Bacon Bits: This and That

Casinos credit positive for Virginia cities. Now that voters in Norfolk, Portsmouth, Danville and Bristol have approved casino gambling, Moody’s, the bond rating service, has issued a report concluding that the measures are “credit positive” for the four cities. Bristol expects a proposed casino development will create recurring revenues representing more than 25% of fiscal 2019 general fund revenues. Danville’s proposed casino would increase general fund revenues by nearly 29%. Norfolk’s project would boost general fund tax revenues by 4%, and Portsmouth’s by 7%.  Moody’s did not examine the potential negative and unmeasurable loss of tax revenue as casinos suck up dollars spent on other forms of local entertainment.

Casinos credit negative for problem gamblers. “Gambling can be fun,” acknowledges Carolyn Hawley, president of the Virginia Council on Problem Gambling. “However, it can be harmful to some people.” Virginia has reached a “critical tipping point” with gambling, and education, prevention and treatment programs are a priority. “More gamblers are seeking  us out with greater needs. We must be able to provide treatment, but we currently don’t have the resources,” Hawley said. However, in passing enabling legislation, the General Assembly “did the right thing” by providing some funding for a Problem Gambling Treatment and Support Fund. According to Moody’s, gaming taxes will be held in a Gaming Proceeds Fund, of which 0.8% would go to the gambling treatment fund.

$1 Million to investigate racism at VMI. Governor Ralph Northam is asking the General Assembly to approve $1 million to fund an independent investigation of alleged racism at the Virginia Military Institute. A Washington Post article described black cadets and alumni facing “relentless racism,” and Northam, a VMI graduate, announced an investigation into the military academy’s culture, policies, practices, and equity in disciplinary procedures.

Lip service for family involvement. While the Northam administration blames many of the public school system’s ills on structural racism and insufficient funding, Superintendent of Public Education James Lane does acknowledge that parental involvement is pivotal. Says Lane in a recent press release: “Family Engagement in Education Month is an opportunity to highlight the importance of engaging parents and families in the learning process, especially during this challenging school year when many of our students are learning from home because of the pandemic. I encourage all of our school divisions … to recognize the critical role families are playing in keeping students engaged, and to support their efforts.” The state is helping by providing a collection of family-engagement resources. It’s not much, but at least it’s something.

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64 responses to “Bacon Bits: This and That

  1. As for racism at VMI, the first to testify on the record should be cadet Northam. I’m not kidding.

    • I think spending a million dollars to investigate just one category of complaint at only one institution of higher learning is a big waste of taxpayer funds, and does a disservice to students at other institutions and those with complaints unrelated to racism. We no longer care about sexual harassment? Physical abuse? Unsafe conditions? Etc. Etc. Etc.

      How about this? All students at all institutions of higher learning should be made aware of the existing complain process.

      Complaint Process
      In accordance with § VAC 40-31-100 of the Virginia Administrative Code, the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) is responsible for investigating all written and signed student complaints against postsecondary educational institutions operating in Virginia.

      https://www.schev.edu/index/students-and-parents/resources/student-complaints

      And for the rest of the residents of the Commonwealth, how about if the Northam administration makes a commitment to follow-up on all complaints to all state agencies?

      For example, shouldn’t Mr. Sherlock get an answer to the many letters he has sent to our Attorney General? How about that?

      This would of course take resources, but a million smackers could go a long way if properly managed. They should be doing this already. Am I wrong?

      • If the existing complaint process is not working, where’s the Auditor of Public Accounts in all this?

        “The Auditor of Public Accounts (APA) is the legislative external auditor for the Commonwealth of Virginia’s agencies, colleges, universities and municipal courts.”

        Why doesn’t the APA ask questions and require documentation about each agency’s complaint process when performing audits? If there is a problem at VMI or elsewhere, why shouldn’t the millions we are already paying be used to expose it? That’s there job, or should be.

  2. Agree about Northam’s experience in VMI but also agree – all these years later, was the leadership at VMI lying about it?

    In terms of parental involvement in education – totally true. Public Schools do best when there is parental involvement.

    But the reality is that some parents got terrible educations themselves and just are not going to be able to perform as well-educated parents can in helping their kids.

    From there we get to the central point. If you don’t have a “good parent”, then you are screwed. Ipso Facto. That’s the answer from some because after they say that – it’s hand waving.

    • “From there we get to the central point. If you don’t have a “good parent”, then you are screwed. Ipso Facto. That’s the answer from some because after they say that – it’s hand waving.”

      Please describe what you think should be done for children who do not have “good parents”.

      • Socialism taken to its extreme provides the answer. Children are not to be raised by their parents. Instead, they are raised together in children’s houses so that everyone is equal.

        “In the kibbutz children’s house, we grew up speaking in plural, writes memoirist”

        https://www.timesofisrael.com/in-the-kibbutz-childrens-house-we-grew-up-speaking-in-plural-writes-memoirist/

        I don’t believe they are still doing this, but I’ve seen it first hand in Israel in the 1980s. If you head down the “everything must be equal” path, it gets pretty scary for parental rights.

        I obviously don’t favor enforced equality, but I think the public discussion about children’s success in school (and life) is greatly enhanced with the knowledge that parents play a critical role.

        “A few lessons the public schools need to learn: by Bill Bennett”

        “Parental involvement. A school is but one part of a child’s education. At most, an American child will spend less than 10 percent of his time from birth to age 18 in school. Obviously, this is not enough time to counter the influences that shape children outside of the school environment. Parental involvement is therefore the one true key to the academic success of a child. The school I have sketched would not only welcome parental involvement, it would require it. Parents, along with teachers and students, might sign a declaration of mutual responsibility, acknowledging their role in making sure their children arrive at school on time, with the proper attitude toward education and the school and with their homework completed. The teachers and administrators would welcome contact with and regular visits by parents. Parents would be involved with decision-making committees on finances, curriculum, and even the hiring and firing of teachers. Parents would also be expected to maintain an active role in their children’s education by getting them to bed on time, checking their homework, continuing the lessons of academic discipline, keeping their expectations high and their encouragement strong.”

        https://world.wng.org/2001/04/a_few_lessons_the_public_schools_need_to_learn_by_bill_bennett

      • For children with an absolutely terrible parent (singular) there is probably nothing that can, given political realities, be done.

        But parental quality is a spectrum. There are parents who would like their children to get a real education, but who cannot help them very much to achieve it. We need to address our remedies at this group.

        The remedy we need is School Choice: real school choice. It’s something that even some liberals can get behind — that minority among them who actually care about ‘under-privileged’ children, instead of just wanting to use their community as a source of votes.

        Here is the proof of concept: Google ‘Michaela’ and ‘Brent’. This is a ‘Free School’ in the United Kingdom. (Free Schools are an innovation of a previous Conservative government in the UK. They’re schools started by individuals, free of state control.) It’s in a ‘deprived area’. Most of its students are non-white. It’s been going for several years, and just last year its students sat their ‘GCSE’ exams. (More or less the equivalent of a high school diploma, although taken at 16.) They got stellar results — read the articles, remembering that in the crazy British grading system (1-9), 7 and above is equivalent to an ‘A’.

        For some reason, this amazing school’s success has received little publicity. Of course the Left and the teachers unions and EdSchool establishment hate it. And in the UK, Conservative Members of Parliament all send their children to expensive private schools, and couldn’t care less what kind of education the working class kids get. (In fact, since these kids will now compete with private school kids for entry into the top universities, they probably don’t want to see more ‘Michaelas’.)

        We ought to be championing School Choice, combined with common-sense traditional methods of teaching (which Michaela has, in spades). Not only is it the right thing to do, but it will split the Democratic Party’s supporters between amibitious parents, and slaves of the teachers unions.

  3. To augment what I mentioned previously, WTOP radio reports (as of yesterday) the Maryland Casinos are doing surprisingly well during COVID. Although down 50% in attendance, the profits are only down 1% from last year. MGM National Harbor is not doing quite so good, being down 5%, but that’s probably not too shabby — all things considered.

    • The pro/con arguments on Casinos in Virginia reminded me of the back and forth over liquor by the drink. It was going to absolutely RUIN Virginia if you believed the opponents… and before them… getting rid of the Blue Laws…

  4. When will the media ask Northam if he supports religious tests for federal judges like the vice president-elect does? Is bigotry wrong or only some types of bigotry wrong in the mind of the Governor?

  5. Under U.S. Constitution, Article 6, Section 3: “… but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.”

    Anyone who says or insinuates that the religious beliefs of some judicial nominees “disqualifies” them from being confirmed is ignoring the plain language of the U.S. Constitution.

  6. I know this isn’t all that important but in case no one noticed, Biden won the presidential election. Suggest many of you start boning up on symptoms for dementia. I am sure we’ll be hearing a lot about it.

    • Really? I didn’t know all the court cases have been settled and the electors voted. Silly me.

      “Monday after the second Wednesday in December of presidential election years is set (3 U.S.C. §7) as the date on which the electors meet and vote. In 2020, the meeting is on December 14.”

      https://crsreports.congress.gov/product/pdf/IF/IF11641#:~:text=December%2014%2C%202020%3A%20Electors%20Vote,meeting%20is%20on%20December%2014.

    • And Trump won in 2016, but that did not stop Democrats from trying to destroy his presidency from day one. I’m no Trump fan and am not sorry that I won’t see him blathering on TV every day. But sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander. It’s perfectly appropriate for the right to work every single moment between now and January 2025 to destroy the Biden-Harris administration. Raising the fact he picked a religious bigot for the number two spot is a good place to start.

    • James Wyatt Whitehead V

      No worries. The “Zero Year Curse” will kick in soon.

      • A threat? Given the majority of their fates and that one might assume you’re not Typhoid Mary.

        • James Wyatt Whitehead V

          If you look at Presidential history the zero year has not been kind to many. Of course I hope whom ever is inaugurated in January serves a full term and lives a long and useful life. But the zero year was tough on William Henry Harrison, Zac Taylor, Uncle Abe, James Garfield, William McKinley, Warren Harding, FDR, JFK, and nearly RWR.

          • Well, Biden will be 78 when he takes office. Aged, but not necessarily unproductive.

            “Lyon Gardiner Tyler Jr., the grandson of the nation’s 10th president, died Sept. 26 (2020) in Franklin, Tennessee, according to his obituary. He was 95. Tyler’s grandfather, John Tyler, became the first vice president to ascend to the presidency when William Henry Harrison died on April 4, 1841.”

            Tyler may not have been 78 when in office, but clearly he was ‘productive’ in those later years. The country appears so much younger when 3 generations covers nearly its entire history.

            BTW, he is survived by a brother, I think.

          • And, I’m familiar with the curse, and that Lincoln’s secretary was named Kennedy, and that Kennedy’s secretary was named Lincoln, and that the night before he was shot, Lincoln was in Monroe, Maryland, and coincidentally…

          • James Wyatt Whitehead V

            I met the brother about 20 years ago. Skipped AP teacher training at Wand M to tour Tyler’s Sherwood Forest. We hit it off pretty good when I explained how Tyler’s 1st wife Letitia Christian was my 5th great grand aunt and therefore we were long lost 2nd cousins 4 times removed. I got the upstairs tour nobody gets to see. Our conversation began with the troubles of crab grass, he was fighting the weeds and I gave a few tips he had not heard about.

            2020 is a wacky year. 2021 will be as well with different actors.

          • Easiest solution to crabgrass is chickweed. Moss works, but you need to wait decades for the oaks to grow. Guess his granddad shoulda planted acorns.

            Virginia sucks for grasses. People waste a lot of money trying to grow a waste product. Might as well throw dog poop in The Bay.

  7. Am sure there will be oodles on voter fraud, especially mail ins. Meanwhile, what to do about bannon? Should Dr. Fauci be beheaded? Love this clown show but it has to end at some point. Our beloved and venerated President is taking some badly needed time off at the golf course. Did he really win in a landslide? Or was that last time? Was his inauguration the largest ever? Will his in January be bigger still?. Why not send us a legal timeline to veneration and completion of monumental task of beloved leader?

    • Wow. The widest Electoral College spread EVER (2016, according to Trump) is likely to be outdone by 4.

      Trump’s inauguration may not have been bigger than Obama’s, but it will be bigger than Joe’s. Biden won’t put people at risk for a large crowd. But then, if he uses “social distancing”, the crowd will extend to Richmond.

    • As I write, the betting odds put a Biden victory at just under 95%. If I had a lottery ticket with a 5% chance of payout, I would not throw it away.

      https://www.electionbettingodds.com/

      Al Gore set the precedent of taking these matters to court. This summer Biden assembled over 600 attorneys to fight in court if he came up short. In the face of that, did anyone think Trump wouldn’t respond in kind?

      “‘If it’s close – watch out’: Biden says he has 600 lawyers ready to fight election ‘chicanery’ by Trump”
      William Cummings USA TODAY
      July 2, 2020

      • You can put that lottery ticket in the circular file now.

        • I guess we’ve finally found one issue where we should take Biden at his word.

          Democratic Presidential Nominee Joe Biden recently bragged that Democrats have created the “most extensive and inclusive voter fraud organization in the history of American politics.”

          “We’re in a situation where we have put together, and you guys did it for our administration…President Obama’s administration before this. We have put together, I think, the most extensive and inclusive voter fraud organization in the history of American politics,” he said.

          https://thefederalist.com/2020/10/24/joe-biden-says-democrats-created-the-most-extensive-and-inclusive-voter-fraud-organization-in-american-history/#.X6Siy_0BTRE.twitter

          The fraud and irregularities in this election may not have been enough to sway the outcome, but we should all have an interest in seeing to it that they are properly investigated, and when appropriate prosecuted. Elections are about more that just who wins. It’s also important that the entire electorate have confidence in the system. Over 70 million people voted for Donald Trump. Their concerns should be important too. Biden talks about bringing people together. It’s time to do more than just talk.

          If the situation were reversed, with Biden holding a lead in several key states only to have the outcome reversed days after the election, would we have peace in the streets or violence? Can you even allow yourself to answer that question honestly?

          With George Floyd , there was an investigation which resulted in all 4 officers charged. Nonetheless, violence erupted in cities across the country, with 570 arrest in Minneapolis alone. How much violence might we have seen if this election didn’t go their way?

          • You do realize that was manipulated video. No wonder your view is distorted. You have ocular rectalitis.

            “Greene is circulating a bit of manipulated video that originally started with a tweet from a Republican National Committee official more than a week ago and then was quickly spread by Eric Trump, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany and others. It was blocked on Facebook, and Twitter also quickly labeled Greene’s tweet as misleading.”

            But, Trump DID say, “We won the evangelicals, we won with young, we won with old, we won with highly educated, we won with poorly educated! I love the poorly educated. We’re the smartest people, we’re the most loyal people.”

            Of course one could just read the last 3 sentences and sum up the last four years.

          • I know that’s not what he meant, but when has the President been given that same consideration? Like many of Biden’s gaffs, it was funny, so I referenced it.

            Nice dodge of my question. Here it is again in case you missed it.

            “If the situation were reversed, with Biden holding a lead in several key states only to have the outcome reversed days after the election, would we have peace in the streets or violence? Can you even allow yourself to answer that question honestly?”

          • Trump threatens to affect the operation of the Post Office and we’re suprised that people rushed to vote in-person ahead of time?

            geeze.. irony?

          • “I know that’s not what he meant,”

            So you deliberately spread a lie to pose a hypothetical that has absolutely nothing to do with the lie? Good job.

          • NN – I quoted his words. So you’ve never been sarcastic?

            And you still haven’t answered my question.

            Larry – The Trump administration has been continuing the downsizing of postal services because of reduced demand that has been going on for years under Obama. It was paused for the election, but I’m sure will continue under Biden.

          • Well that wound up misthreaded…

            No side has exclusive rights to protest nor violence. Was there violence in 2016? Were there protests? Oh yeah, there were protests and demonstrations. Repugnican or Demorat, we are noneless Americans. It’s what we do.

            As for fraud, what were the result of Trump’s 15-month long investigation into the 3 million fake votes he swears he knew were cast for Hillary? Bupkus. That should have been a clue about your boy, along with that Kenyan birth certificate.

            Massive fraud would be tough simply because of the inefficiency in the system. 50 different sets of rules and regs with 438 districts and God knows how many precincts. Fraud in rural areas would be easier than in the cities. Fewer eyes, but then Podunk Indiana showing up with more votes than people is gonna be obvious, and even then a minuscule effect. So massive fraud would have to take place in the cities where more people from both side are watching.

            Still trying to figure out what the bozos from Virginia with an SUV of downloaded sample ballots thought they were going to do with them. Friends of yours?

            Of course, you could believe in Rudy…. and a flat Earth.

        • No side has exclusive rights to protest nor violence. Was there violence in 2016? Were there protests? Oh yeah, there were protests and demonstrations. Repugnican or Demorat, we are noneless Americans. It’s what we do.

          As for fraud, what were the result of Trump’s 15-month long investigation into the 3 million fake votes he swears he knew were cast for Hillary? Bupkus. That should have been a clue about your boy, along with that Kenyan birth certificate.

          Massive fraud would be tough simply because of the inefficiency in the system. 50 different sets of rules and regs with 438 districts and God knows how many precincts. Fraud in rural areas would be easier than in the cities. Fewer eyes, but then Podunk Indiana showing up with more votes than people is gonna be obvious, and even then a minuscule effect. So massive fraud would have to take place in the cities where more people from both side are watching.

          Still trying to figure out what the bozos from Virginia with an SUV of downloaded sample ballots thought they were going to do with them. Friends of yours?

          Of course, you could believe in Rudy…. and a flat Earth.

          • If you are going to use the term repugnican to describe one of the two major crime families controlling this country, you provide some balance by using the term demoncrat to describe the other.

          • I meant to. Consider it so. Missed the “n”.

            But Demorat works to some extent, yes/no?

          • Yes- either is acceptable – and I apologize for not noticing the missing ‘c’ in your initial post – I read it as democrat.

            I’m sorry about that – I would not have “corrected” you if I had not misread your post.

          • No problem. I make mistakes occasionally. Glad you caught it. I really did mean Demonrat. Turn around is fair play.

          • Demonrat is even better. Let’s use that from now on.

          • When deserved. Consider yesterday. Yesterday, Romney became more of a Republican, and less of a Repugnican. Lindsey, OTOH,…

    • Mr. Galuszka,

      At this point, Biden looks to have won. How many cities have burned as a result?

      The President is pursuing his legal rights, which is exactly what Biden would do if the situation were reversed. When recounts and legal options are settled, he will concede if that’s what is required.

      “The president believes, he’s also being encouraged by his family, that he owes it to the 71 million people who voted for him to make sure that every legal vote has been counted and to make sure to the best of his ability that every illegal vote that might have made it through was not counted,” Roberts continued. “Now, everybody’s wondering what might happen with the president eventually. I’m told that when he goes through this legal process, and there’s also recounts involved as well … and comes out the other end, if there is no path to a second term, then the president will graciously concede and he will cooperate in an orderly transition of power.”

      https://www.dailywire.com/news/breaking-trump-campaign-taking-numerous-new-legal-actions-in-election-battle

  8. NN that can’t be right. You are about to enter the BACON ZONE.

  9. Biden still finds religious bigotry acceptable, assuming he still has the mental capacity to remember what Harris said and understand the implications. Rock tossing is going to be fun. I’m beginning to understand why my liberal friends kept it up for four years.

  10. You mean the “Apprentice” stories were wrong?

  11. You mean the President-elect, who happens to be Catholic, doesn’t object to determining if a Judicial nominee is going to be a Justice, who also happens to be a Catholic, won’t be a Catholic Justice?

    • Biden’s religious beliefs don’t cancel Harris’ religious bigotry. Would your response be the same had a Muslim ignored the application of a religious test to a Muslim by a non-Muslim? Of course not.

      Kamala Harris argued for the application of an unconstitutional religious test to a Catholic nominee for a district court judgeship. That makes her a bigot. Biden’s choice of Harris as vice presidential candidate shows that, despite his religious affiliation, he tolerates, indeed, promotes religious bigotry. The Democratic Party is the party of religious bigotry. And this is shared by much of the MSM.

      • Show me. Yes, I’m from Missouri by way of my father. And please, don’t just reference someone else’s worthless, factless opinion.

        • Are suggesting Senator Harris did not challenge Brian Buescher in January 2019 about his membership in the Knights of Columbus as a disqualifying condition to be a federal judge? Are you suggesting that she did not suggest he should resign? Are you suggesting that the United States passed a resolution condemning the application of religious tests? https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/5686542-Sasse-Resolution-on-Religious-Tests.html

          Are you suggesting that Democratic Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard (Hawaii) didn’t write a column in the Hill, where she wrote “While I oppose the nomination of Brian Buescher to the U.S. District Court in Nebraska, I stand strongly against those who are fomenting religious bigotry, citing as disqualifiers Buescher’s Catholicism and his affiliation with the Knights of Columbus.”? https://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/religious-rights/424362-elected-leaders-who-weaponize-religion-are-playing-a

          Yet Joe Biden picked her for his ticket. It’s not hard to draw the conclusion that he doesn’t care about religious bigotry.

          • She asked a question of a judicial nominee if he was aware that a organization of which he was a member was in direct opposition to the law of the land. It was no different than asking, oh say, David Duke his position on Brown v. The Board of Education by pointing out that the KKK is in opposition.

            Antigone is a wonderful story but she doesn’t belong on the bench. You generally refer to that as an “activist judge”.

            As to the Resolution, Congress passes all manner of resolutions. The Texas Legislature once honored Albert DeSalvo for his work in population control.

          • But, NN… that narrative is running rampant on right wing media!

            The naysayers will NOT be denied!

          • Scratch that. Not the “law of the land”, a recognized basic human right.

          • Larry, the GOP has lost all semblance to a conservative party.

            The greatest contribution to the US by the Witch of Wasilla, Sarah Palin, was when the idiot woman relayed the story of her giving birth to her special needs kid. She told of how the tests confirmed Down. She then said that after great thought and consideration she “chose” to have the child, something she then decided other women shouldn’t have the right to do.

          • “She asked a question of a judicial nominee if he was aware that a organization of which he was a member was in direct opposition to the law of the land.”

            Give me a break. Just a few years ago the prohibition against gay marriage was the “law of the land.” Capital punishment is the “law of the land” in many states.

            So what exactly is a recognized human right? The right to kill your unborn child?

          • Yes.

          • Roe is currently the standard for abortion. That was ruled on by the Court and upheld.

            Outside of the regulations assigned in Roe, there are no legal grounds to conduct an abortion. The problem with this situation is, it’s not Law but rather stare decisis. If you wish to make it Law, use the Legislature as that’s the only source where it can originate.

            I honestly don’t care if you want to have an abortion, that’s between you and your God. However, there needs to be a standard otherwise it just gets abused and becomes birth control. It also should never be covered by insurance, you want it. You pay for it. If that’s a price to steep, instead of spending Billions on Elections, put them in a fund for abortions.

          • Rights are not granted by laws, albeit apparently, when it involves the rights of minorities and the non-ruling classes, they must be constantly protected from them.

            Or, as a devout Christian Evangelical Republican coworker once said of his Party, “They just cannot understand that they cannot legislate morality.”

          • NN your response is off point. Roe is the law. But it is not to be challenged, according to the left. (Personally, I have no trouble with the ability of a woman to get an abortion.)

            But the right to carry arms and the ability of the state to execute convicted murderers are also the law. But no one challenges the ability of people to advocate against those positions. What is the difference?

            Try answering the questions. You can’t, so you toss more snark. There’s a time and place for snark. But the bottom line is that the vice president-elect of the United States is a religious bigot and that’s OK with you.

  12. The church bells in Paris, fireworks in London.

    The world celebrates the New Colossus’ Lazarus syndrome…

    • James Wyatt Whitehead V

      Fireworks in my neighborhood too. Called the cops. Least I can do. One neighbor down the street put up a new political sign.

      “Ballot Laws Matter”

      I thought it was clever.

      • You would. Shoo kids off the yard, too?

        • James Wyatt Whitehead V

          Ohhh yeah. Charged them with trespassing too. All four corners of the property clearly posted. Message has been received on Waterloo Street. Only property onthe block that hasn’t been broken into, something stolen, something damaged. Unsupervised teens can only lead to a few things late at night. Now the little kids are different. I routinely have the little boys and girls over to play with the dog or play football/soccer in my backyard. We do have a good time as well. Flashlight tag the other evening was fun. Those kids had not heard about that game.

          • Well, that’s not creepy. (Sarcasm alert)

            You clearly have a void in the teen occupation endeavors in whatever area in which you live.

  13. I think you would find something wrong at every school in the state if you spent $1M to investigate it. In the case of VMI, that is over 5% of what the school gets from the state every year.

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