that he is taking the application seriously. Chief Justice Roberts can decide whether or not to vacate the stay himself, or he can refer the issue to the entire U.S. Supreme Court.

As an expert attorney explained: The process we’re going through now is an emergency process—often called the “shadow docket”—designed specifically for instances like this where there’s an urgent problem and there isn’t time to wait for the normal appeal to run its course. There is no oral argument in this emergency process and very limited briefing. Normally, parties get months to file their briefs. The school board got five days in this case, their response due Wednesday at the close of business. Also, the issue is limited to just whether the stay should be vacated. No decision will be made on the merits.

‘Anti asian…lol’

In late March, 4th Circuit Federal Judge Claude Hilton issued the “merits decision” that the admissions process is unconstitutional and anti-Asian. He included in his ruling a permanent injunction forbidding the school board from continuing to use the admissions process. The evidence was damning, including a text message from school board member Abrar Omeish, admitting the admissions changes were “anti asian….lol.”

A week later, the judge denied the school system a “stay” on the judgment pending appeal, but, stubbornly, Fairfax County lawyers filed an appeal to that decision with the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals and won a stay in a split 2-1 decision. That means it can select its next freshman class for this coming fall 2022 using its illegal process. It also filed an appeal on the merits decision.

On Friday, Pacific Legal Foundation attorneys filed the emergency petition to null the stay and stop the unconstitutional admissions process.

A pioneer as a physician in her native India, Dr. Kumari trusted the United States years ago with her son, just out of undergraduate studies, to forge a future for himself and, later, his family. She had missed him deeply but surrendered her faith to America. It troubled her when she heard that school district officials had eliminated the race-blind, merit-based math and science admissions tests to the school in December 2020 and replaced the tests with a new squishy system that included “bonus points” that have nothing to do with academics and are really proxies for race.

‘Anything is possible’

Friday afternoon, across town, at the White House, a beaming Justice Jackson said that “our children are telling me that they see now, more than ever, that, here in America, anything is possible.”

Is “anything” truly possible when a system is allowed to continue even though a federal judge has established it as illegal, unconstitutional and anti-Asian?

Would “anything” have been possible if White Southern Democrats in the “Massive Resistance,” a political machine led by Sen. Harry Byrd in the 1950s, had been able to successfully stop integration of K-12 public schools after the landmark 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision, Brown v. Board of Education?

No. “Anything” would not have been possible. That is why the Fairfax County School Board is the new “Massive Resistance” to equal protection under the law in the 21st century. That is why Coalition for TJ v. Fairfax County School Board is as historic as Brown v. Board of Education for our 21st century.

And that is why U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Roberts should side with Dr. Kumari and her granddaughter. Beside her, her husband, Suresh Kumar, a retired mechanical engineer, stepped forward to say, “United States is great because it gives equal opportunity.”

He added: “That tradition should continue. Everybody — whatever it is — should get equal opportunity.”

Who can disagree with that? That is the spirit that brought a mother, Suparna Dutta, standing next to the grandparents, as a young graduate student from India to Tennessee to study.

“Immigrants like me flock to this country because they believe this nation is a nation of laws,” she said. Dutta had a son at TJ.

Asra Nomani and her father Zafar

Nearby, my father, Zafar Nomani, 88, was one of those immigrants. He had just looked up at the West Pediment, as it’s called, above the looming columns at the front entrance of the U.S. Supreme Court, where these words were engraved into the marble: “EQUAL JUSTICE UNDER LAW.”

“We are going for equal justice,” said my father, wearing a red Coalition for TJ baseball cap. “That is the purpose of Supreme Court. To listen.”

Arriving in the United States in 1965 as a Ph.D. student at Rutgers University, my father fell in love with the opportunities the U.S. offered us, with hard work as the country’s — and our family’s — ethos. When my mother, older brother and I went to India for a summer visit when I was in elementary school, my father surprised us on our return with a special gift: a complete multi-volume set of Encyclopedia Britannica. It was a family treasure that my family moved with us in our green Rambler as we settled in Morgantown, W.V., in the foothills of the Appalachian mountains.

I grew up in public school, competing seriously with a classmate named Michael Roh for the Scholarship Award, for highest GPA in eighth grade at Suncrest Junior High School. Michael, to his credit, went on to become an award-winning physics teacher at local University High School.

There is a lot said today about the “cultural values” that allow Asian students to do well academically.

One point is made that Asian families have the highest rates of two-parent households, compared to all other racial groups. But it’s more complicated than that. We also have extended family — like the three grandparents standing before the Supreme Court.

In 2002, I had my son as a single mother, my son’s father never taking a role in his life, but it was my parents who stepped in to co-parent my son. My son was able to graduate from TJ in the Class of 2021 because my father moved in with us, walking our dog, Lily, when we couldn’t, making biryani — a dish from India with rice — with chicken and too much on the spices, sending my son to the kitchen for water.

My son’s freshman year, when I took an overnight job to make ends meet, my father would awaken early to make fried eggs for my son and drive him to the school bus stop. He would stand on strip side to cheer my son at fencing tournaments. My son knew stability and support from morning until night, even when I was working.

This is a support we have to give all parents in society, and we cannot punish Asian families as “ravenous,” “resource hoarders,” “white adjacent” and “toxic” — as activists and education officials have done in Fairfax County.

We may sacrifice vacations for sets of Encyclopedia Britannica and after-school tutors but that doesn’t make us illegal as the former Virginia Education Secretary, Atif Qarni, implied when he compared test preparation to illegal performance enhancement drugs.

‘Irreparable harm’

Fairfax County Public Schools claims it can’t test students quickly enough and  that it would be inconvenient to test them. That’s the school board being lazy once again.

This is what our lawyers say:

“Not only did the panel majority wade into an area of legal uncertainty on the merits, but it disregarded clear precedent that mere expenditures of time, effort, and money, however inconvenient, do not amount to irreparable harm.” (page 2)

Our parents have called testing companies around the country. The results are clear. FCPS could give a nationally-normed test in a few days’ time and get results almost immediately. Its lawyers are making excuses so that they can continue their racist policy, subjecting two years of applicants to unfairly be the target of an illegal process.

Our lawyers also assert clearly:

“It also gave short shrift to both the public interest in not enforcing unconstitutional policies and the interests of Asian-American students who will be forced to endure another year of harm. … .In these circumstances, the panel majority’s grant of a stay permitting the Board to continue to implement an admissions policy that has been declared unconstitutional was demonstrably wrong.” (page 2)

Our lawyers conclude:

“Unless the stay is vacated, hundreds of Asian-American applicants to TJ, including children of Coalition members, will be forced to compete for seats at TJ in a system intended to discriminate against them because of their race. … Because admissions decisions are imminent, the Coalition respectfully asks the Chief Justice, in his capacity as Circuit Justice for the Fourth Circuit, to vacate the stay pending appeal and reinstate the district court’s injunction.” (page 2)

It was my honor to stand with another mother and these three grandparents — symbols of the best of what our Asian culture and our world — values. As Dr. Kumari walked away from the U.S. Supreme Court, the festivities continuing, she beamed because it is in America that she has hope and trust that justice will indeed be served for her granddaughter — and all children — with “EQUAL JUSTICE UNDER LAW.”

This column has been republished with permission from Asra Investigates.


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59 responses to “Grandparents Ask Supreme Court for Justice”

  1. vicnicholls Avatar
    vicnicholls

    Please Lord, let the TJ parents win.

  2. LarrytheG Avatar
    LarrytheG

    This is essentially about kids of higher income parents getting the instruction they need to succeed at the higher academic levels.

    Only 2% of low income kids get admitted to TJ – and that includes the Asians.

    A lot of kids of higher income parents regardless of ethnicity get tutoring and academic boot camps and the such that boost their academics so they can compete and get admitted.

    Higher Income Asians that immigrate to NoVa are pursuing the best for their kids not that different from higher-income parents in general who locate near the better neighborhood schools and get their kids the help and tutoring they need to succeed academically.

    Not all Asian kids across the rest of Virginia, the lower income Asians, do not do as well as the higher income Asian kids in NoVa.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f58f90207e01fcd265291f9f3e09fa143e14266060432861ceea81253f09b8d9.jpg

    1. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
      James Wyatt Whitehead

      Fairfax has the wealth to invest in a “readiness curriculum” that targets underrepresented subgroups. It will take some time, patience, hard work but it will put more of our subgroups on an equal playing field with our highly achieving subgroups.

      1. LarrytheG Avatar
        LarrytheG

        So the expectation is for Fairfax to provide equivalent education resources for low income kids (who demonstrate potential) so that by the time they get to the time to compete for TJ, they will have academic parity?

        1. DJRippert Avatar
          DJRippert

          That would be a vastly better plan than the overtly racist, incompetent lottery system.

          1. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            Lottery systems are not racist. They use them in the Success Academies in NYC and in some Charter Schools when there are more applicants than spaces.

            It’s not racist to set minimum standards for acceptance then have a system to allocate available spaces to all who do qualify.

            If you world , the only folks who get into college are the ones with the highest QCAs and others who have good QCAs but not the top , don’t get accepted.

            What’s weird is for a Judge to decide on who can get accepted or not.

          2. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
            James Wyatt Whitehead

            The Fairfax admission policy for TJ puts both thumbs on the scale to even things out. It is not working. There is clear evidence of a need for basic remediation just to survive the challenging math and science courses. I think the test scores due out this summer will demonstrate this.

          3. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            Well, they see a serious problem where kids of higher income kids get the advanced education they need and kids who don’t have high income parents do not.

            And I probably agree that the current approach really does not solve the core problem for the low-income kids and it looks really bad to toss kids who ARE qualified and even worse when it’s one race like Asians.

            Having said that, I don’t think a judge has the background in education needed to really understand the different things that might be done – or not.

            I’m not sure a lottery is illegal, the appeal courts will opine on it.

          4. DJRippert Avatar
            DJRippert

            Lotteries are racist when their intent is to reduce the number of Asian students in favor of other ethnic groups.

          5. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            that’s not their intent though. That’s the lie that those who want to stoke racial division are telling.

            Lotteries are to assure that all races get an equal chance regardless of their income level.

        2. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
          James Wyatt Whitehead

          Absolutely. They love taxes in Fairfax. Make them spend it where it counts. It will actually serve the people and the liberal policies in a most honest way.

          1. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            if they start tomorrow , it will take a decade to start with the 1st graders.

            This is an emblematic problem across many Va schools. They simply don’t offer the courses that talented kids need to reach their potential and especially so in low-income neighborhood schools.

            If Youngkin is truly serious – this is something he could identify and advocate for. Perhaps these LAB schools WILL offer higher academic tracks for the kids that qualify and need it to reach their academic potential.

          2. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
            James Wyatt Whitehead

            If they start in the fall, those 6th graders can be ready. 3 years. It can be done.

      2. VaNavVet Avatar

        If Asra believes in justice under the law then she should be willing to abide by the decision of the courts. Further, she and her group should get behind just such hard work as you describe.

    2. LarrytheG Avatar
      LarrytheG

      Here’s Fairfax county data for Asians – including low income:

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/69aa7bb257846323a3a4ec90d0e3ceaac437b1c38847a29ca9244870dba17736.jpg

      1. f/k/a_tmtfairfax Avatar
        f/k/a_tmtfairfax

        What is the definition of “disadvantaged” and who determines whether a student is disadvantaged or not? Based on what facts?

        I dealt with FCPS staff for decades. It is the most consistently dishonest organization with which I’ve dealt since I graduated from law school in the mid-1970s.

        1. LarrytheG Avatar
          LarrytheG

          Disadvantaged is a standard set external to Fairfax.

          If you have dealt with a school system for decades and are a lawyer and don’t know the definition of economically disadvantaged, I’m surprised. It’s US code:

          https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b4010c2451a8cb81c2540b24e6429c10e8b254b04cff62db7f5f035063bc488a.jpg

          https://www.lawinsider.com/dictionary/economically-disadvantaged-student

          ” The report also found that Asian Americans tended to live in tracts that were more affluent than those of other minorities. For example, the Brambleton area of Loudoun County is one of the 20 wealthiest tracts in Northern Virginia, with a median household income of $198,680. In that tract, Asians make up 46 percent of the population, and whites account for 40 percent.”

          https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/tucked-inside-wealthy-northern-virginia-are-pockets-of-poverty-report-says/2017/11/28/71ec1500-d447-11e7-a986-d0a9770d9a3e_story.html

          1. f/k/a_tmtfairfax Avatar
            f/k/a_tmtfairfax

            Knowing FCPS staff, it could readily label someone disadvantaged based on race or ethnic background alone. These people make Donald Trump appear to be George Washington and the Cherry Tree.

            Why are you pointing to Brambleton in Loudoun County?

          2. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            TMT – they can’t “label” someone – they have to follow the standards just like any other school system.

            why do you insist on conspiracy theories when the facts don’t support your view?

            Brambleton – read that article TMT – it explains it.

          3. f/k/a_tmtfairfax Avatar
            f/k/a_tmtfairfax

            Give me a break. FCPS staff does whatever it damn well pleases to get the results it wants. For example, in response to probing questions about its proposed budgets, FCPS has periodically changed the manner in which it displays budgets from year to year such that the public has trouble comparing information year to year.

            FCPS purposely identified staff positions as required by the State’s SOQ even though they were not a part of the SOQ rather than trying to justify the added positions. This occurred on multiple occasions.

            Some time ago, the Fairfax County BoS directed the County operations and the Schools to use a single inhouse printing department. FCPS generally refused to use the combined department whenever possible, running up multi-millions in added costs for outside printing.

            This is not conspiracy theory. It’s real-life corruption and misrepresentation.

    3. f/k/a_tmtfairfax Avatar
      f/k/a_tmtfairfax

      Larry, you have no facts to support your statements about income. And you fail to address the higher percentage of married households among Asian families. Most tutoring programs cost several hundred dollars to a thousand or so. And Fairfax County Public Schools have offered free, comparable tutoring for gifted students coming from low-income families for years. Every time I proffer those facts, you ignore them and claim low-income kids have no access to additional help. They do. Some take advantage; others don’t.

      I agree that a lottery system or setting aside a minimum number of slots for each middle school for qualified students are also fair ways to address admissions. The problem with FCPS is that they abolished the admissions test with bureaucratic BS. FCPS is engaged in unconstitutional discrimination based on race. Hell, FCPS is teaching remedial math and science at TJ to “qualified” students who don’t have a mastery of basic math and science.

      If FCPS wants to make decisions based on race, it first needs to admit that it has previously and consistently discriminated based on race. It won’t do that because the educrats want to hold their heads high and would never admit to racial discrimination. Moreover, such an admission would result in class actions by black and Hispanic parents.

      1. LarrytheG Avatar
        LarrytheG

        TMT – when you say you offer “facts” you need to provide the data to back them up.

        Are you so sure that ALL schools in Fairfax even the ones in low income neighborhoods offer all the programs and courses that schools in more affluent neighborhoods do and beyond that – the tutoring and boot camp schools that affluent parents buy for their kids that the schools do not pay for – for low income kids.

        Remember also when you talk about races and low income and parents that there are numbers of Asians who are low income also – who do not get into TJ either. Only 2% of low income Asians and other races get into TJ also.

        The tropes about one-parent families are dog whistles in my view. 50% of all marriages fail – but if one parent makes a decent income, and live in a good neighborhood their kids do well. But if single parent mom has a terrible education and works for minimum wage – it’s different. Both moms are one parent so the one-parent trope is just wrong.

        1. f/k/a_tmtfairfax Avatar
          f/k/a_tmtfairfax

          Larry, every single high school in Fairfax County offers either an AP or an IB program. Everyone. Moreover, there is open enrollment for these programs. Thus, a kid at Marshall HS (IB) who wants to take AP courses instead can take them at McLean HS for example. And vice versa. Any kid qualified kid can take AP or IB irrespective of where she/he lives.

          And the Division provides transportation to and from the other school. My son took Korean language classes at Fairfax HS. Langley accommodated his class schedule, and he was given school bus service between the two schools. The same goes for IB-AP switches and for any other specialized courses such as vocational education.

          One more time, FCPS offers additional support services (i.e., tutoring) to lower income students with potential for, and interest in, TJHSST. There are no reasons why a talented, interested and committed kid from a low-income family cannot make it into TJ.

          The concept that every lower-income family is a victim of society is false. Some families have had bad luck or faced bad situations, sometimes for multiple generations. But others simply lack intelligence and/or make bad decisions that keep them in the low-income bracket.

    4. DJRippert Avatar
      DJRippert

      TJ is not an AP course. It is (or was) the best high school in America. There are 58,641 high school students in public high schools in Fairfax County. There are 1,069 in Thomas Jefferson. That’s 1.8% of the total FCPS high school students enrolled in TJ.

      This has nothing to do with pass rates for English.

      It has to do with taking the very top students, the ones who work the hardest, study the most and rewarding their scholarship and effort.

      If this were just about wealth – Asians wouldn’t dominate TJ. There are a lot more wealthy White people in Fairfax County than wealthy Asian people (because there are a lot more White people than Asian people).

      I’m sorry Larry but Asra Nomani is right. Asian Americans take scholarship and hard work much more seriously than any other racial group.

      1. LarrytheG Avatar
        LarrytheG

        did you look at the pass/fail rates for math?

        Have you seen how many low income kids are in TJ?

        This is very much about wealth, Higher income Asians (like Doctors) emigrate to the US and settle in NoVa where they fully intend to give their kids the best chance to succeed.

        If you look at low income Asians , their scores, can you explain why they are so low compared to Asians that are not low income?

        What’s true is that higher income Asians do take scholarship very seriously. What is not true is that all Asians do and especially do low income Asians.

        1. DJRippert Avatar
          DJRippert

          TJ is not a pass/fail issue. Stop using irrelevant arguments. It’s about the top 2% of students in the largest school system in the state. None of these students have ever failed a standardized test. Not one.

          Your argument, properly stated in the context of TJ, is that only the wealthy can afford he pre-test review programs required to ace the difficult entrance exam into TJ.

          The refutation of that argument is that Asians are not 70% of the wealthiest families in Fairfax County. Not even close. If TJ admissions were based solely or heavily on wealth then Whites would be the majority at TJ because White families are the majority of wealthy families in the county.

          Your argument on economics and education makes sense in certain circumstances but not in the case of TJ.

          1. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            When only 2% of those in TJ are low income, what does that have to do with what percentage are wealthy?

            FYI – only 2% of low income whites are at TJ also.

            BTW – look at this chart to see who is wealthy:

            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/161737f5785d83e3ab9779c12a826f06ab3c763f8e48319c799a620ff42bb626.jpg

          2. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            DJ – here are the facts:

            only 2% of low income get into TJ – and that includes Asians:

            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/161737f5785d83e3ab9779c12a826f06ab3c763f8e48319c799a620ff42bb626.jpg

        2. killerhertz Avatar
          killerhertz

          Every culture has different values. This is a fact. Asian cultures do not value sports to the degree that others do, which is why you see less representation at the professional level.

      2. VaNavVet Avatar

        Perhaps FCPS should decide that having TJ as a magnet school is just not worth the effort and expense and it should be a regular high school offering AP courses. Since it only serves less than 2% of the high school population, the taxpayers of the county might well not actually support it as it has traditionally been configured. It might be time for a voter referendum.

  3. walter smith Avatar
    walter smith

    Larry One Note.
    Costanza Rule applies. If Larry says it, the opposite is true.

    1. Stephen Haner Avatar
      Stephen Haner

      Known that for years now.

      1. LarrytheG Avatar
        LarrytheG

        talk about one-note – the two biggest who blather willful ignorance on a regular basis!

  4. Dick Hall-Sizemore Avatar
    Dick Hall-Sizemore

    So, if these kids do not gain admission to TJ, they will “be forced to endure another year of harm” by having to attend other public high schools in Fairfax County, which are ranked among the best in the state and the nation. This is “harm” ?

    1. Nancy Naive Avatar
      Nancy Naive

      The competition for any affirmation action (that’s what this is) will be in the least qualified appointments. In fact, it could be argued that it is only the last appointment.

    2. DJRippert Avatar
      DJRippert

      The “harm” is that the Asian students earned their places at TJ through hard work and attention to scholarship via a color blind entrance exam. What is the “harm” to the kids who didn’t make the cut with the color blind entrance exam? They have to attend those same Fairfax County high schools where they will be in various advanced placement programs?

      TJ is an elite school. Less than the top 2% of students in the public school system in the county attend. I see nothing wrong with a competitive, fair entrance exam. The fact that Asian students dominate those exams is a testament to the devotion of those students to hard work, scholarship and success.

      Only in the minds of liberals would a group of students of color differentially succeeding in a fair and competitive process be seen as a problem.

      1. LarrytheG Avatar
        LarrytheG

        It’s only about “liberals” because of those that want to make this a cultural wedge issue which is par for the course today for Conservatives who prefer false narratives to facts.

        The simple reality, backed up by facts is:

        1. – only 2% of students at TJ come from low income families

        2.- Asians have the highest median income in NoVa and Virginia – higher than whites and almost twice what black median income is.

        These are facts.

        Affluent parents provide the education resources their kids need to outcompete other kids and get into TJ.

        I’m not saying it’s a bad thing for parents to do – not at all – any of us with kids would do that probably.

        But it’s a fact about the incomes and the benefit those incomes have to the kids of the affluent.

        1. f/k/a_tmtfairfax Avatar
          f/k/a_tmtfairfax

          Once again, you ignore the fact that FCPS offers special help to qualified and interested students from low-income homes who want to go to TJ. The suggestion that lower-income students are at an academic advantage is simply false. Why doesn’t free help for lower-income students match paid help from the parents of higher-income students. Moreover, there are likely many lower-income parents who make the financial sacrifice to pay for tutoring for their kids.

          1. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            Fairfax may well offer special help but not near enough of it to enough low income – such that only 2% of TJ’s enrollment are low-income – all races from Asian to Black – 2%.

            How is the 2% explained if “many low income parents make the financial sacrifice to pay for tutoring”.

            You keep claiming false things are being claimed. I agree.

  5. LarrytheG Avatar
    LarrytheG

    Here’s relevant data about which kids get into TJ since we know that only 2% of low income kids get into TJ – for all races including Asians:

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/8659d466390578021fc6d2f221f020edb8565347de898bcde5cc9bfb23e97c91.jpg

    1. DJRippert Avatar
      DJRippert

      Once again, wrong! Median household income is not the measure as to why Asians hold 70+% of the competitive places at TJ. Asians would have to constitute 70% of the wealthy applicants for it to be a pure wealth question. And 70% of Asians are not wealthy.

  6. Nancy Naive Avatar
    Nancy Naive

    Remember, the top doesn’t see a bump. It’s the last appointments where preferences are employed.

    The tax which will be paid for the purpose of education is not more than the thousandth part of what will be paid to kings, priests, and nobles who will rise up among us if we leave the people in ignorance. -Thomas Jefferson, third US president, architect, and author (13 Apr 1743-1826)

    Well, we’ve screwed that up.

  7. Nancy Naive Avatar
    Nancy Naive

    Remember, the top doesn’t see a bump. It’s the last appointments where preferences are employed.

    The tax which will be paid for the purpose of education is not more than the thousandth part of what will be paid to kings, priests, and nobles who will rise up among us if we leave the people in ignorance. -Thomas Jefferson, third US president, architect, and author (13 Apr 1743-1826)

    Well, we’ve screwed that up.

  8. LarrytheG Avatar
    LarrytheG

    off to do some volunteer work for the low income today. Won’t be back until late or tomorrow!

  9. killerhertz Avatar
    killerhertz

    Diversity for the sake of diversity is overrated. Change my mind.

    1. Nancy Naive Avatar
      Nancy Naive

      What other purpose would you propose? I mean aside from societal harmony and growth, that is.

      1. killerhertz Avatar
        killerhertz

        You realize that universities and woke companies have quotas for no sake other than equality of representation based on color/gender/intersectionalist category right?

        1. Nancy Naive Avatar
          Nancy Naive

          Fine. There are places in this country that are 95% white, just north and west of Dallas for example. You’d be happy there.

  10. Stephen Haner Avatar
    Stephen Haner

    So when teaching in a Chesterfield center-based gifted middle school, and then at a Richmond private, my wife ran the MathCounts competition and prepped the school teams. Those Fairfax feeder schools into TJ were the competition, and often dominant (but her teams were still competitive at the state finals.) Frankly, over the years, if you saw the team lists, it was “her Asians” against “their Asians,” as the drive and the talent were the same in those families here in the Richmond area.

    1. LarrytheG Avatar
      LarrytheG

      kids of higher income kids often live in more affluent neighborhoods that usually have better schools with more programs. But the parents of those kids also pay for tutoring, special boot camp schools and even private schools.

      And in the end, if one looks at the income levels of the kids who get into those schools, they are not often lower income.

      The bottom line is that kids of more affluent parents have access to education resources that kids of lower income parents often do not and over time , years in school, kids of more affluent parents have attained higher levels of academic achievement which then sets them up for the magnet schools. They simply outcompete the lower income kids who just don’t have the academic achievement necessary to perform in a magnet school.

      If you look at the median income of Asians in Virginia, it is higher than any other race.

      Higher incomes = better access to education resources for their kids.

      1. Stephen Haner Avatar
        Stephen Haner

        The other half of the story about that gifted program and MathCounts, and I’ve mentioned this before, is the talented black student who was under constant harassment from her black peers for “acting white” by succeeding in school. This is cultural, not a poverty thing. This is what the culture values.

    2. Nancy Naive Avatar
      Nancy Naive

      Genectic superiority?

      Civilization rises and falls on its math skills.

      1. LarrytheG Avatar
        LarrytheG

        Yep, for sure, and if it stokes more racial division, super!

      2. DJRippert Avatar
        DJRippert

        Cultural superiority. Civilization rises and falls on the emphasis families place on education.

        1. LarrytheG Avatar
          LarrytheG

          like there is no such thing as lower income Asians who do not attain high levels of education and income?

          The Asians we see in the US are often and typically immigrants who are already educated and wealthy.

          In the countries they emigrated, most of the others are much poorer – millions and millions of uneducated and poor.

          The educated and wealthy immigrate to places like NoVa where the median income for Asians is higher than all other races.

        2. Nancy Naive Avatar
          Nancy Naive

          Families? If left just to families, we’ll have the best tire biters. We see “family” interest in the banning of books and subjects.

        3. killerhertz Avatar
          killerhertz

          And emphasis on the family itself, which is also under attack.

  11. Nancy Naive Avatar
    Nancy Naive

    FWIW, …
    Reminder to register: William & Mary Asian Centennial Day Alumni Reception!
    SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 2022 | 2-4 P.M.

    Please join William & Mary Asian, Pacific Islander, Middle Eastern/Southwest Asian (APIM) alumni for a reception at Culture Café between the 11 a.m. Art Matsu Arcade Dedication and the 6 p.m. Asian Centennial gala fundraiser (see details below). At the reception, meet members of the APIM Alumni Leadership Circle and discover how you can get involved as they launch the APIM alumni board.

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