Fear and Loathing in the People’s Republic

Charlottesville students protested gun violence in a walkout last year. Photo credit: Daily Progress

The City of Charlottesville is closing all of its public schools today after alleged threats of racial violence surfaced online. Authorities did not say what the threats were, but the Washington Post reported images circulating on social media sites referring to a post on 4chan, an anonymous online messaging board, that “included a racist meme, used slurs for blacks and Latinos, and threatened to attack students of color at Charlottesville High.”

I’ll lay five-to-one odds that the threats are a hoax. The incident has many of the earmarks of racial hoaxes described in the book, “Hate Crime Hoax,” by Wilfred Reilly, an African-American professor at Kentucky State University.

One tip-off is that hate crimes reported on college campuses are almost always hoaxes. In this case, we’re talking about a college town, not a college campus. But we’re talking about an extremely “progressive” town where racial sensitivities remain acute a year and a half after the infamous United the Right rally. The white supremacists, almost none of whom were actually from Charlottesville, have long since dispersed, but memories remain vivid, citizens cultivate their sense of victimhood — a link from the Washington Post article reads, “A year later, Charlottesville remains a wounded city” — and students are radicalized politically.

The response has followed a pattern seen all over the country in which alleged hate incidents are used to call attention to systemic racism. Writes the Post:

This week’s online episode did not surprise members of Charlottesville High’s Black Student Union, who say it is symptomatic of persistent issues in Charlottesville City Schools, including excessive police presence in schools and a lack of black students in advanced classes.

“We’re still allowing this kind of racism in our school,” said Althea Laughon-Worrell, an 18 year-old who attends Charlottesville High School. “It’s making it seem like it’s okay for whoever posted that to say that, to feel that way. . . . It is because of racism, and because we haven’t dealt with this, that this person decided to post this.”

Zyahna Bryant, president of the Black Student Union, has called on the community to reckon with white supremacy in the aftermath of the 2017 rally and confront gentrification and the paucity of affordable housing in the city.

Bryant, 18, wants the latest episode to encourage community members to grapple with racial inequities in the school system.

“There needs to be a real conversation about how students of color are being supported,” Bryant said. “It is dangerous to continue to categorize racism as just person-to-person experiences without calling attention to the systems that work to uphold and enforce racist policies.”

Charlottesville schools a cesspool of racism? Really? Charlottesville schools are arguably the most politically “progressive” in the commonwealth of Virginia. The Post quotes a number of hand-wringers, all decrying hate and racism.

 Rosa Atkins, school superintendent, weighed in with this quote:

We would like to acknowledge and condemn the fact that this threat was racially charged. We do not tolerate hate or racism. … The entire staff and School Board stand in solidarity with our students of color — and with people who have been singled out for reasons such as religion or ethnicity of sexual identity in other vile threats made across the country or around the world. We are in this together, and a threat against one is a threat against all.

Nowhere in either the Washington Post or Daily Progress accounts of the incident does anyone even consider the possibility that the incident might be a hoax.

Reilly, who has compiled a database of hate crime incidents, estimates that between 15% and 50% of all so-called hate crimes are hoaxes. Some are idiosyncratic in nature, but most are ginned up by leftist activists with a point to make. As one wag said, the demand for hate crimes far exceeds the actual supply, so leftists seeking confirmation of their world view have to invent them.

My suspicions may be misguided. According to the Daily Progress, police have yet to identify the poster. Indeed, they have not determined if the individual was an adult, student or someone who lives in Charlottesville, But hoaxes are so widespread that everyone needs to chill out and await the results of the Charlottesville police investigation before jumping to conclusions. 

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10 responses to “Fear and Loathing in the People’s Republic

  1. we just don’t have school mass shootings.. it’s all a hoax… right?

  2. It probably is a hoax but what should the school do? Even if there is a .01% chance that the threat is real they have to take action.

  3. It’s the “thinking” behind this statement that boggles me:

    ” Nowhere in either the Washington Post or Daily Progress accounts of the incident does anyone even consider the possibility that the incident might be a hoax.

    Reilly, who has compiled a database of hate crime incidents, estimates that between 15% and 50% of all so-called hate crimes are hoaxes. Some are idiosyncratic in nature, but most are ginned up by leftist activists with a point to make. As one wag said, the demand for hate crimes far exceeds the actual supply, so leftists seeking confirmation of their world view have to invent them.”

    Is this the norm for “Conservative thought” these days? LORD!

    So we have, on a consistent and continuing basis across the country – real school shootings and yet when there are “threats” – they’re usually “hoaxes” born of Liberals “world view”?

    Come on Jim.. GEEZE guy!

  4. Want to make a bet? I win the bet if the incident is proven to be a hoax. You win the bet if it’s proven to be a real threat. No one wins if the police can’t make a determination. How about it?

  5. Yes, there are many real school shootings in the U.S. But the perpetrators are almost always severely alienated and/or mentally ill white students. Not white supremacists. The Charlottesville incident has the earmarks of someone trying to dramatize the problem of racism by concocting a hoax. If I’m wrong, I’ll admit it. The point of my post was to say, let’s wait and find out before jumping to conclusions and freaking out.

    It sounds like you have no problem with jumping to conclusions. Indeed, it sounds like you are offended that there might be any other interpretation than the one that confirms the Oppression Narrative.

    • If the prankster is white, C’ville will be delighted. If he or she is not white, C’ville will go silent, suppress the truth, if not hide it altogether. Hysteria loves more Hysteria. The Rules for Radicals of Saul Alinsky hang thick in C’ville’s air, driving the place.

      “Power is not only what you have but what the enemy thinks you have.”
      “Never go outside the expertise of your people.”
      “Whenever possible go outside the expertise of the enemy.”
      “Make the enemy live up to its own book of rules.”
      “Ridicule is man’s most potent weapon.”
      “A good tactic is one your people enjoy.”
      “A tactic that drags on too long becomes a drag.”
      “Keep the pressure on.”
      “The threat is usually more terrifying than the thing itself.”
      “The major premise for tactics is the development of operations that will maintain a constant pressure upon the opposition.”
      “If you push a negative hard and deep enough it will break through into its counterside.”
      “The price of a successful attack is a constructive alternative.”
      “Pick the target, freeze it, personalize it, and polarize it.”

      Saul the leftist is C’ville;s and UVA’s favorite “intellectual” now.

    • I think that there ARE school shootings and it’s dumb to say that because SOME of them are hoaxes that responding to them is somehow wrong.

      Speculation about the MOTIVES of the shooters – as if it matters what they are – or not – what does that actually mean?

      If people guess wrong at the motives or they wrongly attribute them – then we label those things as hoaxes that presumably means that they do not actually result in real shootings?

      I’m having a little trouble understand your point.

      Are you upset that we actually do have shootings but we attributed them to motives other than actual?

      That basically, all the shooting we actually ARE seeing are NOT because of race?

      And it’s wrong to attribute “threats” of a racial nature because most that actually happen are not due to “race”?

      Have I got that right? Correct me if I got it wrong.

  6. Here is your your typical leftist female academic lecturing you on your acceptable and unacceptable behavior around her.

    “Do not dare to comment on my body. Do not stare. Do not tell me all the things you want to do to me. Do not force me to bear the weight of your assumptions. Do not waste both of our time with things so hollow as this. Do not make wishes on my freckles. Do not touch my waist. Do not tell me I am precious, or pretty. Do not seek to make me smaller. Do not ask me to fit.

    Instead, tell me a story. Tell me a secret. Tell me where you come from. Are you a communist? A socialist? Where is your activist home? Have you found the place that makes you want to swallow its rhetoric whole?” See:
    https://quillette.com/2017/05/06/found-place-makes-want-swallow-rhetoric-whole/

    Now weaponize this attitude with the tactics outlined in The Rules for Radicals of Saul Alinsky, and you have Charlottesville Virginia today, thanks in great measure to remnants of former President Teresa Sullivan, and the UVA she reconstructed from the ground up.

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