Another Race Institute at UVa

Kimberly J. Robinson, UVa Professor of Law. Official Photo

by James C. Sherlock

Fund it and they will come.

The Daily Progress reports that thanks to a $4.9 million gift from an anonymous philanthropist, a new “Institute” has been launched at UVa’s School of Law.

The new organization, the Education Rights Institute, plans to

“find ways to improve K-12 education and help educators address the obstacles that face disadvantaged students.”

Staff have been hired and the institute’s first projects are already in development. There will be a star-studded roll out on October 16th.

Excited?

Hold that thought while you read about the Institute’s leadership, goals and intentions.

Intentions.  The new Institute plans, according to its Director, Law Professor Kimberly J. Robinson, to:

“Produce a video newsletter where we will take research findings and make them into short videos so that they’re easily digestible by the public, and then we’ll pair that with reports that synthesize research about issues related to a high-quality education, Title VI and issues related to a federal right to education.”

Translation: They are going to make cartoon versions of issues in education based upon “synthesized research.” Presumably from UVa’s School of Education, which hosts a half dozen “Centers and Labs” on those subjects and in which Ms. Robinson is also a Professor.

I should mention that the very busy Professor Robinson is also the director of the Center for the Study of Race and Law at the law school.

That should strip away any illusions created by the rhetoric (see second goal below) about where the new Institute will focus its efforts.

Let’s see how they plan to ensure the philanthropist is going to get his or her money’s worth.

Three goals

“‘The first goal is to elevate scholarship about a federal right to education and the absence of any guarantee in the United States for high-quality education that enables students to be college- and career-ready and engaged citizens,’ Robinson said.

Translation: Emulate at the federal level the guarantee in Article 8 Section 1 of Virginia’s constitution. Look how well that has worked in this state in the decades it has been in place. We won’t hold our collective breaths until the new “scholarship” will “elevate” that example.

“The second goal is to recognize the elements of a high-quality education, research opportunity gaps “based on race, class and ZIP code” and identify federal resources available to help achieve a high-quality education.”

Translations:

    • “Recognize the elements of a high quality education.”  The project hired two recent graduates of UVa’s ed school to do that. Perhaps Success Academy methodology will make the cut. Probably not. The researchers would risk career suicide.
    • “Research opportunity gaps based on race, class and zip code.” Pretty sure that subject is already exhaustively researched and published. But perhaps those two freshly minted ed school grads can take it to a new level. Maybe they will buck the ed school/public education unions system? Nah. See career suicide above.
    • “Identify federal resources” means join the cacophony of lobbyists to send more money into the bottomless pit which is much of U.S. American urban education led by radicals, grifters and incompetents.

The third goal is to help school districts understand their obligations under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VI prohibits discrimination on the grounds of race, color or national origin of recipients of federal financial assistance.”

Translation: Sue. This is a law school project after all. They finally got to the bottom line.

Of interest to all of us is what, exactly, the lawsuits will seek as redress from the courts to help students. Some options:

  • Objective, not subjective, performance standards for schools.
  • Federal or state takeover of individual school divisions that routinely do not meet those objectives.
  • Elimination of DEI staff to free up speech, innovation, time and money for actual education.
  • Elimination of gender, race and SEL courses in favor of academics.
  • Strict attendance enforcement.
  • Establishment of discipline and order in the schools.
  • Charter schools.
  • Vouchers.
  • Year-round school after cleanup of the mess.

Sorry, lost my head.

Perhaps they will recommend the federal Department of Education establish a Civil Rights Division. Oh, that’s right, there is one.

A leftist galaxy of stars at the roll out.  

Welcoming Remarks

  • Risa Goluboff, Dean, Arnold H. Leon Professor of Law and Professor of History, University of Virginia School of Law
  • James E. Ryan ’92, President, University of Virginia
  • Kimberly Jenkins Robinson, Inaugural Director, Education Rights Institute; Martha Lubin Karsh and Bruce A. Karsh Bicentennial Professor of Law

Keynote Address – Na’ilah Suad Nasir, President, Spencer Foundation

Ms. Nasir served as Vice-Chancellor of Equity and Inclusion at the University of California, Berkeley. Her keynote should be riveting.

Q&A moderated by Kimberly Jenkins Robinson

“Moderated” is an interesting word with UVa’s DEI world assembled.

Bottom line: I have spent much of the last 18 years of my life examining K-12 education in Virginia and advocating relentlessly and publicly for improving the educations of poor minority kids.

I have focused on demonstrated successes in achieving that goal. I have found some charter management organizations that produce superb results with the exact populations that the educational and legal left purport to champion.

Yet those same people have with considerable success actively ignored those results and instead engaged in relentless pursuit of an oppressor/victim narrative and the positing of minority children as unteachable in math, reading, science, history and civics using traditional pedagogy.

They have even actively opposed the maintenance of safe and orderly school teaching environments and the enforcement of attendance laws as somehow racially biased.

In other words, they challenge the standards of schooling, not just the methods. They therefore naturally oppose accountability under existing standards.

Fine, do it.

But present examples of widespread and sustainable success in the implementation of your ideas. They have not, and do not intend to do so. It is the narrative, not results, that they are selling.

The donor is perfectly entitled to pay for this nonsense. But his money has assembled academics with no track records of success in actually improving K-12 education. Indeed, the ideas they support have destroyed educational opportunity for a generation.

They remain heedless of the costs of their failures. We should not.


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Comments

98 responses to “Another Race Institute at UVa”

  1. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
    James Wyatt Whitehead

    Glad the new program is not housed in the Athletic Department. The Wahoos are 0-5 in football. Sorry Hoos, beating William and Mary doesn’t count. That was a scrimmage or tea party.

    1. LesGabriel Avatar
      LesGabriel

      I heard William was sick the week they beat William and Mary

      1. Not Today Avatar

        Are you sure Mary wasn’t incapacitated by childbirth? It is a rumor after all.

  2. Not Today Avatar

    I am always happy to see successful women doing their thing. You’re not? Race is at the center of many disproportionate outcomes and advancing data-driven approaches to dismantling its impact is not only important but VITAL to the ongoing success of our national experiment with representative governance.

    1. James C. Sherlock Avatar
      James C. Sherlock

      Why is race not at the center of the brilliant outcomes achieved by poor urban minority kids at Success Academy in New York City?

      1. Because all needs must be provided entirely by the government, preferably the federal government.

        “The first goal is to elevate scholarship about a federal right to education …”

      2. Because all needs must be provided entirely by the government, preferably the federal government.

        “The first goal is to elevate scholarship about a federal right to education …”

        1. LarrytheG Avatar

          the interesting thing about the Success Academies is how long they have been in operation AND how many other states have adopted that approach.

          Has it spread?

        2. Not Today Avatar

          Heaven forbid a nation guarantee it’s children a right to LEARN…awful idea, that.

      3. Not Today Avatar

        What makes you think it’s not at the center? What makes you think actively celebrating the achievements of their ancestors and relatives ISN’T at the core of how they motivate students and achieve success?

  3. walter smith Avatar
    walter smith

    One must understand – EVERYTHING at UVA is Marxist oriented. This is just more of the same, except JCS missed one thing. The disadvantaged will include transsexuals, so expect lots of litigation over that.

    While j6ers rot in jail, denied due process, speedy trial, bail, etc. UVA law cared more about Muslims at Guantanamo.

    Check out UVIMCO, and its “Responsibility” tab. Then check out the 3 “advisors” they use to advise the virtue-signaling advisory board. Not environmental whackos (not!)
    Not ESG/CRT activists (not)
    Miyares should get UVIMCO back to fiduciary duty as opposed to political investing.

  4. f/k/a_tmtfairfax Avatar
    f/k/a_tmtfairfax

    I bet a federal right to a quality education is still hidden in a penumbra or emanation, just waiting to be discovered.

    Once the private money is accepted by UVA, doesn’t it become public money? Can public money be spent to discriminate on the basis of race or any other suspect classification? Or in violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

    1. Dick Hall-Sizemore Avatar
      Dick Hall-Sizemore

      I, too, was was wondering about that “federal right to education.”

      1. Nancy Naive Avatar
        Nancy Naive

        … promote the general welfare…

  5. Teddy007 Avatar

    This seems to have been written by someone who does not understand how institutions of higher education function. That someone is bring in outside money is the way that tenured is achieved.

  6. Dick Hall-Sizemore Avatar
    Dick Hall-Sizemore

    The goal of this new center or institute is a worthy one. We know that economically disadvantaged students face challenges. The test scores tell us that. There is a general consensus as to the causes of those challenges. What remains is finding ways to help them meet those challenges and overcome their disadvantage. Two questions:

    1. Why is this center being placed in the School of Law, rather than the School of Education?
    2. A more fundamental question is: Why isn’t the UVa. School of Education already doing this?

    1. James C. Sherlock Avatar
      James C. Sherlock

      I think I answered both those two questions and the “what remains” comment in the article, Dick

      1. Dick Hall-Sizemore Avatar
        Dick Hall-Sizemore

        These were sort of rhetorical questions.

        1. Nancy Naive Avatar
          Nancy Naive

          Hmmm, rhetorical, eh? Methinks mockery.

    2. Not Today Avatar

      CRT (that demonized thing) is a creature of legal study/research, not education research. Education research has focused largely on students/families and health/academic outcomes, not on the laws and policies that created disparate academic, health, and wealth outcomes to begin with. Lawyers are also, typically, granted more academic freedom. IOW – free er to discuss reality and data apart from ideologues.

      1. Nancy Naive Avatar
        Nancy Naive

        Aside from the description of CRT by the ABA, I read only one paper on CRT available online. Okay, okay, 1/2 of one paper before rolling my eyes up and sleeping.

        What I was able to glean, CRT is an attempt to develop an analytical tool to determine how a rule, and combinations of rules, partitions the population into affected subsets, presumably to observe biases created by the rules. For example, an abortion ban clearly partitions the population by child-bearing ability (the ban has no effect on men). Now, if there is a law on allowing denial of coverage because of preexisting medical conditions, voila! In combination, the two rules have a bias to pregnant women, possibly unintended but there. (my example, there were none in the paper)

        Of course, the more ignorant than I immediately believed it was pervasive and had something to do with Marxism.

        1. Not Today Avatar

          Yes. It is about how laws and regulations, ostensibly neutral things in this day and age, have evolved over time to include embedded discrimination/disparate beliefs at their core, and often work to CREATE new and PERPETUATE old DISPARITIES. It’s, in short, complicated, and not easily reduced to talking points.

          Choosing immigrant speakers and black women leaders as PERPETUAL targets of scorn is a prime example of how we embed white, male hegemony in everyday life. Sherlock has never met this woman, spoken to her, discussed his questions or concerns with her. He is projecting his own presumptuous biases on her work. Changing that reflex is HARD. It’s far easier to demonize from afar based on FEAR. FEAR of being supplanted as the author of the American story by CO-authors.

          One white man’s take on their work and aims is seemingly more valuable and valued than all the scholars (who bring their own nuanced takes to bear) who intend to attend/discuss THE DATA.

          Even more so, to extend your example, abortion bans partition women of childbearing age from other women who CANNOT bear children, regardless of age (due to age, infertility, or desire). It’s divide and conquer in action. Non-childbearing women who WANT kids should have no more say over the body of a potentially fertile woman than do men yet we prioritize their preferences over the health implications for those they seek to restrict.

          1. Nancy Naive Avatar
            Nancy Naive

            Sounds like a job for AI… if you can keep the training sets and material unbiased. 😉

          2. Not Today Avatar

            AI itself is biased by all of the (already biased) content it has been fed. That is a growing field of concern/study.

          3. Nancy Naive Avatar
            Nancy Naive

            Yes, it is. Going to be a big challenge. We, including AI, are shaped by our experiences, real or perceived.

          4. James C. Sherlock Avatar
            James C. Sherlock

            “Sherlock has never met this woman, spoken to her, discussed his questions or concerns with her.”

            Good job. Set a standard that is broadly unachievable and then charge someone with whom you disagree of failing to clear the bar.

            If we cannot critique public figures from their writings and actions, then there will be virtually no reporting. But you know that. Reporting interrupts the narrative.

            Professor Robinson has been nothing if not crystal clear on her preferred courses of action.

            The thrust of my article is that the radical left sells narratives, not outcomes that improve people’s lives.

            So I publicly disagree with Ms. Robinson’s extremely well documented policy choices.

            In doing so I offered policy choices that are proven to help the kids whose interests this Institute professes to support.

            I challenge her to produce results equal to those already demonstrated to work, not just a narrative.

            First amendment stuff.

          5. Not Today Avatar

            First off, she’s not a public figure seeking the limelight or a person of fame or notoriety but I see you trying to make her one. She is a public employee; there is a significant difference you should be aware of.

            Second, you are, of course, welcome to critique her work. What work are you critiquing? The center is new. What work has it done such that you can provide a critique of her leadership or its impact on schools? Tying her to your so-called ‘radical left’ is purely imaginative/creative on your part, not based in any actual thing she’s done. I give you credit for acknowledging that with the ‘galaxies’ and ‘lost head’ bits.

            Third, what do you object to in advising districts about their obligations under federal civil rights law? Title VI, by the by, also includes national origin, disability, language access/interpreters, and more. Yes, the mechanism by which civil rights laws are enforced is lawsuits. You don’t wanna get sued? Follow the law.

            You stood up a whole bunch of straw men in response to uncontroversial goals and proceeded to go at them with a machete as if they were fighting you back. It’s a weird flex.

          6. LarrytheG Avatar

            The “radical left” was a “tell”.

          7. Not Today Avatar

            It’s more than that. Rather than go to the person with whom you believe yourself to be in disagreement and seek clarification or justification, he launched a screed wherein he ‘translates’ the literal words on a website into gobbledygook of his own making and then sought to turn a private researcher, a public employee, into a ‘public figure’ which has a specific meaning under the law (someone entitled to a lesser level of protection against defamation). It’s blatant and foolish. Ask former POTUS how that worked out when tried with GA poll workers.

          8. Not Today Avatar

            It’s more than that. Rather than go to the person with whom you believe yourself to be in disagreement and seek clarification or justification, he launched a screed wherein he ‘translates’ the literal words on a website into gobbledygook of his own making and then sought to turn a private researcher, a public employee, into a ‘public figure’ which has a specific meaning under the law (someone entitled to a lesser level of protection against defamation). How in the heck do you issue a challenge to someone who doesn’t even know you exist?! It’s blatant and foolish demagoguery. Ask former POTUS and disgraced attorney Giuliani how that worked out when tried with GA poll workers. If Sherlock wants to play fast and loose with journalism/first amendment law against attorneys, he’d be wise to make sure he’s on the right side of the law. Is he? Is this site?

          9. Not Today Avatar

            By the way, there is NOTHING unachievable about making a phone call, sending an email, or setting an appt to meet over Zoom. You are a man with tremendously creative thoughts and ideas. Those are pedestrian means of making contact. People of good will use them all the time. Are you one such person? I challenge you to produce an actual conversation with private people before attempting to rake them over the coals by critiquing A MEETING AGENDA (or for the military types, PLAN OF THE DAY).

          10. Not Today Avatar

            By the way, there is NOTHING unachievable about making a phone call, sending an email, or setting an appt to meet over Zoom. You are a man with tremendously creative thoughts and ideas. Those are pedestrian means of making contact. People of good will use them all the time. Are you one such person? I challenge you to produce an actual conversation with private people in which you identify yourself as a journalist before attempting to rake them over the coals by critiquing A MEETING AGENDA (or for the military types, PLAN OF THE DAY).

          11. Eric the half a troll Avatar
            Eric the half a troll

            “Good job. Set a standard that is broadly unachievable and then charge someone with whom you disagree of failing to clear the bar.”

            Your email and phone are broken? Journalists routinely report that “so and so has been reached for comment…”

        2. This might add to your understanding.

          https://criticalrace.org/what-is-critical-race-theory/

        3. This might add to your understanding.

          https://criticalrace.org/what-is-critical-race-theory/

          1. If you go to his site and read it, he has been very open and specific about his complaints. But, I’m not sure how the character assassination of the site you linked rebuts the facts about CRT of the one I linked.

          2. LarrytheG Avatar

            I think you had recounted a personal experience of a dad/grandad having built wealth with a job that had benefits.

            Do you think that opportunity was available to black grandads?

            Does CRT allude to things like that?

          3. I not only think it, I know it. I worked with many of them, mentored and trained them. All great people. Almost all of them blame the wage gap on the failure of so many blacks to finish school and the failure of the black community to embrace education as a way of advancing. They say they feel that there are 2 black Americas – the very liberal inner city that fails and the more traditional black family that succeeds. Get an education, work hard, stay off drugs and no kids until married doesn’t guarantee success, but it is a prerequisite.
            NO, having a job with benefits is no guarantee of success or wealth creation. I have a relative who makes low 6 figures in IT. Lives paycheck to paycheck, has no retirement savings, or any other savings, etc. He also has no self control. Buys everything he sees, measures his self worth by what he owns, etc. Wealth creating takes discipline. I worked blue collar with no benefits for years. I managed to control my spending, save money and pay for insurance. I deeply resent those who tell me that people who wasted their financial life have a claim on my savings simply because they are broke. They were broke when they should have been rich – it’s their fault. It would be a nicer world if people who want to help the poor also told the poor how to help themselves and held them accountable for their bad decisions. But you all can’t tell me what the fair share for the rich is and how you computed it, so I don’t see any hope that you’ll tell the poor what they have to do to get benefits.

          4. LarrytheG Avatar

            You think black grandads had the same education opportunities?

            a job with benefits is no guarantee for sure but NOT having a job with benefits is not the SAME, right?

            I don’t know your age but are you aware of how Jim Crow worked in terms of education and job opportunities , owning land, etc?

            I can tell you what I think “fair share” , no problem. Tell me that we have a system where
            the more wealthy don’t have to pay what everyone else pays in sales or real estate tax. Now tell me it works that way with income tax.

          5. Blacks were able in the Jim Crow era to become wealthy and have vibrant societies. Most of the race riots were because blacks were doing better than whites. Asians were also discriminated against. They overcame. Today, immigrant blacks do better than native born blacks in America – why? They didn’t get a leg up from their ancestors. Hispanics who immigrate do better. Even if you were correct, you can’t change the past. If you want to change the outcome for blacks, give them the skills to succeed, not, as you are doing, the excuses for failure.

            Here’s Deiom Sanders on the issue:

            https://x.com/CitizenFreePres/status/1712263504839733556?s=20

            You can’t give them enough welfare to make them wealthy. You can’t give them self respect. But you can give them the tools and hold them accountable and they will earn the wealth and self respect. As Deion says – invest in yourself.

            Finally, according to IRS data, the top 5% earn 20% of the income in US, but pay 40% of the taxes. That seems to be 2x what you say they should pay. Send them a refund. The system you claim doesn’t exist, does.

          6. LarrytheG Avatar

            “Blacks were able in the Jim Crow era to become wealthy and have vibrant societies.”

            A few might have been able to overcome jim Crow – the vast majority did not. How could they
            if they received inferior educations, would not be hired by many businesses, was almost impossible to own land. The white folks were rioting against the black folks for how well they were doing?

            Immigrant blacks do better because they were not damaged for generations by Jim Crow laws.
            Most black and asian immigrants to the US are already wealthy in their own countries, by the way. They get here on Visas based on their wealth and education and perceived ability to benefit the US.

            You’re in willful denial here about simple facts and clear history IMO. Jim Crow was no benefit at all to all blacks and is the primary reason why most of them did not build wealth like white folks did and that disparity persists to this day if you look at how much wealth white folks have accumulated on average vs blacks. You even say what whites attacked blacks over envy for what little some did gain!

            The tax code is progressive on purpose. People and businesses that pay no income tax at all or pay income tax at rates far below folks with lower income are not paying their fair share IMO.

            Investment income earned by the wealthier is taxed at a lower rate than wage income.

            Stepped-up capital gains does not tax the gains when the money is inherited – again a benefit
            to folks wealthier than others.

          7. LarrytheG Avatar

            Tom, have you heard of Massive Resistance and separate but equal?

          8. Who pays for the welfare and other benefits? It isn’t the poor who pay for them.

            Separate but equal and massive resistance are still platforms of the democrat party.

          9. Not Today Avatar

            Seeing as how white people are the majority of ‘welfare’ recipients, and ‘welfare’ dollars circulate within the economy, are taxed, and are primarily received by WORKING adults…we all do (which includes benefit recipients).

          10. LarrytheG Avatar

            don’t be talking facts now.. it’s a real buzzkiller on the disinformation……….

          11. Why are white people on welfare? What do they have to do to get off welfare? Can a white person who dropped out of school and has no skills expect to find a job at a good wage? Why or why not?

          12. LarrytheG Avatar

            why is that a white or black thing?

          13. Because you made it one. Your claim that blacks are poor and on welfare because of Jim Crow, etc raises the question of why whites are poor and on welfare.

          14. LarrytheG Avatar

            I said that blacks family wealth is less on average because of the impacts of Jim Crow on the ancestors who were denied an equivalent education, equivalent jobs with benefits, etc.

            Be that as it may, the facts are that there are both blacks and whites on welfare but that’s
            not the same as family wealth per se but likely for many who did not get a decent education.

            Of course when someone says that blacks were attacked in riots by whites who were envious
            of the blacks economic status.. we’re into even another dimension!

          15. 1- what do whites have to do to get off welfare and out of poverty?
            2- what do blacks have to do to get off welfare and out of poverty?
            3- is there any overlap in the answers to 1 and 2?

          16. LarrytheG Avatar

            There’s a difference? In both cases, wouldn’t they need a better education
            and training as if they have kids, child care?

          17. Thank you. That’s what I have been saying. Now, will any program to make people self sufficient work if they don’t have the skills to continue after the program ends?
            Self sufficiency starts with getting an education. Do you think white people can go into the inner city and tell kids to stay in school, or will that message have to come from the black community? What about work habits and discipline? Of course, all of this has to be practiced by the parents and passed on to the children. That’s why I asked what the poor owe and why I say the black community has to change.

          18. LarrytheG Avatar

            some folks will make it on their own but most won’t. But the issue with low-income is where you can afford to live and what kind of school is in that neighborhood. If you cannot afford to live in a better neighborhood and the school itself is largely low-income students, much less opportunity than if you could afford a better neighborhood with far less students in poverty.

            If your family started out with no access to a public education, then the sons and daughter did get access but it was “separate but equal”, generational poverty is more likely but beyond that , during Jim Crow, if black, you’d not be able t get a job with benefits like good pay, health care and a pension. Blacks were often denied access to good jobs and had to work at whatever they could find and live in housing that was often in a poor neighborhood with schools not as good as schools in good neighborhoods.

            Generational poverty continued for many until something changed their situation, often the US military which Truman de-segregaged and gave access to blacks to get training and access to the same pay and benefits as whites.

            Other blacks left the South to go north to work in factories that had unions which again, gave them access to equal opportunities.

            Affirmative action gave better jobs with good pay and pensions to blacks which helped them to escape generational poverty.

            So the need for a better education is the SAME but in terms of numbers who had access there was disparities such that far more blacks had far less equal opportunities until laws changed.

          19. Your whole rebuttal is written in the past tense. I’m interested in solving today’s problem, not providing excuses for the continued failure of liberal policies. Blacks (and all citizens) deserve a good education. Why doesn’t the left provide it, and what do we do today to solve that problem? Do you see the black community as having an active role to play, or are they just passive recipients of white largess? Does black society have to change in any way, or is it only white society that has to change?

          20. LarrytheG Avatar

            the effects of systemic racism are still with us and still part of the problem. When the modern-day
            parents STILL do not have a good education and STILL do not have a decent job with benefits AND their child still does not get a good education… the cycle of poverty continues.

            What “role” would you have a black adult with a poor education and a job that does not pay enough for them to live without public assistance , play? What would you have blacks with poor educations living in poverty play? What role would you have for whites with poor educations living in poverty play?

          21. 1- improve their education and job skills
            2- stay sober and off drugs
            3- if unemployed, take a job, show up on time and learn work habits and develop a resume.
            etc…

          22. It’s behind a paywall. Can’t get to it.

          23. LarrytheG Avatar

            You can see the graph though, right? here’s a link:
            https://wapo.st/45sx9cl

          24. I think it shows the utter incompetence and failure of liberal policies on race and poverty over the last 50 years. You spent trillions of $, opened new gov’t agencies, passed thousands of new laws and achieved nada.

            In the process, you’ve been complicit is destroying the lives of at least 3 generations. Yet, when someone points out the failure and suggests trying something different, you revert to personal attacks on their intelligence and charges of racism. I think it’s despicable.

          25. LarrytheG Avatar

            What personal attack? If I said something that you received as such, point it out and I will aplogize.

            But you’re saying the clearly shown disparities are due to polices after Jim Crow? What policies?

            All 50 states have “liberal” policies that harm blacks?

          26. I said that the gap shown was NOT fixed by your policies over the last 50 years. Your solutions have failed.

          27. LarrytheG Avatar

            Right. And I asked what policies
            in all 50 states? Or what Federal
            policies? Does this mean that there
            actually is racial disparities that
            have never really been effectively
            resolved?

          28. The policies that you (the left) failed to implement correctly or the policies that should have been in the solution but which you never enacted. In either case, if one accepts as true your claim of damage from Jim Crow and accepts your chart as accurate, those alone prove your incompetence. YOUR claim and YOUR chart prove YOUR incompetence. No other evidence is needed.

            Did you not know about the damage from Jim Crow – incompetence.

            Did you not factor that damage into your solution – incompetence.

            Did you not monitor your project with way points and results testing – incompetence.
            It’s time for you to step aside and let the adults run the show.

          29. LarrytheG Avatar

            my policies? Nope. You saw the charts, the facts are clear that despite policies to rectify the damage, it has not been wholly successful. At least now you do admit that there actually ARE disparities due to policies and not just folks who won’t take education courses and such!

            The policies that disadvantaged blacks CONTINUED after Jim Crow in many places and even continue to to day despite effort by SOME to address them, refusal by others to do so.

            It’s not so much “incompetence” on those working to rectify as it is folks that continue to deny it’s
            a problem much less deal with it.

            It’s also way better because of some policies that HAVE worked but more is needed to make more progress. That’s part of the problem when some folks insist there is no damage from Jim Crow and follow on policies until they actually look at data they cannot refute. They go from denial to blame, eh?

          30. Excuses, excuses, excuses. You libs had 50 years, trillions of $, new gov’t agencies, and you still failed. Until you admit your incompetence, nothing will change, and the problem will persist.

          31. LarrytheG Avatar

            Reality. We’ve made much progress but more remains. The hardest part is to get folks to
            recognize the realities that the vestiges of Jim Crow and later policies STILL affects families
            and it’s clearly shown in the data. We have folks who want to continue the work to rectify and
            deniers and blamers….. same old same old…

          32. Good luck with that. If I was black man who wanted off the dem plantation, I would vote Trump.

          33. LarrytheG Avatar

            Well they’d be voting with the deniers of the realities of systemic racism for sure… but Trumps basic game is lies and disinformation to begin with.. and he’s got more than a few rubes who don’t deal well with facts and realities IMO.

          34. Excuses, excuses, excuses. You libs had 50 years, trillions of $, new gov’t agencies, and you still failed. Until you admit your incompetence, nothing will change, and the problem will persist.

          35. LarrytheG Avatar

            You think this is different for blacks than whites? same advice regardless of race?

            If someone has a poor education and is already working … and staying sober and off drugs… how would they “improve” their education if they can barely read and write… ?

          36. No, I think it’s exactly the same advice. You are the racist that wants to treat them differently.

            I can’t believe you asked how they would improve their skills. There are lots of programs available to adults who need to complete a GED or have literacy problems. Maybe if you weren’t so focused on blaming people who never owned a slave, we could have an intelligent conversation.

          37. LarrytheG Avatar

            Not blaming folks at all. I’m asking if jim crow laws had generational impacts.

          38. Not Today Avatar

            a) Because they’re low-wealth and low-income b) not be low-wealth or low-income and c) I have no idea. Do you? I do know that policies that intentionally hurt communities of color also hurt low-income/low-wealth white people too. It was all an acceptable part of living, mere collateral damage. For decades, white voters of means sacrificed some of their own to preserve their creme de la creme lifestyles and benefits. Now y’all are all tied up in one big, dysfunctional bunch together. How’s that working out in south/west VA?

  7. No problem – as long as the so called institute’s life lasts as long as the free money last…. not a dime from my taxes….and I don’t want my money to pay salaries nor benefits of the bureaucrats leading this gaggle.

    1. But getting your tax dollars is the entire point.

      Did you notice that Kimberly Jenkins Robinson gave welcoming remarks? Check out her work.

      A Federal Right to Education: Fundamental Questions for Our Democracy
      Edited by Kimberly Jenkins Robinson

      Part II, Chapter 8
      No Time to Lose: Why the United States Needs an Education Amendment to the US Constitution

      This chapter outlines the case for an Education Amendment to the US Constitution to reduce radical disparities in the allocation of resources and funds for the education of the nation’s public school students. The chapter argues that an Education Amendment is the best way to fundamentally reform the structural arrangements that are limiting the talent and productive capacities of millions of Americans. Such an amendment would provide a permanent framework for the exercise of federal power in the area of public education and provide sorely needed clarification of the federal role.

      https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctv1jhvp0q

      1. Not Today Avatar

        Heaven forbid academics pose thoughtful questions and arguments, amiright?

        1. Heaven forbid that citizens get involved locally for better schools rather than see them become federalized where it literally requires an act of Congress to change things.

          1. LarrytheG Avatar

            except that they’re NOT Federalized. They’re primarily local and state.

          2. Read the thread. It’s talking about a proposed Amendment to the Constitution to change that.

          3. LarrytheG Avatar

            I did. It just guarantees that whatever is done locally and in the State follows the Constitution. It does not stipulate how. It’s no different than many other Constitutional things that guarantee “rights”
            like voting rights or owing a gun, etc. Ya’ll seem to get confused sometimes IMO.

          4. Whenever the federal government gets involved in schools, they take power away from state and local governements, normally by providing funding with strings attached.

            Democrats and Republicans do this. History has shown that if you want to maintain local control, keep the federal government out.

            Here’s one example. Just to be even handed, I have chosen a requirement supported by conservatives.

            https://www.fcc.gov/consumers/guides/childrens-internet-protection-act

          5. Whenever the federal government gets involved in schools, they take power away from state and local governements, normally by providing funding with strings attached.

            Democrats and Republicans do this. History has shown that if you want to maintain local control, keep the federal government out.

            Here’s one example. Just to be even handed, I have chosen a requirement supported by conservatives.

            https://www.fcc.gov/consumers/guides/childrens-internet-protection-act

          6. Whenever the federal government gets involved in schools, they take power away from state and local governements, normally by providing funding with strings attached.

            Democrats and Republicans do this. History has shown that if you want to maintain local control, keep the federal government out.

            Here’s one example. Just to be even handed, I have chosen a requirement supported by conservatives.

            https://www.fcc.gov/consumers/guides/childrens-internet-protection-act

          7. Not Today Avatar

            Localities have shown no historic ability or desire to provide education on an equitable basis and THAT is what creates opportunities for federal intervention.

          8. It just guarantees that whatever is done locally and in the State follows the Constitution.

            That’s already required. All the amendment will do is remove power from the states and place it in the hands of the federal government.

            On that subject, how’s our quality of education been in this country since the cabinet-level federal department of education was created in 1980?

          9. LarrytheG Avatar

            it is advocating that the Constitution require EQUAL allocating of funding for education.

            The Federal DOE does not determine what is taught or how it is taught except for Title 1
            which is not the entire school. What DOE and NCLB REQUIRE is that states use standardized testing and make it transparent and available to taxpayers and parents which PRIOR to the law actually
            chose to NOT do. AND you’d not know SQUAT about school performance since 1980 if it
            where not for NAEP – a Federal program. You’re hammering the Feds essentially for REQUIRING
            that the states provide the data on school performance!

          10. Not Today Avatar

            Seeing as how Republicans in Congress can’t even govern themselves, how ‘real’ is the risk of congressional change/oversight? Or is it merely another straw man/bogeyman of your own making?

  8. DJRippert Avatar

    A fool and his money soon go separate ways.

    I can think of thousands of better ways to spend $4.9M but it’s private money and whoever the donor is can do what he or she (or zhe or they) want.

    1. Nancy Naive Avatar
      Nancy Naive

      Soros. There, now you can get angry again.

      1. DJRippert Avatar

        Soros’ funding of anti-justice district attorneys has done more to help the Republicans than just about anything done by any other liberal.

        Keep following Soros.

        1. LarrytheG Avatar

          the GOP has won a bunch of elections against Soros-funded Dems?

          1. DJRippert Avatar

            We’ll see in November.

          2. LarrytheG Avatar

            always hopeful… but you know how it will end up in places like NoVa… don’t
            have to “wait” to find out, right?

  9. UVa’s Ibram Kendi?

    Ibram X. Kendi’s fall is a cautionary tale — so was his rise

    The prospect of Kendi’s unraveling is not — or at least, is not only — the story of a huckster who was happy to cash in on America’s racial trauma, slapping his name on strange children’s books, including “Antiracist Baby” and “Goodnight Racism,” while raking in hundreds of dollars a minute to give short talks at American universities. Instead, the Kendi affair is yet another example of an age-old truism: White American elites on both sides of the political spectrum — academics, publishers, members of the media, corporate leaders — are always waiting in the wings to turn a shiny new Black intellectual into a mouthpiece for their political agenda.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/books/2023/09/28/ibram-kendi-stamped-center-antiracist-research/

    1. DJRippert Avatar

      I always said Kendi was an entrepreneurial genius. His overtly racist psycho-babble sold like hotcakes.

      1. I respect Ibram X. Kendi in the same way I respect P.T. Barnum.

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