The Battle Over African-American History

“Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.” — George Orwell

by James A. Bacon

One version of “unwhitewashed” history.

The Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) is working on revisions to an advanced-placement course on African-American history, and the forces of wokeness are agitating to preserve the ideological framework they wrote into the course description four years ago. In short, they seek to ensure that the full four centuries of the African-American experience in Virginia is interpreted through the prism of systemic racism.

That’s not the spin on the story you’ll read in The Washington Post, of course. In an article published today the Post accuses the Youngkin administration of foisting its worldview on K-12 school students by, among other things, “striking some references to ‘white supremacy’ and ‘systemic racism.’”

There was plenty of racism and oppression in Virginia’s past, to be sure, and the course doesn’t shy away from any of that, according to evidence in the Post’s own article. What’s at issue is the conceptual framework for thinking about race, slavery, Jim Crow, civil rights, and contemporary race relations. The wokesters, who approach history as the playing out of intersecting forms of oppression, aren’t content to have teachers present their ideology as one way to think about race relations. They want the course to reflect their viewpoint throughout.

American Oversight, a watchdog group that pursues among other things “threats to democracy” and “Trump accountability,” used the Freedom of Information Act to review revisions to the African-American history course content. The group supplied the documents to the Post, which duly wrote an article advancing the narrative that Youngkin is whitewashing dark aspects of America’s past in Virginia’s K-12 schools.

The course was announced in 2020 under Governor Ralph Northam, and VDOE developed it in partnership with “WHRO Public Media, and committees of history and social science public school educators, university historians, and college professors,” according to the Post. Launched in 2020-21, the course is now taught in 45 school districts and 89 schools.

Did the scholars who designed the course have an ideological agenda?

The Post doesn’t broach that possibility. But it’s clear that the critics of Youngkin’s proposed changes, which have not yet gone into effect, do have an agenda, as I shall explain.

Why did the Youngkin administration revisit the course? Here is how the Post frames the explanation: “The changes to the elective come after the state was embroiled in controversy for revisions to its history standards, and as there have been efforts and legislation across the country to limit what schools teach about topics such as race, racism and sexuality in the classroom.”

What Team Youngkin wants to “limit” is the imposition of a leftist interpretive framework that is, in essence, critical theory packaged for high schoolers.

That much is evident from the Post’s own reporting, which the writer and editors are too blind to see. In a small detail that reveals much, the article mentions in passing that the Youngkinites are removing “lessons on implicit bias and equity.” Implicit bias and equity are integral to the intersectional-oppression paradigm and essential to the interpretation of modern-day America as a systemically racist nation.

The critics betray their biases in many other ways, as seen in the WaPo table below that highlights supposedly egregious changes to the course’s learning objectives. As you read these, remember, these are not to be taught as possible arguments that teachers and students might make about African-American history — they are the learning objectives themselves.

Let’s proceed point by point.

Rise of racism. The Northam-era formulation presupposes that colonial-era governments used slavery as a “mechanism for enforcement” of racism. In other words, racism came first, then slavery arose as a mechanism to enforce it. This aligns with the view that racism is an eradicable trait of “whiteness” and has been intrinsic to America since its founding. But the formulation gets the causation reversed. The early English settlers had no fixed views about race. Slavery came first, and in a complex interplay of forces, racism as a belief system evolved as a justification for the practice.

Team Youngkin is not downplaying discussion of racism, discrimination or slavery, as it is accused of doing, but is changing the template for understanding those historical phenomena.

White supremacist customs. The next example betrays the ideological suppositions of the Northam history writers: Discuss the impact of “White supremacist customs and laws” on veterans following World War II. Racism and segregation were all too real in 1945 America, but the concept of “White supremacy” as presented here must be understood in the context of critical theory. It conveys an understanding that White racism is an ineradicable trait, and it presupposes that social structures in 2024 are systemically racist as well.

The Youngkin formulation acknowledges that Black WWII veterans faced discrimination when they came home but does not contain the loaded term of “White supremacy.” The re-write does not block classroom discussion of White supremacy as one among many concepts for understanding Black history. Rather, it disallows using White supremacy, with all its connotations, as a foundational building block for the course.

UVA eugenics. The next offense in the minds of Youngkin critics was changing the wording regarding the study of eugenics at the University of Virginia. The Northam scholars stacked the deck by pre-supposing that a purpose of eugenics in Virginia was to “control African Americans.” That is a debatable proposition, to be sure. Eugenics was a popular idea across the political spectrum, in Europe as well as America, and the odious idea of cleansing the gene pool applied to mentally ill and feeble-minded Whites as well. One is entitled to advance the argument that a motivation in Virginia was to “control” African Americans, but that is an interpretation of history rather than foundational fact. Deleting the language from the learning objectives does not forbid teachers and students from discussing that interpretation; it eliminates the mandate that it be taught as dogma.

Redlining. A fourth alleged offense committed by the Youngkinites is excising language presupposing that the past practice of redlining, banned in 1968, continues to have a negative impact on African-Americans 56 years later. Team Youngkin did not ban the discussion of redlining. Rather, it clarified that redlining occurred in the past. It is progressive dogma that echoes of redlining reverberate to this day as a cause of African-American poverty. But, again, that is a debatable interpretation of history, not inarguable fact. Team Youngkin was correct to delete such an ideological presupposition from the course objectives.

Youngkin critics appear to be incapable of drawing a distinction between things they think to be true, but are in fact contested, and things that should be taught as indisputably true.

“White supremacy and institutional racism does not exist according to this document,” Derrick Lanois, a Norfolk State University history professor who helped to develop and implement the course, told the Post.

No, the revisions do not assert that white supremacy and institutional racism do not exist. Rather, they prohibit treating the white-supremacy/institutional racism narrative as dogma that the course should be structured around.

The Post seems unable to grasp the fact that Lanois and his co-course designers, not Team Youngkin, are the ones who larded the course with ideological bias. Actions the critics see as efforts to “whitewash” history are better seen efforts to undo previous “blackwashing” of that history, make the course more ideologically neutral, and prevent the foreclosing of diverse ways to view Virginia’s history.


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37 responses to “The Battle Over African-American History”

  1. walter smith Avatar
    walter smith

    I think the revisions are still too wimpy, except for the UVA one, which should be expanded to mention that Eugenics was pushed by "progressives" (ie Democrats) and fleshing out its ties to the American Birth Control League, now known as Planned Parenthood, which was a strong proponent of limiting the reproduction of "undesirables" and even today its "healthcare" clinics are predominantly located in minority neighborhoods. Can't take the spots off that leopard!
    Also, Planned Parenthood had the "Negro Project" and one of the big proponents was the head of the KKK…of Massachusetts!
    And let's not forget Buck v Bell – "three generations of imbeciles are enough" – forced sterilization from our "betters" – sound remotely familiar anyone? – let's make sure Woodrow Wilson and Progressivism are as fully blamed as they need to be. (And if we get there, let's get rid of the 16th and 17th Amendments – another "gift" from those people)

  2. Dick Hall-Sizemore Avatar
    Dick Hall-Sizemore

    You and Youngkin can deny it all you want to, but there is no doubt that systemic racism and the concept of white supremacy have been at the root of Virgina government and society.

    It stated in the colonial era. In 1680, the legislature enacted a law preventing any “negroe” from raising a hand to a white person. In 1705, the legislature decreed that all property of slaves be seized and sold with the proceeds going to help the white poor. https://www.brookings.edu/a

    In 1902, Virginia adopted a new constitution. Carter Glass, one of the principal architects of that document, declared that its provisions were designed to “eliminate the darkey as a political factor in this State in less than 5 years, so that in no single county . . . will there be the least concern felt for the complete supremacy of the white race in the affairs of government.” https://www.brennancenter.o

    I grew up in Virginia in the 1950s. I can assure you that every aspect of living—which church or school one attended, which public rest room or drinking fountain one used, which restaurant one ate in, who one married, what neighborhood one lived in, which recreational facilities one used, and on and on—had one basic factor in common, one’s race. In many cases, it was explicit; in the remainder of the cases, it was implicit.

    You complain about progressives viewing society through the prism of race. White Virginians have been using that prism to their benefit for hundreds of years. The difference now is that whites are no longer the beneficiaries of that perspective, and they suddenly feel that race should not be a factor.

  3. Dick Hall-Sizemore Avatar
    Dick Hall-Sizemore

    You and Youngkin can deny it all you want to, but there is no doubt that systemic racism and the concept of white supremacy have been at the root of Virgina government and society.

    It stated in the colonial era. In 1680, the legislature enacted a law preventing any “negroe” from raising a hand to a white person. In 1705, the legislature decreed that all property of slaves be seized and sold with the proceeds going to help the white poor. https://www.brookings.edu/a

    In 1902, Virginia adopted a new constitution. Carter Glass, one of the principal architects of that document, declared that its provisions were designed to “eliminate the darkey as a political factor in this State in less than 5 years, so that in no single county . . . will there be the least concern felt for the complete supremacy of the white race in the affairs of government.” https://www.brennancenter.o

    I grew up in Virginia in the 1950s. I can assure you that every aspect of living—which church or school one attended, which public rest room or drinking fountain one used, which restaurant one ate in, who one married, what neighborhood one lived in, which recreational facilities one used, and on and on—had one basic factor in common, one’s race. In many cases, it was explicit; in the remainder of the cases, it was implicit.

    You complain about progressives viewing society through the prism of race. White Virginians have been using that prism to their benefit for hundreds of years. The difference now is that whites are no longer the beneficiaries of that perspective, and they suddenly feel that race should not be a factor.

  4. DJRippert Avatar
    DJRippert

    The study of history is full of strange stories. Here is one:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Ellison#:~:text=William%20Ellison%20Jr.,before%20the%20American%20Civil%20War.

  5. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
    James Wyatt Whitehead

    If Team Youngkin is concerned about "what" is being taught in AP Black History, then they should be concerned about "who" is teaching the course. Once the bell (or door chime nowadays) rings and the door closes, the instructor can do whatever they want. Team Youngkin will be relying totally on that teacher's integrity.

  6. Eric the half a troll Avatar
    Eric the half a troll

    “It conveys an understanding that White racism is an ineradicable trait, and it presupposes that social structures in 2024 are systemically racist as well.”

    It does no such thing. You are making things up here to provide cover for Youngkin and what Black WWII vets faced upon their return to the US South was far more than “discriminatory practices”. Google Joe Nathan Roberts and Isaiah Nixon for two examples.

  7. Dick Hall-Sizemore Avatar
    Dick Hall-Sizemore

    You and Youngkin can deny it all you want to, but there is no doubt that systemic racism and the concept of white supremacy have been at the root of Virgina government and society.

    It stated in the colonial era. In 1680, the legislature enacted a law preventing any “negroe” from raising a hand to a white person. In 1705, the legislature decreed that all property of slaves be seized and sold with the proceeds going to help the white poor. https://www.brookings.edu/a

    In 1902, Virginia adopted a new constitution. Carter Glass, one of the principal architects of that document, declared that its provisions were designed to “eliminate the darkey as a political factor in this State in less than 5 years, so that in no single county . . . will there be the least concern felt for the complete supremacy of the white race in the affairs of government.” https://www.brennancenter.o

    I grew up in Virginia in the 1950s. I can assure you that every aspect of living—which church or school one attended, which public rest room or drinking fountain one used, which restaurant one ate in, who one married, what neighborhood one lived in, which recreational facilities one used, and on and on—had one basic factor in common, one’s race. In many cases, it was explicit; in the remainder of the cases, it was implicit.

    You complain about progressives viewing society through the prism of race. White Virginians have been using that prism to their benefit for hundreds of years. The difference now is that whites are no longer the beneficiaries of that perspective, and they suddenly feel that race should not be a factor.

    1. James Wyatt Whitehead Avatar
      James Wyatt Whitehead

      That was a long long time ago now Mr. Dick. It was 66 years ago when Warren County High School integrated after 2 school years of massive resistance. Take heart. I drive down Main Street in Front Royal nearly every day during the school year. I see the pre-teens and the teenies all the time. 66 years later you would never have guessed this town was in the crucible of integration. The kids do not choose their friends or relationships on race anymore. My ears and eyes tell me this. I would like to think that the small town kids of Front Royal have unknowingly embraced something said by MLK in 1965:
      "Our aim must never be to defeat or humiliate the white man, but to win his friendship and understanding. We must come to see that the end we seek is a society at peace with itself, a society that can live with its conscience. And that will be a day not of the white man, not of the black man. That will be the day of man as man."
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/91f28fc692ac058951fa99e6cbd24e7e4470c4e2a0dcbc50e578f445c7904297.jpg

    2. DJRippert Avatar
      DJRippert

      The 1950s are as far from today as the 1880s were from the 1950s. I'm 65, grew up (mostly) in Virginia and never saw segregated schools, separate water fountains, etc.

      I'm all for teaching the realities of history. However, there was a hullabaloo a few months ago when liberals found a statement in a course that claimed some slaves learned valuable skills and earned enough money to buy their freedom and become successful freemen.

      Guess what?

      That happened. You can read about such a case if you chase the link in my comment above. William Ellison was a slave that learned a valuable skill, bought his freedom, started a successful plantation, volunteered to fight f0r the Confederacy (along with his sons) and ended up the largest Black slaveholder (out of 171 Black slaveholders) in South Carolina at the start of the Civil War. Ellison owned 68 slaves.

      How does that happen in a binary world where all Whites were considered superior and all Blacks inferior?

      According to scholarship done in the 1920s by Carter G. Woodson, 12 percent of all free black heads of families in Virginia in 1830 owned slaves.

      And who was Carter G. Woodson?

      https://encyclopediavirginia.org/entries/woodson-carter-g-1875-1950/

      1. Not Today Avatar
        Not Today

        You are still alive. So are my parents. So is Reggie Jackson. Racist history is alive in them and in me and in others raised by confederate apologists. I recently reconnected with an old friend from another southern state. Thirty years later, he animatedly shared his feelings about the numerous times we were called n—-ers and urged not to retaliate lest a deadly brawl break out at football games. His words, “I’m so glad you got out too.” Many didn’t. Souls crushed. Scars aplenty, visible and invisible.

      2. Not Today Avatar
        Not Today

        You are still alive. So are my parents. So is Reggie Jackson. Racist history is alive in them and in me and in others raised by confederate apologists. I recently reconnected with an old friend from another southern state. Thirty years later, he animatedly shared his feelings about the numerous times we were called n—-ers and urged not to retaliate lest a deadly brawl break out at football games. His words, “I’m so glad you got out too.” Many didn’t. Souls crushed. Scars aplenty, visible and invisible.

      3. Not Today Avatar
        Not Today

        You are still alive. So are my parents. So is Reggie Jackson. Racist history is alive in them and in me and in others raised by confederate apologists. I recently reconnected with an old friend from another southern state. Thirty years later, he animatedly shared his feelings about the numerous times we were called n—-ers and urged not to retaliate lest a deadly brawl break out at football games. His words, “I’m so glad you got out too.” Many didn’t. Souls crushed. Scars aplenty, visible and invisible.

      4. Not Today Avatar
        Not Today

        You are still alive. So are my parents. So is Reggie Jackson. Racist history is alive in them and in me and in others raised by confederate apologists. I recently reconnected with an old friend from another southern state. Thirty years later, he animatedly shared his feelings about the numerous times we were called n—-ers and urged not to retaliate lest a deadly brawl break out at our HS football games. His words, “I’m so glad you got out too.” Many didn’t. Souls crushed. Scars aplenty, visible and invisible. Twisting the will to master a craft and buy limited freedom (it could be and was sometimes revoked/stolen) for yourself or others into some kind of benevolent gift from slavery is sickening. Even Byron Donalds couldn’t choke that insult down. Maybe because he knows the full story of white men systematically attacking/murdering/stealing from uppity black people who had the audacity to be successful and proud of it. The worst part is that it’s still happening. Now white men are trying to steal our truths, our actual lived experiences, and bury them instead. You can do better than to hang your argument on the 19th century equivalent of uncle Clarence Thomas.

        1. DJRippert Avatar
          DJRippert

          "You are still alive." Very good. Perhaps your skills align more with biology than history.

          "Racist history is alive in them and in me and in others raised by confederate apologists."

          You were raised by Confederate apologists? That's a shame. I was raised by a family whose ancestors fought for the Union in the US Civil War.

          "Thirty years later, he animatedly shared his feelings about the numerous times we were called n—-ers …" We? I thought you were raised by Confederate apologists. You're a Black person raised by Confederate apologists? Interesting.

          His words, “I’m so glad you got out too.” Got out of what? High school?

          "Twisting the will to master a craft and buy limited freedom (it could be and was sometimes revoked/stolen) for yourself or others into some kind of benevolent gift from slavery is sickening."

          Where did anybody claim this was a benevolent gift from slavery? It's just a fact. Something that happened. Like the fact that, "12 percent of all free black heads of families in Virginia in 1830 owned slaves."

          Either you teach the facts or you don't.

          "Maybe because he knows the full story of white men systematically attacking/murdering/stealing from uppity black people who had the audacity to be successful and proud of it."

          Another fact. The Tulsa Massacre (among other atrocities) happened. That should be taught too.

          "Now white men are trying to steal our truths, our actual lived experiences, and bury them instead."

          Psycho-babble. Nobody is stealing anything.

          "You can do better than to hang your argument on the 19th century equivalent of uncle Clarence Thomas."

          So, a modern, successful Black man who disagrees with you is an Uncle Tom? Because he's Black and thinks for himself?

          And you claim others are racist?

          1. Not Today Avatar
            Not Today

            I went to high school with racists and racist apologists, yes. The stars and bars were proudly flown while Dixie was played by neighboring high school bands. Maybe the 90s and 2000s are too far from your memory but those years are vivid in mine and reflect a regional history that kids should know.

            Every once in a while, the Silent Sam wannabes I went to school with attempt to welcome the handful of us who endured their abuse back for reunions. It never ends well.

            Were you raised by confederate apologists? Ancestors fighting for the Union has no bearing, none, on the willingness to rehabilitate the Confederacy or its primary cause. My contemporaries were raised by such people. It was common for my elementary sibling to be unwelcome in her “friends“ homes. At 6yo she was told why in explicit terms.

            White men are, systematically, trying to keep the truth about what public institutions and systems (and the adults who ran them) did to us/allowed to happen to us out of the history books. They’re refusing to call it what it was, systemic racism, gaslighting those of us who survived it and minimizing the impact of it. Those people who believed we were less than because we were black and deserved to have racist epithets hurled at us, opportunities withheld from us, and should be grateful for the privilege of living among them (as well as the bystanders who did nothing to make it stop), are very much alive and Youngkin-aligned.

            I love my family and all but the older folks did white folks no favors by politely turning the other cheek and letting them cling to their myths. They should have been brought into the light and stomped out as both Germany and South Africa did. No monuments to traitors. No soft-pedaling abuse that still goes on and is tolerated (see grown folks trying to justify kids wearing the name of a racist on their chests). No quarter.

            I expect old perps to cling tooth and nail to the lies their teachers told them. I expect better from people my own age. I clearly expect too much.

            DO BETTER.

          2. Not Today Avatar
            Not Today

            I went to high school with racists and racist apologists, yes. The stars and bars were proudly flown while Dixie was played by neighboring high school bands. Maybe the 90s and 2000s are too far from your memory but those years are vivid in mine and reflect a regional history that kids should know.

            Every once in a while, the Silent Sam wannabes I went to school with attempt to welcome the handful of us who endured their abuse back for reunions. It never ends well.

            Were you raised by confederate apologists? Ancestors fighting for the Union has no bearing, none, on the willingness to rehabilitate the Confederacy or its primary cause. My contemporaries were raised by such people. It was common for my elementary sibling to be unwelcome in her “friends“ homes. At 6yo she was told why in explicit terms.

            White men are, systematically, trying to keep the truth about what public institutions and systems (and the adults who ran them) did to us/allowed to happen to us out of the history books. They’re refusing to call it what it was, systemic racism, gaslighting those of us who survived it and minimizing the impact of it. Those people who believed we were less than because we were black and deserved to have racist epithets hurled at us, opportunities withheld from us, and should be grateful for the privilege of living among them (as well as the bystanders who did nothing to make it stop), are very much alive and Youngkin-aligned.

            I love my family and all but the older folks did white folks no favors by politely turning the other cheek and letting them cling to their myths. They should have been brought into the light and stomped out as both Germany and South Africa did. No monuments to traitors. No soft-pedaling abuse that still goes on and is tolerated (see grown folks trying to justify kids wearing the name of a racist on their chests). No quarter.

            I expect old perps to cling tooth and nail to the lies their teachers told them. I expect better from people my own age. I clearly expect too much.

            DO BETTER.

          3. Not Today Avatar
            Not Today

            I went to high school with racists and racist apologists, yes. The stars and bars were proudly flown while Dixie was played by neighboring high school bands. Maybe the 90s and 2000s are too far from your memory but those years are vivid in mine and reflect a regional history that kids should know.

            Every once in a while, the Silent Sam wannabes I went to school with attempt to welcome the handful of us who endured their abuse back for reunions. It never ends well.

            Were you raised by confederate apologists? Ancestors fighting for the Union has no bearing, none, on the willingness to rehabilitate the Confederacy or its primary cause. My contemporaries were raised by such people. It was common for my elementary sibling to be unwelcome in her “friends“ homes. At 6yo she was told why in explicit terms.

            White men are, systematically, trying to keep the truth about what public institutions and systems (and the adults who ran them) did to us/allowed to happen to us out of the history books. They’re refusing to call it what it was, systemic racism, gaslighting those of us who survived it and minimizing the impact of it. Those people who believed we were less than because we were black and deserved to have racist epithets hurled at us, opportunities withheld from us, and should be grateful for the privilege of living among them (as well as the bystanders who did nothing to make it stop), are very much alive and Youngkin-aligned.

            I love my family and all but the older folks did white folks no favors by politely turning the other cheek and letting them cling to their myths. They should have been brought into the light and stomped out as both Germany and South Africa did. No monuments to traitors. No soft-pedaling abuse that still goes on and is tolerated (see grown folks trying to justify kids wearing the name of a racist traitor on their chests). No quarter.

            I expect old perps to cling tooth and nail to the lies their teachers told them. I expect better from people my own age. I clearly expect too much.

            DO BETTER.

          4. LarrytheG Avatar
            LarrytheG

            re: " White men are, systematically, trying to keep the truth about what public institutions and systems (and the adults who ran them) did to us/allowed to happen to us out of the history books."

            That's what it feels like to me also.

            It feels like anything that happened after slavery and for how long and whether it had any generational impact is not something they want to have in the history books because in their "view" it's not entirely factual and in dispute.

            To which one might say: " Okay, so how about references to the content – like we'd see in a resource like Wiki or Encyclopedia Virginia?"

            So, the entire exercise of curating the "history" in books is pretty outmoded these days since the internet has come along. And when the content is curated in a way that it's obviously different from commonly and easily available references material, the motives for the curation become an issue in and of themselves.

            THe fact that the process itself was not made transparent without a FOIA is not a good thing either in my view.

          5. Not Today Avatar
            Not Today

            A lot of the systemic issues are still present, see Southlake and Carrol ISD in TX among others. Systemic violations of student civil rights are still being found/substantiated. History didn’t stop when Bacon’s internal recorder ran out of tape. There are contemporaneous news reports of issues and incidents as well as living victims. As kids, we just wanted to leave, of course, that was the racists intent. I don’t blame those present for wanting to forget what was done by them, in their presence, or without their intervention. It was and is shameful. I blame them for pushing the lie that it never happened. Youngkin is using the power of the state, its institutions, to deny/hide the lived experiences and documented history of black people.

          6. Not Today Avatar
            Not Today

            A lot of the systemic issues are still present, see Southlake and Carrol ISD in TX among others. Systemic violations of student civil rights are still being found/substantiated. History didn’t stop when Bacon’s internal recorder ran out of tape. There are contemporaneous news reports of issues and incidents as well as living victims. As kids, we just wanted to leave. Of course, that was the racists intent. I don’t blame those present for the abuse from wanting to forget what was done by them, in their presence, and/or absent their intervention. It was and is shameful. I blame them for pushing the lie that it never happened. People know it happened even if they didn’t see it. It rings true because it is true. Youngkin is using the power of the state, its institutions (the very definition of institutionalized racism), to deny/hide the lived experiences and documented history of racism toward black people.

    3. Marty Chapman Avatar
      Marty Chapman

      Dick, I am waiting for you to announce you have sold all your worldly goods and donated the proceeds to BLM. Clearly all you possess is ill gotten as the result of a lifetime of privilege. Until you make said announcement, I would invite you to tone it down a bit.

  8. Nancy Naive Avatar
    Nancy Naive

    Don’t articles like this usually begin, “I’m no racist Southern Apologist, but…”?

    Yes, Virginia , there is white privilege…

  9. Not Today Avatar
    Not Today

    Where is the hew and cry supporting parents rights when this is action is antithetical to the rights of parents of whose children voluntarily sign up to take this class? Where is the hew and cry to protect these students from old white male censorship? We have young black kids taking school board members to the woodshed in Shenandoah for being forced to wear the name of a racist on their chests for PE. Where is the hew and cry behind denying students the freedom to learn the truth about the old folks institutions, personal behaviors, policies and practices and the lasting impacts today? Parental rights for thee and not for me? Good luck with this. Spanberger will redo the whole thing. Once again, hit dogs holler when racism appears before their eyes, in its correct historical context.

    That the legacy of redlining is past is about as intellectually honest a supposition as Trump’s ‘I won’ claims. No one with any academic or journalistic integrity claims the legacy of redlining is past. Read: The Color of Law.

  10. Not Today Avatar
    Not Today

    Where is the hew and cry supporting parents rights when this is action is antithetical to the rights of parents of whose children voluntarily sign up to take this class? Where is the hew and cry to protect these students from old white male censorship? We have young black kids taking school board members to the woodshed in Shenandoah for being forced to wear the name of a racist on their chests for PE. Where is the hew and cry behind denying students the freedom to learn the truth about the old folks institutions, personal behaviors, policies and practices and the lasting impacts today? Parental rights for thee and not for me? Good luck with this. Spanberger will redo the whole thing. Once again, hit dogs holler when racism appears before their eyes, in its correct historical context.

    That the legacy of redlining is past is about as intellectually honest a supposition as Trump’s ‘I won’ claims. No one with any academic or journalistic integrity claims the legacy of redlining is past. Read: The Color of Law.

  11. Not Today Avatar
    Not Today

    Where is the hew and cry supporting parents rights when this is action is antithetical to the rights of parents of whose children voluntarily sign up to take this class? Where is the hew and cry to protect these students from old white male censorship? We have young black kids taking school board members to the woodshed in Shenandoah for being forced to wear the name of a racist on their chests for PE. Where is the hew and cry behind denying students the freedom to learn the truth about the old folks institutions, personal behaviors, policies and practices and the lasting impacts today? Parental rights for thee and not for me? Good luck with this. Spanberger will redo the whole thing. Once again, hit dogs holler when racism appears before their eyes, in its correct historical context.

    That the legacy of redlining is past is about as intellectually honest a supposition as Trump’s ‘I won’ claims. No one with any academic or journalistic integrity claims the legacy of redlining is past. Read: The Color of Law.

  12. Not Today Avatar
    Not Today

    Where is the hew and cry supporting parents rights when this is action is antithetical to the rights of parents of whose children voluntarily sign up to take this class? Where is the hew and cry to protect these students from old white male censorship? We have young black kids taking school board members to the woodshed in Shenandoah for being forced to wear the name of a racist on their chests for PE. Where is the hew and cry behind denying students the freedom to learn the truth about the old folks institutions, personal behaviors, policies and practices and the lasting impacts today? Parental rights for thee and not for me? Good luck with this. Spanberger will redo the whole thing. Once again, hit dogs holler when racism appears before their eyes, in its correct historical context.

    That the legacy of redlining is past is about as intellectually honest a supposition as Trump’s ‘I won’ claims. No one with any academic or journalistic integrity claims the legacy of redlining is past. Read: The Color of Law.

  13. Eric the half a troll Avatar
    Eric the half a troll

    “The Northam-era formulation presupposes that colonial-era governments used slavery as a “mechanism for enforcement” of racism. In other words, racism came first, then slavery arose as a mechanism to enforce it.”

    Slavery and other institutions in America were indeed used to enforce racism. They were known as Jim Crow Laws after all… not Jim Crow Ideas. This description actually does not imply which came first historically, racism or slavery… but is that really the hair you want to split so you can justify screaming “DEI ALERT!!”…?

    1. Nancy Naive Avatar
      Nancy Naive

      and the trust fund babies say, “didn’t earn it.”

  14. Eric the half a troll Avatar
    Eric the half a troll

    “It conveys an understanding that White racism is an ineradicable trait, and it presupposes that social structures in 2024 are systemically racist as well.”

    It does no such thing. You are making things up here to provide cover for Youngkin and what Black WWII vets faced upon their return to the US South was far more than “discriminatory practices”. Google Joe Nathan Roberts and Isaiah Nixon for two examples.

  15. Not Today Avatar
    Not Today

    Where is the hew and cry supporting parents rights when this subversive whitewashing effort is antithetical to the rights of parents of whose children voluntarily sign up to take this class? Where is the hew and cry to protect these students from old white male censorship? We have young black kids taking school board members to the woodshed in Shenandoah for being forced to wear the name of a racist Confederate on their chests for PE while the confederate sympathizers huff with false pride. The proponents of such ought to be ashamed but they’re utterly shameless.

    I was excited to have my history buff kid take the AP version until Youngkin scuttled it. After that it was clear Gov sweater vest’s acolytes would attack the version for regular kids too; heaven forbid they have access to anything resembling facts. Pro tip, precious white kids were never lining up for this elective class thus being spared any knowledge of divisive words like…RACISM.

    Where is the hew and cry behind denying students the freedom to learn the truth about the racist old folks behind VA institutions, personal behaviors, policies and practices and the lasting impacts today? Parental rights for thee and not for me? Oh wait, y’all don’t even have kids in VA public schools so grandparent rights over…parents?? Good luck with this. Spanberger will wash that man right out of VA’s hair in a couple years. Once again, hit dogs holler when racism appears before their eyes, even in its correct historical context. This whole shtick is pathetic and blatantly wrong. Sad.

    That the legacy of redlining is past is about as intellectually honest a supposition as Trump’s ‘I won’ claims tho. The author should know better. No one with any historian bona fides, academic or claim on objective journalistic integrity, holds that the legacy of redlining is past. This isn’t objective journalism tho, it’s opinion and entertainment. Read: The Color of Law.

  16. Clarity77 Avatar
    Clarity77

    Of course the revisionist formulation came at the behest of Northam, a self confessed scion of a line of white supremacists going back to his family line as plantation owners who in this action seek to keep blacks on the plantation by manipulating the truth. The truth is the democrat party from its origins before the Civil War when they, not Republicans were the only slave holders. Even unto today as they are desperate as they watch blacks waking up and getting off the plantation.
    A final thought, as it has been noted repeatedly, just listen to what leftists accuse the right of doing and you can easily see and confirm who and what they actually are. Sick in the head struggling under the weight of their guilt. And guilt is what it all comes down to. Again, sick.

    1. Not Today Avatar
      Not Today

      Black PEOPLE. Blacks is not a thing unless you’re referring to a rugby team? I don’t live, nor have I ever, on a plantation. Does that make you angry?

    2. Not Today Avatar
      Not Today

      Black PEOPLE. Blacks is not a thing unless you’re referring to a rugby team? I don’t live, nor have I ever, on a plantation. Does that make you angry?

    3. Not Today Avatar
      Not Today

      Black PEOPLE. Blacks is not a thing unless you’re referring to a rugby team? I don’t live, nor have I ever, on a plantation. Does that make you angry? Being unable to dehumanize people in the flesh instead of mere language?

      1. Nancy Naive Avatar
        Nancy Naive

        Technically, the All Blacks. Football w/o helmets. Clearly a Republican endeavor.

        You can get married on a plantation… so idyllic. I suppose Oświęcim would have a venue too.

      2. Nancy Naive Avatar
        Nancy Naive

        Technically, the All Blacks. Football w/o helmets. Clearly a Republican endeavor.

        You can get married on a plantation… so idyllic. I suppose Oświęcim would have a venue too.

  17. Yep, just like redlining, all discrimination against Blacks is in the past.

    What's next? Put the UDC in charge of writing the American History curriculum?

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