Why the Need to Slant Stonewall Jackson’s Legacy?

Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson’s mixed legacy — slaveholder, educator of slaves, rebel against the United States, and one of the greatest military commanders in U.S. history.

by Donald Smith

If you were asked to describe Stonewall Jackson in just a few words, what would you say? Apparently the Washington Post would say — an enslaver of six people.

Ian Shapira, a member of the Washington Post’s Metro section, is the paper’s most prolific writer on the ongoing controversy at VMI over allegations of systemic racism and controversies over Confederate symbols at the school. The Post’s biography of Shapira credits his work for having “prompted,” among other things, “the removal of the campus’ 108-year-old statue of Confederate statue Gen. Stonewall Jackson.”

Shapira has mentioned Jackson frequently. But, if you relied on his reporting to give you the information that you’d use to develop your perception of Jackson and his legacy, you’d end up with a shallow, one-sided view. What’s worse — and actually more troubling — your knowledge of the general would be missing some of the most important aspects of his life and legacy.

Shapira has used the phrase “an enslaver of six people” to describe Stonewall Jackson in his reporting in seven different articles, since September 9th of last year. (He also referred to Stonewall as an “enslaver” three times.)

The only one of Jackson’s major battles Shapira mentions is Chancellorsville –and only to point out that Jackson was shot by his own troops. He also points out Jackson’s less-than-stellar performance as a teacher.

Here are the things that the primary reporter on an important subject, working for a newspaper that is widely regarded as an institution in American journalism, left out of his coverage of Jackson and his legacy.

  • His excellence on the battlefield. No mention of the Valley Campaign of 1862 at all. No description of Jackson’s daring and dangerous flanking movement at Chancellorsville that led to the rout of the Union Army. Not one word of his march around the flank of John Pope’s Union force near Manassas, or the strong performance of Jackson’s command at Second Manassas. No mention of his command’s stand at First Manassas, which earned him his “Stonewall” nickname. Nothing about Fredericksburg. No mention of Jackson’s fame and renown worldwide, for his battlefield accomplishments. If you relied on Shapira’s reporting, you would come away with an impression of Jackson as a nondescript general in the Confederate Army.
  • His creation, management and funding of a Sunday School for slaves in Lexington in 1855.  Jackson’s school apparently taught slaves to read — which was against the law in Virginia at that time. According to S.C. Gwynne’s biography of Jackson, “state law in Virginia prohibited whites from teaching blacks to read and write.”  Gwynne said that Jackson’s school irritated some local whites, because “of the Old South notion that educated blacks were potentially dangerous.” How many of us, nowadays, would risk angering our neighbors, or breaking the law to do the right thing? Stonewall Jackson did.

It is inexplicable that this information about Stonewall Jackson wasn’t covered in the Post’s reporting. Mr. Shapira is a Princeton graduate. It beggars belief that he, and his editors, didn’t know these basic things about Jackson and his legacy. Any credible biography of Jackson, like S.C. Gwynne’s Rebel Yell, would tell them. Is it possible the Post felt that, while the Virginia community reevaluated and reckoned with the legacy of Jackson over these past few tumultuous months, this information about him was irrelevant? That it had no place in the ongoing public discussion?

If the Washington Post was trying to inform its readership of all major aspects of Stonewall Jackson’s legacy so readers could make a reasoned, well-grounded determination of what that legacy should be — then these omissions make no sense.

If, however, the Post was trying to shape its readers’ impressions, and lead them to favor the side that wanted to see Jackson’s statue removed and all other signs of his legacy downgraded (or completely erased) at VMI, then the omissions do make sense. Mentioning the good points about Stonewall Jackson may have been inconvenient, in that respect.

I e-mailed the Washington Post last week, and asked to communicate with Mr. Shapira about his reporting on Stonewall Jackson, in relation to VMI.  The Post’s reply: “We do not have anything to share beyond what we’ve reported.” So, seeing that the Post has nothing more to say, it’s time to draw our own conclusions, based on the evidence we do have.

In my opinion, this explanation makes the most sense: the Washington Post approached the story of the Stonewall Jackson statue and Jackson’s legacy at VMI with the mindset of an activist, instead of a reporter. It appears likely, if not probable, that the Post’s goal was to influence specific changes and actions at VMI instead of objectively chronicling everything it learned and laying all the information out for the readers to decide.

Reporting like this make our community relations worse, not better. It fosters misunderstandings and misperceptions. And misunderstandings and misperceptions between groups lead to animosity.

It wouldn’t surprise me if many Virginians and DC-area residents who aren’t thrilled with Confederate symbolism look at those of us who defend Stonewall Jackson’s legacy and wonder what we’re thinking. They probably see Stonewall as just some Confederate general who was a bad teacher and owned slaves.  There’s a very good chance that those Virginians and D.C.-area residents know next to nothing about Jackson’s greatness as a general, his worldwide fame and his Sunday School for slaves. If they relied on the Post’s coverage, they probably wouldn’t know.

Those of us who defend Jackson’s legacy, on the other hand, look at Stonewall’s critics and wonder how they could ignore his greatness as a general and his Sunday School for slaves. To us, their reasoning can appear shallow, even petty. But, it’s possible that Jackson’s critics don’t know the full story of his legacy.  They most likely didn’t learn it in school, and the Washington Post’s coverage of the VMI controversy overlooked it — or deliberately chose not to print it.

It’s hard to take the Washington Post seriously now, as an objective, fair reporter on events in D.C .and Virginia. The folks at the Post must have known what they were doing. They must have known that anyone with a basic level of knowledge of Civil War or Virginia history would see the one-sidedness of their reporting. They must have known that, for longtime Virginia residents, especially those of us with ancestors who fought with Jackson in the Valley Army, that Stonewall’s legacy and theirs are intertwined. They certainly knew that many of us would think less of them for their slanted coverage of him. And yet, they did it anyway.

Congressman Dan Crenshaw, in a recent podcast with Jonah Goldberg, remarked that many of his colleagues seem more motivated to foster controversy and stir up passions, than to solve problems. It’s great for fundraising and media exposure, Crenshaw explained. Perhaps the Washington Post is thinking the same thing.

If so, it’s not only unfortunate, it’s poor citizenship on their part. Does the Washington Post want a Virginia united under a common, agreed-upon and respectful understanding of our shared past. Or does it want clicks and awards?

In an episode of M*A*S*H, Trapper John asked Henry Blake for a favor. Trapper told Henry that, if he refused, he and Hawkeye would tell everyone in camp that his brother was in jail  “My brother is a warden!” protested Henry. “We won’t say that part,” said Hawkeye.

Perhaps the Washington Post took its cue from Trapper and Hawkeye in its coverage of Stonewall Jackson’s legacy at VMI. It printed what it wanted to print. And, as for the other historical information, information that might cast a more favorable light on the general, it chose not to say those parts. If that’s what happened here, then that’s not journalism; that’s activism. That’s not reporting; that’s manipulation.

Donald Smith is a graduate of the University of Virginia who closely follows events at VMI.


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Comments

99 responses to “Why the Need to Slant Stonewall Jackson’s Legacy?”

  1. James Kiser Avatar
    James Kiser

    Interesting points. The main thing to remember is that advocates of the destruction of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights have to paint everything in America’s past as evil. This evil must then be used to punish those who had no part in any wrong doing. I had two GG grandfathers who fought in Southern armies and 1 who fought for the North. What they did or didn’t do is not a reflection on me.

    1. Nancy Naive Avatar
      Nancy Naive

      Which advocates? Those you saw on Jan 6, or those in 1861 who took up arms against the US?

      1. I think he’s talking about those who caused $2B of damage with rioting, arson, looting, and the killing of 40 people last summer and continuing in the NW these days.

        1. Nancy Naive Avatar
          Nancy Naive

          Hmm, not bad! Only $2B? Jan6 is at $500M for one — count it — one 8 hour day.

          1. And only one person murdered by police — a still unknown officer.

  2. LarrytheG Avatar
    LarrytheG

    Interesting article:

    Myths & Misunderstandings | Stonewall Jackson’s Sunday School

    https://acwm.org/blog/myths-misunderstandings-stonewall-jacksons-sunday-school/

    1. tmtfairfax Avatar
      tmtfairfax

      I don’t think that operating a Sunday School for African Americans undoes the evils of slavery. But it is a material fact. A real journalist would include all the facts to let readers draw their own conclusions. But then Shapira works for the Post. ‘Nuff said.

      1. Donald Smith Avatar
        Donald Smith

        Agreed. Plus, as I said in the article, by creating the school, Jackson risked his community’s disapproval, legal penalties, and (I didn’t say this in the piece) physical assault by whites who surely remembered Nat Turner’s massacre of whites 20 years earlier—-a massacre that prompted Virginia to enact the laws that Jackson violated with his Sunday School. I’m sure many of Jackson’s neighbors feared he might be putting them in danger of a new slave rebellion. That put Jackson at physical risk, of at least some rocks through his window. Yet he persisted. That deserves our respect. Ok

    2. Publius Avatar
      Publius

      Ah…so an article by Chris Graham is exclusively correct?
      Larry with his usual misdirection play.
      Here is an article about a stained glass window honoring Jackson at a predominately black church in Roanoke. The window was instigated by a descendant of slaves who appreciated what Jackson did, but why should we respect their opinions? We need the white saviors like Chris Graham to tell us what to think, amirite?

      https://roanoke.com/news/casey-the-stonewall-jackson-tribute-at-a-black-church-in-roanoke/article_eb264149-0eaf-5dd4-a5ad-2236dc999371.html

      Interestingly, the quote was Jackson’s dying declaration – that whole scene an interesting story in itself.

      1. LarrytheG Avatar
        LarrytheG

        Here is the problem. The reason Jackson is not revered by everyone is the adulation of him by those who subscribe to the “Lost Cause”.

        Today, we have folks who write about “history” and important players but will not acknowledge the issue of the Lost Cause – which is the primary reason why people want his statue removed despite his other accomplishments in his life.

        It’s the same issue with Lee and with many in the Confederacy who were elevated to hero status by the adherents of the Lost Cause.

        Now – the point here is about acknowledging the issue – as opposed to ignoring it all together and arguing that he was a “good man”.

        For those who see Jim Crow and the adulation of the Lost Cause as systemic racism – any symbols or memorials associated with it are unacceptable.

        Folks can and do argue about this, but shouldn’t it be at least acknowledged when arguing it? And if you do not acknowledge it, pretend it’s not part of the issue, who is your audience and what is your purpose?

        1. Publius Avatar
          Publius

          No Larry. The point is people are imperfect and always have been and the hubris of the people who presume to judge today. One day, abortion will be seen as abhorrent. So we wipe out all people who supported it? I mean they are killers!
          Sorry. I ain’t buying anything you are selling, and you can try and try, but it won’t work.
          I want to contextualize Ian Shapira and the Washington Compost and Bezos and African tribes which either killed or subjected to slavery or sold into slavery fellow blacks. In fact, purely as a medical fact, any slave descendant today should kiss the ground – he would not exist but for his ancestors and he exists in the greatest country in the world. It was the evil Christians who fought for the abolition of slavery. Meanwhile, your brain dead President is permitting slavery down at the border. Human trafficking is going on. OK for your team?
          Here’s a bonus question for Team (False) Compassion (really Team Empty Virtue Signaling) – what was the maximum number of kids in cages under Trump and the maximum number under SlowJoe?
          And while I’m at it, if Black Lives (Really) Matter(ed) to you Leftists, where is the daily outcry of black on black violence? Yeah, it only matters when it fits your narrative…

          1. Publius Avatar
            Publius

            Wow! It’s hot. Had to take a break from the yard work, and I realized the bonus question was never answered!
            Max “kids in cages” Trump – 2600
            Max “kids in cages” SlowJoe – 18000
            Therefore, SlowJoe is 7X more evil than the Bad Orange Man!

          2. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            No. We’re not talking about “imperfect” people. We’re talking about leaders who advocated the continued enslavement of 4 million people. A traitor to his country that advocated slavery as an institution.

            “My team” is all those folks who abhor memorialization of the Lost Cause, segregation, massive resistance, and the continued modern-day adulation of Jim Crow.

            Your team defends it by saying all folks are not “perfect”?

          3. Publius Avatar
            Publius

            Snore….you think you are the Angel of Light…On second thought…maybe you are!
            OK, Larry, when are you going to denounce socialism, or are you a Nazi?

          4. Eric the half a troll Avatar
            Eric the half a troll

            Speaking of which, Hilter and Stalin had many military victories. They should be lauded for such by the press according to JAB. They should stop focusing on their murderous history. Just to be balanced and fair, y’know.

          5. Publius Avatar
            Publius

            Alright! I have Full Troll and Larry spouting stupidity. Full Troll brings us to the Overton Window.
            Stonewall Jackson = Hitler and Stalin.
            QED…can anything more be said after that display of brilliance?
            Guys – I am not going to engage in your struggle session. You need to submit to mine. Denounce socialism and Marxism. Or do you favor killing hundreds of millions? Since you haven’t denounced it, it is clear you do approve of it.
            QED.

          6. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            What in the world does Socialism have to do with Jim Crow and the Lost Cause?

            If you want to talk socialism – how about Public roads, Public Schools, Public Health , public airwaves, public right-of-ways for pipelines and transmission lines, etc? Eminent Domain – the taking of property from one for the benefit of others who did not own that property – right?

            At any rate, we KNOW how these narratives play out – happened right here with a “plea” to recognize the “good man” in Jackson while ignoring the fundamental issue with Jim Crow and the Lost Cause – and from that – we get to the ideological mess some love.

          7. Eric the half a troll Avatar
            Eric the half a troll

            Your the one who keeps invoking Marxism and Nazis. I am just following your lead, Doc. Is that southern sun addling your brain or something?

          8. Matt Adams Avatar
            Matt Adams

            “Your [sic] the one who keeps invoking Marxism and Nazis. I am just following your lead, Doc. Is that southern sun addling your brain or something?”

            Ask your boss what’s wrong with your statement.

          9. Actually both Genls Lee and Jackson are studied at West Point — should that cease?

          10. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            We study the Russians, Germans, British, French, etc, right? different things?

          11. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            Nope. I just try to look at ALL the history and I DO listen to black folks and how they feel about it – pretty simple if you are really interested in the truth.

          12. Publius Avatar
            Publius

            Oh, you have a black friend? How’s that feel to have it played back at you?
            The underlying thing you are doing (you and Full Troll) is to insist on one view and to denounce anyone who disagrees as a racist, a Lost Cause sympathizer, a supporter of slavery. The issues between black and white people aren’t black and white. They are quite complicated because human beings are complicated and so is human history. You do not have an exclusive claim to morality. So, I am not going to engage in your struggle sessions – the Western Civ Judeo Christian worldview is responsible for civilization and I will defend it to the end. What you people of the Left promote destroys society and civilization and social order. You are destroyers and false judges. So I ain’t playing your game. If you bother to Larry and Full Troll, you will probably find people in your ancestry who fall short of your great morals. Perhaps you should jail yourselves for their failures…

          13. Eric the half a troll Avatar
            Eric the half a troll

            Ahhhh… the old “it’s complicated” defense..,

          14. Donald Smith Avatar
            Donald Smith

            Life is complicated, Not everyone can deal with it. But good citizens must deal with it, responsibly. Our ancestors didn’t sacrifice so much, so that their descendants could endulge in shallow thinking and thin skins.

          15. Eric the half a troll Avatar
            Eric the half a troll

            Life is indeed complicated. Right and wrong… not so much.

          16. Publius Avatar
            Publius

            The only thing simple in life is the “logic” of Leftists. You and Lar emote over that. I’m going to do some important work in the yard and experience far greater intellectual stimulation, but thanks for trying.

          17. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            Well more than “A” black friend. I listen to the black community and how they feel about Jim Crow/Lost Cause memorials.

            We need to be “together” on these issues – doesn’t mean we have to agree on all – but to just totally exclude the feeling of the black community on this issue is guaranteed to continue to be a “race” issue,

            We’ve had it for a long time and the words here prove we still have not reconciled it.

          18. Publius Avatar
            Publius

            Gee Larry… that sounds racist. The monolithic black community…So if a black disagrees with you, he ain’t black!
            You know… Malcolm X, Che Guevara, Ted Kennedy, Grand Kleagle Dem Senator Byrd all offend me. They hurt my feelings. Let’s be sure to erase them. While we are at it, how about those Germans? Don’t you think erasing all traces of German Aryan thinking by eliminating their descendants would be a good way to ensure never again?

          19. dick dyas Avatar
            dick dyas

            You have a point. Why keep a statue if it offends some of your neighbors? Irrespective of how paranoid they may ( or may not) be.
            Just remove it as a good neighbor. Don’t go all Mother Theresa about the century-old subject. Its over, Dude.

          20. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            If it offends an entire race and we know the origins of Jim Crow in putting them up?

            And I would not call black people “paranoid” about their treatment – they have good reasons to harbor their fears.

            So what is the motivation of those who insist those memorials stay up when they know how most blacks feel?

            Do they just reject how blacks feel?

          21. dick dyas Avatar
            dick dyas

            You are the paranoid one. Take a time out, Theresa

          22. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            Paranoid? about what?

          23. Matt Adams Avatar
            Matt Adams

            Given your current and past statements, it’s evident that you aren’t versed in any form of history.

          24. William O'Keefe Avatar
            William O’Keefe

            As usual you conclude things that were never said or implied. I can’t believe that you are that dense. So, what’s your agenda?

          25. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            You’re right. Tell me where I’m going wrong.

        2. Given “For those who see Jim Crow and the adulation of the Lost Cause as
          systemic racism – any symbols or memorials associated with it are
          unacceptable.
          “….should the Democratic Party be taken down?

          1. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            Sure, if the Dems of today were the same Dems of the past but the Dems proved they could change, no?

            So the GOP still wants the memorials left up right?

  3. Eric the half a troll Avatar
    Eric the half a troll

    You are right “owner of six slaves” does not paint the whole picture. He should have added “and traitor to his country” to be thorough.

    1. Actually according to the US Government Genl. Jackson and all those who wore grey were not traitors.

      1. Eric the half a troll Avatar
        Eric the half a troll

        Not true. They were simply pardoned – specifically for treason.

        1. Matt Adams Avatar
          Matt Adams

          No, they were granted amnesty in regards to it and all other offenses.

          Things you know if you actually read a history book instead of being a dumbf’ troll.

        2. Matt Adams Avatar
          Matt Adams

          No, they were granted amnesty in regards to it and all other offenses.

          Things you know if you actually read a history book instead of being a dumbf’ troll.

  4. William O'Keefe Avatar
    William O’Keefe

    Mr.Smith, this is a fine article. Neither the Post nor Shapira are interested in objectivity, context, or facts. They have an agenda and it’s to support historical revisionism. Understanding history is hard work and requires careful thinking and analysis. Those qualities are lacking in a lot of Post readers and those who only see the Civil War in terms of commitment to preserve slavery.

    1. Donald Smith Avatar
      Donald Smith

      Thanks. It’s sad to see a pillar of American journalism foster shallow thinking in its readership, and the community it serves.

      1. LarrytheG Avatar
        LarrytheG

        So here’s a question for you and Bill.

        Do you accept how MANY black people feel about these issues, or do you mostly reject their view?

        Don’t equivocate. Just give an honest answer.

        You already know mine.

        Here’s one poll:

        https://a.abcnews.com/images/US/Chart_UnequalTreatment_v02_DP_1595266119804_hpEmbed_17x12_608.jpg

        1. Publius Avatar
          Publius

          Larry – it’s just too much fun to show what a one trick pony you are…and a racist pony at that!
          So now we are on minority perceptions of the justice system. I know you libs love to say perception is reality…but reality is reality. So, these perceptions may be minorities’ perception, and it would be no surprise, given the incessant lying you Leftists do about it. In planting so much unnecessary fear, you have probably caused deaths…but you care!
          So here is an honest answer Larry – something Leftists never do. I can believe that is the perception. But I also just don’t believe a poll, particularly any one you cite. Meanwhile, there are millions of police interactions every day and we hear nothing about them. Only when a white officer shoots a black perp… And then played over and over…
          Now you be honest – do minority neighborhoods have more crime? Does the “black community” want police to protect them from the bad actors in their communities? Could absence of a father have anything to do with this? Any other factors?
          OK, now go get your stats on illegitimacy in Iceland and Europe and say “See? No it doesn’t.”
          Quit lying about the police. That would help perceptions quite a bit. Then get your union-loving Dem city bosses to actually weed out bad cops instead of having the union protect them.

          1. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            Publius -geeze louise guy… get a grip…

            REALLY simple issue – black folks don’t appreciate Jim Crow Lost Cause memorials – not a perception but a reality – and they are coming down because many folks both white and black agree they should – that’s a reality, not a perception and despite those who want to talk about “good men doing good works” – the reality is they were traitors to their country and they fought to continue to enslave 4 million human beings.

          2. Publius Avatar
            Publius

            No Larry – bait and switch squared. No one is supporting Jim Crow or Lost Cause and perception of the justice system has nothing to do with that. The only people supporting Jim Crow are the Neo-racists, who believe minorities lack human agency to make their own decisions and need to be “protected” by white savior, virtue signaling Libs, who actually care nothing for minorities in real life – just vote for us cuz we care (but go ahead and shoot each other, and we’ll defund the police to make your neighborhoods even more dangerous…cuz we care!)

        2. Donald Smith Avatar
          Donald Smith

          “Do you accept how MANY black people feel about these issues, or do you mostly reject their view?”

          Are you saying that journalists and historians should NOT report all the relevant facts of a matter, because it might…upset someone?

          I hope you’re not implying that the Washington Post did the right thing in sanitizing its reporting of Jackson’s legacy, because telling his full story would hurt too many Black people’s feelings. That would be a pretty patronizing attitude to hold of Black Americans.

          You appear to be throwing all sorts of issues up against the wall here, to see if any of them stick. I wrote about the WP’s treatment of Jackson’s legacy; you respond with a graph about the treatment of minorities in the criminal justice system. Stonewall Jackson wasn’t a lawyer, judge or legislator, so I’ll presume you’re just trying to blow smoke here. How’s that for “equivocation?”

          If you stray off the topic I’ve written about, you shouldn’t expect me to respond.

          1. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            No – I’m talking about , not the media at all, but black people themselves, descendants of slaves -how THEY FEEL about these issues.

            Some here seem to depict it as a matter of opinion between white and black folks as if Jim Crow was merely expressing their opinion.

  5. Should the WaPo advocate the closing of all mosques due that religion’s close and continuing ties to slavery and bigamy?

    1. LarrytheG Avatar
      LarrytheG

      No more than the Catholics, no?

      1. WayneS Avatar

        No.

  6. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
    James Wyatt Whitehead

    A true student of Jackson would know that Thomas Jonathan Jackson was a fanatical believer of the tenets of the Presbyterian Church. Jackson feared the wrath of God, not Yankees, not battle, and certainly not the weak jabs of revisionists such as Ian Shapiro.

    He fully believed in predestination. Jackson was convinced that only a limited “elect” get to heaven. And that was by the grace and mercy of God Almighty. Jackson believed that “works” could only do a small amount if at all to win the favor of God. He viewed himself as an Old Testament Christian warrior, not unlike dare I say John Brown.

    Jackson fanned and fostered a Third Great Awakening in the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. It is said that Jackson contributed to bringing 150,000 men to the Cross in his brief 2 year Confederate Army career.

    Stonewall would admonish most posters here at the Rebellion. He was perfectly content with whatever “Providence” had prescribed as his destiny. As a condemned sinner, Jackson would advise you all here to beg God for mercy, keep His Laws, obey the Sabbath, and stop worrying about his legacy. Jackson would hold you in contempt for anything less.

    1. LarrytheG Avatar
      LarrytheG

      and yet, he did fight to continue to enslave people.

      He was a Great man and I do mean that but he also was on the wrong side of something I’d have a hard time believing that GOD wanted. The abolitionists were also God-fearing and on the right side.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_abolitionism#:~:text=Although%20many%20Enlightenment%20philosophers%20opposed,and%20organized%20an%20abolitionist%20movement.

      We have to accept that as great as Jackson was, he was also flawed – as are we all. His place in history will not be changed or revised.

      History cannot be changed but how we choose to memorialize it in the public realm can and is.

      1. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
        James Wyatt Whitehead

        Yes Mr. Larry. A sinner. Just like you. Just like me. Are you no different as a Democrat and supporter of abortion in the Commonwealth of Virginia? The arguments that defend the enslaver and the abortionists seem one and the same to me. What will be said of us when we are weighed in the balance and found as wanting as Thomas Jonathan Jackson?

        1. Eric the half a troll Avatar
          Eric the half a troll

          I don’t think Larry had six abortions… just saying…

          1. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
            James Wyatt Whitehead

            No but the Commonwealth of Virginia presided over 18,000 abortions in 2018. And you and Mr. Larry cheered it on.

          2. Eric the half a troll Avatar
            Eric the half a troll

            Dishonest characterization on your part there. You can do better.

          3. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
            James Wyatt Whitehead

            I didn’t think they could stack buffalo chips as high as a half troll.

          4. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            I think you’ve been eating your Wheaties lately, eh?

          5. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            I think you’ve been eating your Wheaties lately, eh?

          6. Matt Adams Avatar
            Matt Adams

            “Eric the half a troll James Wyatt Whitehead • 14 hours ago
            Dishonest characterization on your part there. You can do better.”

            You should find a mirror when calling others dishonest.

          7. Eric the half a troll Avatar
            Eric the half a troll

            Good Monday morning to you, as well, Sunshine! Uneventful weekend, I take it..,

          8. Matt Adams Avatar
            Matt Adams

            You’re just a bang up for errors aren’t ya?

            Hope bossy doesn’t use you as a proofread.

          9. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            I did. when? Shame on you James, you’re better than that.

          10. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
            James Wyatt Whitehead

            Yes you did. When you voted for Northam and when you vote for McAuliffe in November.

          11. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            No more than you supported mass killings for gun rights… right?

            tighten it up dude! You’re better than this.

          12. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            I think you got into something tonight, no?

          13. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
            James Wyatt Whitehead

            Every time you and half troll come after the heroes of Virginia you can expect a digital black eye from me.

          14. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            Okay. IF you say so. You’ve got that right.

          15. WayneS Avatar

            “No more than you supported mass killings for gun rights… ”

            That is a bare-faced lie. Those who support our natural right to self-defense and the rights protected by the 2nd Amendment do not support mass killings and you know it.

            You should be ashamed of yourself.

          16. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            I did not say that. I responded to an assertion that those who voted Democratic supported abortion and I responded that it was no more true than those who supported gun rights also supported mass killings.

            BOth premises are wrong.

            now get a grip.

    2. Eric the half a troll Avatar
      Eric the half a troll

      “It is said that Jackson contributed to bringing 150,000 men to the Cross in his brief 2 year Confederate Army career.”

      I suspect he contributed to bringing quite a few more directly to God….

      1. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
        James Wyatt Whitehead

        Jackson saw every one of them as an enemy of God.
        “I want my army to be an army of the living God.”

  7. tmtfairfax Avatar
    tmtfairfax

    If the Post were interested in truth, it would dispatch a few reporters who did not cover Virginia politics to investigate and report on how it missed uncovering Northam’s racist blackface actions that occurred as an adult for not one, but two, election cycles. It would report on itself. But the Post as with many other major media companies have no interest in reporting the facts and letting them fall where they may.

    I think Larry’s point that, on a number of issues, many blacks may have opinions that differ from many whites. However, that, in and of itself, doesn’t mean either are necessarily right or that the other is necessarily wrong. A good and open society encourages discussion and debate among all people. It’s generally through this process that some level of consensus and movement are reached.

    1. LarrytheG Avatar
      LarrytheG

      blacks don’t simply have different opinions – they were the intended targets and the victims of decades of racial hate and violence.

      and when white folks say it’s just an “opinion” – well you can see how things go south.

      Jim Crow and the lost cause was NOT an “opinion”!

  8. Matt Hurt Avatar
    Matt Hurt

    I’m sure our ruling class really appreciate everyone investing all of this time and effort debating what happened 160 years ago so they can get by with all of their crap today. Convenient distractions.

    1. Donald Smith Avatar
      Donald Smith

      So, what should we be doing instead? Rioting?

      I’m not sure you read my piece closely enough. It’s about how a major American media organization covered an important local issue—how to handle the legacy of an American hero. It points out how, when the media stops being objective and instead takes sides on an issue, it hurts all of us. And it sets a terrible precedent.

      Hopefully, by peacefully but forcefully pointing that out, with words instead of rocks, the public will be inspired to put some pressure on the media, and the media will get its act in line.

      1. Matt Hurt Avatar
        Matt Hurt

        I did. However, our media is fueled by clicks. They pay close attention to their analytics, and whatever generates more traffic on their website, they go with. The facade of their objectivity (were they ever truly objective?) was razed by the Internet. As it turns out, this general narrative has brought them pretty good income.

        I think most thinking people are fairly skeptical of the grand narratives the media are pushing. The less we pay attention to their crap, the more likely they will either wither on the vine or get to more serious business.

        Rioting has been in progress for a few years now, and is likely to get worse.

        1. LarrytheG Avatar
          LarrytheG

          The media has pretty much always been biased and thus the good reason to keep one’s reading varied and focused on finding facts but the media blaming pales in comparison to the folks who now make no pretence at bias – they openly promote misinformation, disinformation, lies, conspiracy theories and people do believe them – AND act on them.

          To me that’s a much bigger threat to our way of life than mere bias.

          People believe stuff that is patently false these days – it’s not bias – it’s lies.

          It changes not only the way they vote, they become convinced that the vote itself was corrupted – not a fraudulent vote here or there but thousands of votes…entire elections.

          That’s a far, far bigger threat to the country than bias IMHO.

          1. WayneS Avatar

            “People believe stuff that is patently false these days – it’s not bias – it’s lies.”

            Things like gun rights activists supporting mass murder? Things like that?

          2. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            there’s a difference between “bias” and outright lies

            The media is clearly guilty of bias and has been for as long as they have been in existence.

            But how many times, for instance, has WaPo purposely and repeatedly published outright lies or promoted conspiracy theories like some other media does?

            Yet WaPo gets called out by the same people who never call out the other media that promotes outright lies.

            no?

          3. WayneS Avatar

            Correct, and you told an outright lie in your earlier post.

          4. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            sez you? 😉 go sit down.

          5. WayneS Avatar

            11-111
            00-010
            01-011
            10-110
            10-101
            00-010

      2. Guy Wilson Avatar
        Guy Wilson

        BTW, Jackson was considered a “friend of the Black community” in Lexington. Seems his second wife, daughter if the President if Davidson College, brought her 3 slaves to his home. Jackson was apparently asked to buy two slaves out of compassion for them, which he did. The sixth was apparently a special needs child whom his wife asked him to take in, and she was that child’s caretaker. His SS Class it only was illegal but it showed her regarded these people as souls precious to God and for whom Christ died. It is true that he accepted the status quo as ordained by God, who would change it in due time, and that his work was to look to their eternal souls. It was also this belief that made him fearless in battle, believing that his death would come when God willed it. Few people kñow that Jackson never resigned his post at VMI, and was carried on the Faculty until his death. There is every reason to believe his one motivation was to defend his state, home and hearth…and VMI.

  9. Alex Church Avatar
    Alex Church

    Hey, Ian, Stonewall Jackson may have owned people and treasonously commanded an army fighting on behalf of a slaveholder’s rebellion that turned their back on the American Experiment, but you missed the real Jackson, who was….uh…a skilled military leader and uh……taught slaves to read?

    1. Donald Smith Avatar
      Donald Smith

      Judging people in the past by today’s standards is…uh…probably unfair…but it DOES make us feel good about ourselves…and in the end, that’s what REALLY counts!

      1. Guy Wilson Avatar
        Guy Wilson

        Donald, I am a Son of the South and a Republican who reveres Lincoln and Douglass. I have despised Democrats who have seen and now see everything through the lens of race. I spent more than a decade volunteering at Historically Black Colleges, and was mentored by a great civil rights leader. I can make a pretty good argument from the perspective of either side in the Civil War/WBTS. Such arguments also must include the wrongs and hypocrisy on each side. While few in the Gray fought for the 5% of Southerners invested in slaves, it is yet true that the South could not prevail carrying the moral burden of slavery. And yet, the 5% of African slaves who came to our shores, as opposed to lands south of us…or worse, the Muslim lands to the East, undoubtedly were ultimately the most fortunate of all. And they should be amazed that more than 600k young men died, largely over the issue of their freedom. I am slow to judge the large sweep of history and the Sovereign’s mysterious ways, when I ponder that His plan for his chosen people included slavery in Egypt for 400 years and 70 years of captivity in Babylon…and eventually, the Holocaust. I fear the period since the passage of Civil Rights legislation, this wallowing in grievance and blame, is for many yet a wandering in the wilderness. As Shelby Steele has said, “A dream deferred.”… and…”today we (blacks) do not have a problem with oppression, we have a problem with freedom.” Your Democrat commenters think the mention of socialism is unrelated to this discussion. It is not. An early Marxist pioneer stated, “Socialism is the most perfect form of slavery”…under the virtual lash of a supremacist elite. It’s the opposite of freedom, and is the leftist’s false dream for the “masses”. In conclusion, almost all arguments we see here are mostly inadequate simplifications of the most complex period of our history. We must study it, not cancel it. With Lincoln, I am not at all unsure that God’s providence was played out, from the abolitiinists in the North, all the way to Jackson’s evangelism in the South.

  10. Greg Long Avatar
    Greg Long

    The following Video is a long 45 minute “watch”, but it is amazing in the detail of the research and interviews. It highlights the issues in the article above with WaPo reporting but equally questions what the VMI BOV and administration is so afraid of that they would not raise this. Perhaps the compromise would have been to REPLACE “soldier” Jackson’s statue with “Teacher and leader Jackson’s statue to put everything in perspective… The only seemingly logical explanation is FEAR and lack of moral courage in Lexington and Richmond.. and blinders by the WaPo…

    https://www.c-span.org/video/?195921-1/stonewall-jackson-black-mans-friend

    1. LarrytheG Avatar
      LarrytheG

      re: ” Perhaps the compromise would have been to REPLACE “soldier” Jackson’s statue with “Teacher and leader Jackson’s statue to put everything in perspective… ”

      A step away from the Jim Crow lost cause idolatry, yes, but would he deserve a memorial to his “teacher and leader” role more than other teacher and leaders?

      And that does not mean – the memorial stays up because we’ve changed what it represents but at least that sentiment recognizes a central issue which is who memorialized him in the first place and for what role?

      Let me ask a question. What if Sacajawea actually did have a memorial and was depicted on a horse with a weapon and subordinate men following on the ground.

      Would that be an honest memorial? Even if some people saw her in that light and commissioned a memorial showing that role – would it ring true to others or conform to actual history?

      I’m not saying the Jackson memorial was dishonest per se but did it depict a role that was idolized by some but abhorred and reviled by others – descendants of those Jackson fought to keep enslaved.

      It would seem that under those conditions, such a memorial was never going to be accepted by some as legitimate.

      1. Donald Smith Avatar
        Donald Smith

        Larry, I’m relatively new to Bacons’s Rebellion, so, forgive me if someone has asked you this question before: Are you the Media Matters duty troll assigned to this site?

        1. LarrytheG Avatar
          LarrytheG

          Donald, you seem to be well-intentioned but yet another seriously misguided when it comes to really understanding the memorial issue.

          It’s as much about Jim Crow idolatry as it is about the person memorialized.

          but that apparently must sails right over the head, eh?

        2. LarrytheG Avatar
          LarrytheG

          Why no Donald. Why do you ask? Are you striving to become yet another dumbass in BR?

  11. William Cover Avatar
    William Cover

    There should be more scrutiny of the history of the rebel song “Stonewall Jackson’s Way”. It has been rumored that Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes declared this song to be the best to come out of the rebel side during one of his lectures on “Songs of the War”. (June 8, 1870 Alexander Gazzette). Shall we delete all his Supreme Court Rulings?

  12. Michael Novak Avatar
    Michael Novak

    You were doing great until you brought in Dan Crenshaw. That made this not sharable and talk about advocating for a political viewpoint. Crenshaw supports sedition. I was going to reinforce your message until that.

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