Educational Equity in Virginia Beach Public Schools

George Orwell

by James C. Sherlock

I publish below the Educational Equity Policy to be voted on by the Virginia Beach School Board at a 4 p.m. meeting today.

My overarching comment is that the policy, as written in draft, defines equity to include both equality of opportunity and equality of outcomes. Teachers are specifically charged to ensure equality of outcomes.

The former is exactly what must happen, the latter demands quotas. It demands equity by sex as well as race and a lengthy list of other human characteristics. One wonders how much attention will be given to the outperformance by girls over boys in standardized tests.

The parenthetical notes below are mine.

The Equity Policy to be voted on tonight states that:

Strict equality of opportunity and resources between students may not result in educational equity.”  …

Equity gaps means the disparity in a metric in achievement, opportunity, or treatment that can be reasonably be correlated to racial or social inequity practice.” (Reasonably?) (The metrics of achievement include primarily SOLs and SATs. Online teaching will render those questionable for years. ) 

“The Superintendent is authorized to employ personnel or retain outside services to assist in the assessment, review and ongoing implementation of educational equity practices.” (A quick check of organizations offering “assessment, review and ongoing implementation of educational equity practices” reveals a choice among Marxist critical race theorists.)

“The Superintendent, through the Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, shall be responsible for implementation and evaluation of School Division strategies for implementation.” (Virginia Beach Schools have a “Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.”)

“The School Board will commit to the following – :

“1. Supporting the Superintendent in identifying processes and practices that cause or contribute to inequitable outcomes.” …

“6.  “Requiring mandatory training for all School Board Members and staff regarding: implicit bias and how it produces inequitable practices and outcomes;” (Unequal outcomes reveal implicit bias.) 

   7. “Supporting a culturally responsive curriculum and assessments for all students”. (Grading quotas.) 

   8. “Increasing equity, diversity, and inclusion in the School Division by addressing identified practices, where they may exist, that contribute to discrepancies in recruitment, hiring, and retention practices.” (Hiring and retention quotas.)

   9. “Requiring that administrator and teacher personnel evaluation systems incorporate culturally responsive teaching practices.” (Failure of a teacher’s students to achieve equal outcomes is a career ender.)

“All curriculum materials shall be examined for bias by the Department of Teaching and Learning. Where materials reflect bias, teachers utilizing the materials will acknowledge and seek to understand the bias and communicate this important context to students and parents/legal guardians prior to instruction.”  (Orwellian.)

“To address disparities in course participation (i.e. academies and AP/honors participation), middle and high schools will offer opportunities for supplementary coursework”… (No word on what happens if Asian and white students disproportionately register for these opportunities.)

The entire draft Educational Equity policy is presented below.  I will report tomorrow on the vote on it in tonight’s School Board meeting.

School Board of the City of Virginia Beach Policy 2-4

Educational Equity

A. Purpose

The School Board values the diversity in our community and staff. The School Board believes that all students, staff, and community members, regardless of backgrounds, deserve a rigorous and respectful learning and work environment where diversity is valued and used toward achieving positive academic and social outcomes. The School Board and the School Division are committed to developing a capacity for cultural competence and a commitment to equity and inclusion to enable the fulfillment of its core values and life-long learning competencies. This Policy defines expectations for consideration of racial and social equity, including meaningful stakeholder involvement in planning, developing, and implementing policies, practices and initiatives as well as review by the School Board of the School Division’s efforts to address issues of educational equity. It provides a framework to advance educational equity in alignment with the School Board and the School Division’s visions and priorities.

B. Generally accepted beliefs

1. The School Board acknowledges that complex societal and historical factors have contributed to educational inequities within the School Division.

2. The School Board will to be intentional in its efforts to replace factors that may lead to inequities, including racism, discrimination, harassment and prejudice with attitudes and behaviors that reflect acceptance, belonging, compassion, integrity, understanding, fairness, cooperation and respect.

3. The School Board understands that the concept of educational equity is not the same as equality. Equity refers to fostering a barrier-free environment whereby by all students, regardless of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation/gender identity, pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, age, marital status, disability, or genetic information, have the opportunity to benefit from the establishment of high standards and the provision of access, support, effective and inclusive learning environments and resources required for a high-quality education. Strict equality of opportunity and resources between students may not result in educational equity.

Therefore, review and deliberative decision making regarding equitable practices and allocation of resources may be needed to achieve the School Board’s and the School Division’s goals for educational equity.

4. Race means a socially constructed category of identification based on physical characteristics, ancestry, historical affiliation, or shared culture.

5. Racial equity means the absence of institutional and structural barriers experienced by people based on race or colors, that have impeded access opportunities, and results.

6. Social equity means the absence of institutional and structural barriers experienced by people that impede opportunities and results based on other societal factors such as: age; sex; sexual orientation; gender identity; religion; national origin; ethnicity; marital status; pregnancy, childbirth and related medical conditions; disability; socio-economic status; neighborhood of residence; and other related factors.

7. Equity gaps means the disparity in a metric in achievement, opportunity, or treatment that can be reasonably be correlated to racial or social inequity practice.

C. Educational Equity Assessment, Plan for Equity Priorities and Practices, and Review

The School Board and the School Division will assess the educational equity issues of the School Division and then create an Equity Plan to identify priorities, correct and address the inequities, and review and monitor such efforts.

1. The School Board directs the Superintendent to assess and identify inequitable practices and procedures within the School Division that have historically or are currently resulting in inequities of opportunity for students and staff.

2. The Superintendent is authorized to employ personnel or retain outside services to assist in the assessment, review and ongoing implementation of educational equity practices.

3. The Superintendent or designee(s) will report such assessments as well as recommended changes to practices, procedures, policies and/or regulations to the School Board. The written report shall also be made available to the public and the School Division’s Equity Council.

4. The Superintendent and the School Board may begin incorporating changes based on assessments and review prior to such reports.

5. The Superintendent and the School Board will determine the goals and priorities for the School Division’s equity programs and practices and how the Superintendent or designees will report assessment efforts to the School Board. The Superintendent or designee(s) will then create an Equity Plan for the School Division.

6. The School Board shall no less than annually review data from the Superintendent or designee(s) regarding the goals and priorities of the School Division’s Equity Plan.

7. The Equity Plan reports and data provided to the School Board will include but not be limited to equity gaps in: student achievement; identification and enrollment in gifted education; enrollment in academies and advanced courses; student discipline rates; graduation rates; and alternative program enrollment. The reports shall also include evidence of growth in each identified equity gap.

8. The Superintendent, through the Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, shall be responsible for implementation and evaluation of School Division strategies for implementation.

9. Adequate resources, both human and financial, shall be reasonably allocated to achieve these goals.
D. School Board commitments
The School Board will commit to the following:

1. Supporting the Superintendent in identifying processes and practices that cause or contribute to inequitable outcomes.

2. Respecting and championing the diversity and life experiences of all community members to support the School Division’s core values and strategic goals.

3. Adopting processes, practices, and initiatives to ensure an equitable school community inclusive of diversity, race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation/gender identity, pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, age, marital status, disability, or genetic information.

4. Identifying and acknowledging where lack of access and opportunity may exist in the School Division and may have compounded educational inequities.

5. Supporting development of processes, practices, and initiatives that will foster equity of opportunity and equity of access to programs, services, and resources.

6. Requiring mandatory training for all School Board Members and staff regarding: implicit bias and how it produces inequitable practices and outcomes; cultural awareness and culturally responsive teaching and educational practices; improve culturally responsive practices in order to serve the School Division’s diverse students and communities.

7. Supporting a culturally responsive curriculum and assessments for all students.

8. Increasing equity, diversity, and inclusion in the School Division by addressing identified practices, where they may exist, that contribute to discrepancies in recruitment, hiring, and retention practices.

9. Requiring that administrator and teacher personnel evaluation systems incorporate culturally responsive teaching practices.

E. Equity Policy Communication

The Superintendent or designee(s) is directed to ensure that this Equity Policy is communicated to students, staff, and the community as set forth below.

1. Each school shall post the following public statement:

“Virginia Beach City Public Schools is committed to establishing and sustaining an equitable community that exemplifies the School Division’s core values and equity mission to end the predictive value of race, ethnicity, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation/gender identity, pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, age, marital status, disability and to ensure each member of the school community’s success. The School Board and the School Division reject all forms of unlawful discrimination and harassment as destructive to their core values and strategic goals.”

The School Division will post this statement on the School Division website and social media sites.

3. This Policy shall be available to families and translated into other languages to ensure accessibility.

4. The School Division shall ensure that the public is aware of this Policy and the means for students, families, and staff to report inequities and other forms of alleged discrimination and harassment.
F. Curriculum and Instruction

The Superintendent or designee(s) will ensure that curriculum and instructional materials reflect the School Board’s commitment to educational equity.

1. Curriculum and instructional materials for all grades shall reflect diversity and include a range of perspectives and experiences, particularly those of historically underrepresented groups.

2. All curriculum materials shall be examined for bias by the Department of Teaching and Learning. Where materials reflect bias, teachers utilizing the materials will acknowledge and seek to understand the bias and communicate this important context to students and parents/legal guardians prior to instruction.

3. The School Division shall develop, support, and implement curriculum and instruction as well as educational resources that have been reviewed and determined not to promote bias.

4. Class instructional activities and extracurricular programs shall be designed to provide opportunities for cross-cultural and cross-racial interactions that foster respect for diversity. The School Board supports interschool activities that will allow students to experience the diversity within their schools and the School Division.

5. To address disparities in course participation (i.e. academies and AP/honors participation), middle and high schools will offer opportunities for supplementary coursework, such as summer bridge programs, study skills, or tutoring during or after school, to students interested in moving to higher level courses. This information will be made available to students and families through school counselors, school bulletins and webpages.

G. Policy Enforcement

The School Board directs the Superintendent or designee(s) to enforce this Policy and create regulations and practices to implement this Policy. The School Board will annually review School Division’s implementation of this Policy and take appropriate action to ensure compliance with and enforcement of this Policy.

Adopted by the School Board: 2020

There are currently no comments highlighted.

87 responses to “Educational Equity in Virginia Beach Public Schools

  1. “To address disparities in course participation (i.e. academies and AP/honors participation), middle and high schools will offer opportunities for supplementary coursework”… (No word on what happens if Asian and white students disproportionately register for these opportunities)

    Quick guess–they won’t be allowed open enrollment. They’ll be put at the end of the line for available space.

    So many questions to be asked. One is who defines “culturally responsive”? Is it one size/culture fits all?
    7. Supporting a culturally responsive curriculum and assessments for all students.

    Thank you for sharing this with us.

  2. These policies will be the end of quality public education in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Expect private and charter alternatives to boom. Those alternatives will be the next target of today’s social justice racists, and their identity politics.

  3. man… all these bullet points…

  4. Word salad.

  5. Well… this might be distilled down to a simple concept – “you’re gonna get your piece of the demographic pie! “

  6. James Wyatt Whitehead V

    Well I hope the current school board in VA Beach enjoys the term of service. They will be voted out next time around. Virtual learning will be the coffin and the equity policy will be the funeral.

  7. Pedagogic gibberish, most of it. What you cannot clearly understand you cannot follow or enforce. But it sure reads like it must be important. It won’t move the needle, not in ten years.

    • Baconator with extra cheese

      It’ll move the needle. If it is truly implemented the overachievers will be drug down to the level of the lowest denominator for “equity”. So the needle will move for those kids, thus making a crappy equal education.
      I wish I had the means to start a private academy… there will be money to be made. Maybe the religions can stay relevant in the modern society by opening schools.

      • Maybe. I think it is all Kabuki and behind the curtain, the kids who are serious about education will progress and the kids who are not will continue to founder. The disparities we see today are not due to what is going on or not going on in the schools, but back in the homes. There may indeed be a stronger migration toward the private schools, which are already far more common here in Richmond.

        • In front of the curtain, those disappointed that they do not achieve the equal outcomes promised by the new policy, including many of the activist speakers at last night’s meeting, will sue.

    • I agree it is gibberish, Steve. But I don’t believe it is harmless, and I am sure you underestimate the zeal of its adherents.

      A teacher can be held accountable for things they cannot control by a principal, who herself can be held accountable for whomever (and whatever) the “Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion” may prove to be in Virginia Beach. And as things go, if they can be, they will be, whether by parents, their attorneys, the ACLU or all three.

      • More and more my attitude is, you idiots voted these fools in and don’t come whining to me when it doesn’t work out. My wife got out of public education more than a decade ago. SOLs worked largely the same way, making the teacher accountable for things outside his or her control. Then there was No Child Left Behind from my side of the aisle. Yeah, right, that goal was met! If my kids turned out well (and three masters indicate they did) it was largely our doing, keeping their eyes on the ball. Pedagogy is just one fad after another, mostly worthless.

        Telling yet another generation of students and parents that their problems are the fault of outside forces is not going to lead to progress.

        • Baconator with extra cheese

          This has been my attitude as well. I am almost to the point of supporting the nuttiest candidate as a form of perverted nihilism. My responsibilitites are ending as a parent and I will not be a Virginia resident much longer…. Let the nuts rule the state right into oblivion…. I am longing for the days when I will laugh hysterically at the state of Richmond from a far.

      • It has to reach the point of being something for which they can be held accountable. This is administrative bs to occupy their time. It’s as Steve sai, “gibberish” and gibberish doesn’t produce. Nothing will come of it.

      • It is not harmless. Fairfax County adopted a similar educational equity policy. Almost immediately there was discussion of instituting school busing in the interests of equity. Town halls were held and the School Board Representatives met packed meeting places to insist that the rumors were just rumors. The assembled parents all but called the presenters liars. Frankly, they would have been tarred and feathered had the “still funded” Fairfax County police not been in attendance.

        Interestingly, the leftists who insist on educational equity see no issue with Asian-Americans excelling beyond all other racial groups with regard to educational outcome. Meanwhile, the attitude from the right seems to be … Asian American families take education more seriously than any other group so of course they excel. Interesting dichotomy.

        • The problem is that people pick neighborhoods by income class and school so they self segregate and the results of that are essentially segregated schools.

          Many Asians are well-educated immigrants are the offspring of them. They were never slaves, never discriminated against like black folks were.

          The impact of slavery is generational and we are still suffering from it. Compare blacks to Asians does not deal with the other realities – just the one that suggests that Asians are somehow “better” – not only blacks but whites.

          What does that solve in terms of the issues we are dealing with?

          Nothing. All it does is fog the issue.

          • “They were never slaves, never discriminated against like black folks were.”

            Asians were never discriminated against? Never indentured servants to the railroads and miners in the west? Never incarcerated without trial during WW II?

            And now you cite a “reality” – “Asians are somehow “better” – not only blacks but whites.”

            You need to rethink engaging on issues of race. You are in over your head.

          • Some were – but a lot of Asians in this country also immigrated here – already well educated and financially ok.

            But yes some asians long ago were, just as the Irish and Italians and other immigrants were decades ago.

            but most of them were not slaves nor were they subject to Jim Crow laws and separate but equal schools.

            It’s easy to cherry pick on these issues but the truth is – only the blacks were subjected to the width and breadth of slavery and bad treatment continued decades after they were “free”.

            SOME Asians long ago did get abused but since that time a lot of Asians have immigrated and our immigration polices favor immigrants who are well educated, financially secure and believe to be an asset not a liability.

          • Reed Fawell 3rd

            “They were never slaves, never discriminated against like black folks were.”

            Yes, this is compete and utter nonsense. Asians, along with American Indians, and most all other other peoples worldwide, invented slavery and practiced it on all peoples and individuals they could dominate, since the beginning of human history, and likely long before recorded history, especially in massive amounts in Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Western Hemisphere before arrival of the Europeans.

          • Keep digging Larry.

            “Some were – but a lot of Asians in this country also immigrated here – already well educated and financially ok.” A “lot” – and you know this how?

            This is about schools. One in four Asian heritage children in Virginia schools 2019 – 2020 were economically disadvantaged. Oops.

            The 1860 U.S. Census listed Asian residents for the first time. Almost all the 34,933 Asians in the country that the census counted were Chinese living in California; 90 percent of them were male.

            The vast majority of Asian immigrants to the United States came here between 1895 and 1929, with a peak of 300,000 between 1900 and 1909. Virtually all of them started work here as laborers, working railroads, mines and farms. In 1908, an informal agreement between Japan and the U.S. produced a flow of Japanese women to form families with the hugely disproportionate number on men. Between 1930 and 1950, Asian immigrants numbered about 25,000 per decade. Source: Department of Homeland Security, Yearbook of Immigration Statistics, 2008.

            In 2001, immigrants were 53% Hispanic and 22% Asian. The crossover point was 2009, when more Asians than Hispanics arrived. (Pew Research)

            By race and ethnicity, more Asian immigrants than Hispanic immigrants have arrived in the U.S. in most years since 2010. (Pew Research)

            Asians are projected to become the largest immigrant group in the U.S. by 2055, surpassing Hispanics. (Pew research).

            In case you missed it, Asia is a vast continent. Lots of different ethnicities, cultures and languages and about 4.3 billion people. So you and Nancy and your fellow travelers may want to ease up on the “some” Asians and “most” Asians and “a lot” of Asians analogies.

            Except to say that there are truly a lot of Asians.

          • Sherlock, can you provide the links to your claims?

            thanks…

          • You have a browser and I provided the sources.

          • No, I’ve looked and cannot find that data… so back up your claims, please.

            If I’m wrong, I will admit it… but you need to show the data.

            thanks.

          • Larry,

            Here’s one – RE: Asians are projected to become the largest immigrant group in the U.S. by 2055, surpassing Hispanics. (Pew research).:

            https://www.pewresearch.org/hispanic/2015/09/28/modern-immigration-wave-brings-59-million-to-u-s-driving-population-growth-and-change-through-2065/

            See, I DO know how to use Google…

          • The Pew Research data are hidden under the inscrutable heading “Key findings about U.S. immigrants”.

            The “Department of Homeland Security, Yearbook of Immigration Statistics, 2008.” is hidden under “Yearbook of Immigration Statistics 2008 – Homeland Security”

            The Virginia Schools data under VBOE – Statistics and Reports – Enrollment and Demographics – 2019 – 2020

            Your browser needs a new operator.

          • “…but most of them were not slaves nor were they subject to Jim Crow laws and separate but equal schools.”

            No, most of the early Asian immigrants were too busy being worked to death and cheated out of their wages while building the Transcontinental Railroad to worry about “separate but equal”.

            And then there was the AEL (Asiatic Exclusion League) and its various off-shoots.

          • The PEW ones I can find… no problem… it’s the data that I was not having any luck at.

            Perhpas you can find the data ones!

            😉

          • A LOT of immigrants were “worked to death”.

            Most of them were NOT racially discriminated against for decades like black folks were.

            why do you dispute the simple facts on this?

            No Asians were enslaved like the blacks were , members of their family sold off , others beaten with whips and lynched and even when freed subjected to Jim Crow laws and forced to use separate facilities and schools…

          • Larry,

            RE: “The 1860 U.S. Census listed Asian residents for the first time. Almost all the 34,933 Asians in the country that the census counted were Chinese living in California; 90 percent of them were male.”

            1860 Census Data – Population by State

            https://www.census.gov/library/publications/1864/dec/1860a.html

            If I can find this stuff it should be EASY for you since you are so obviously morally and mentally superior to me.

          • you’re doing GREAT! thank you!

            can you find this one?

            One in four Asian heritage children in Virginia schools 2019 – 2020 were economically disadvantaged.

            that’s the one I was having the most trouble with!

            ‘thank you !

            maybe here?

            /https://vakids.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Virginia.pdf

          • Larry,

            Try this. https://p1pe.doe.virginia.gov/apex/f?p=180:1:1918566075788:SHOW_REPORT::::

            From the tables I built I got 93,506 full-time Asian heritage students, with 22,588 of them classified as “disadvantaged”. It looks like Mr. SherlockJ right… …again.

          • Wayne, I got that far but wondered what the number for economically disadvantaged really was for.

            by the way – your link does not provide the data itself – you’d have to put that in a file then make it shareable and then provide that link.

            I found another source:

            https://vakids.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Virginia.pdf

            and what it shows is that Asians actually have far less economically disadvantaged than any of the other groups – only 17% and that includes other Pacific groups.

            Sherlocks point seems to be that Asians are also economically disadvantaged even if they did not have decades of discrimination and slavery… like the blacks did – and yet they do better on academics.. even better than Whites and Hispanics.

            I don’t think the data backs him up on this especially in places like Northern Virginia , Fairfax and Loudoun.

            Now – IF Sherlock COULD show that for the Asians that were actually economically disadvantaged – that they STILL did better than blacks and whites, and Hispanics.. I’d be forced to acknowledge that – and I would.

            But I think we’re off on a false narrative overall…

            If any kid – no matter their color or ethnicity – has parents who are poorly educated themselves – and as a result have a low income job – would anyone really expect them to be able to “help” their kids the same as a college-educated parents earning a high income could?

          • From the VDOE demographic build-a-table data dictionary:

            “Economically Disadvantaged A flag that identifies students as economically disadvantaged if they meet any one of the following: 1) is eligible for Free/Reduced Meals, or
            2) receives TANF, or
            3) is eligible for Medicaid, or
            4) identified as either Migrant or experiencing Homelessness.”

            Always consult the data dictionary for any data you use.

          • Jim – yep I understand the term.

            Can you tell me for each demographic – whites, blacks, hipsanics and asians what the percent of each is economically disadvantaged?

            I got this:

            White 24%
            Black 54%
            Hispanic 48%
            two or more races 31%
            Asians and Pacific Islander – 17%

            https://vakids.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Virginia.pdf

          • “by the way – your link does not provide the data itself – you’d have to put that in a file then make it shareable and then provide that link.”

            Wow! Talk about nit-picking. I provided a source of the data you requested and you moved the goalposts – again. You are simply unbelievable.

            You asked for the source of the data – if you wanted the data spoon-fed to you then right up front you should have said: “Please spoon-feed the data you are referencing”.

          • As far as I know, you cannot get enrollment data and demographic percentages from VDOE build-a-table.

            If you know how and share I’d certainly be appreciative:

            I did find this:

            White 24%
            Black 54%
            Hispanic 48%
            two or more races 31%
            Asians and Pacific Islander – 17%

            https://vakids.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Virginia.pdf

            this is for all of Virginia and it indicates that Asians actually have the lowest number of disadvantaged – half what blacks have.

            I don’t know of a quick way to find that kind of data for individual school districts.

            The School Quality profiles will show datasets for demographics and datasets for disadvantaged or not, I’m not sure I know how to drill down to just the Asian disadvantaged versus not – for say Fairfax schools..

          • “As far as I know, you cannot get enrollment data and demographic percentages from VDOE build-a-table.”

            The whole purpose of the table is to provide enrollment data. From the header at the web page:” The Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) annually collects statistics on the number of students enrolled in public school…” What did you think the numbers it returns to you are?

            As far as “percentages”, it’s simple math:

            # [students in chosen category who meet chosen criteria] / #[total students in chosen category] * 100 = % [students in chosen category who meet chosen criteria].

            Thus, for disadvantaged Asian students:

            22,588 [Asian student who qualify as disadvantaged] / 93,506 [Asian Students] * 100 = 24.16% [Asian students who qualify as disadvantaged. That’s pretty darned close to 1 in 4.

          • Sorry, I am unable to duplicate your results.

            I did find “Select Statistics to Display on the Report”

            and Total Count was a choice – that is available but does not come up in default mode – default mode (at least for me) brings up assessment data and the reports I’ve seen are actually titled “assessment statistics” – as opposed to “enrollment”.

            The best I was able to do was bring up numbers for each SOL subject – had to run the tool twice – once for disadvantaged and once for not – then add up the numbers to get totals.

            Go back to my original comment – which said that Asians were not treated the same way as blacks for decades… and that many Asians immigrated here who were well educated and financially okay.

            Yes.. there were early immigrants who were abused – but not to the same width and depth of black folks.

            Sherlock sought to disprove that by looking at current day Asians who were disadvantaged so as to claim that because there are some – it proves they are all not well off.

            Remember I was saying COMPARED to blacks.

            So – I showed that comparative data from another source that shows that of all races in Virginia – Asians have the least percent of economically disadvantaged – actually 1/3 of blacks.

            This actually proves the original point – that blacks are much worse off today AND suffered much more bad treatment for decades.

            I think you and Sherlock are not really interested in the facts to start with to be honest – that’s not what you are really commenting about – and if you keep on – I’m done with you.

          • “I am unable to duplicate your results.” Larry, you are simply not very good at statistics, and build-a-table clearly escapes you.

            Perhaps best to accept government statistics from those who know how to set the terms of a search and then download and assess the data mathematically, such as doing simple division to come up with percentages.

            You have never found me (or any other published author on this site as far as I know) to provide an inaccurate statistic, or a statistic from other than trustworthy sources, nearly always government data, and never will. So why not just move on with the data provided.

            As far as being “done” with people like Wayne and I, who have endlessly and fruitlessly tried to educate you on the basics of statistics, I really hope you follow through.

          • Jim – this had little to do with statistics.

            I provided data to you and you have not commented on it:

            I did find this:

            White 24%
            Black 54%
            Hispanic 48%
            two or more races 31%
            Asians and Pacific Islander – 17%

            https://vakids.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Virginia.pdf

            this is for all of Virginia and it indicates that Asians actually have the lowest number of disadvantaged – half what blacks have.

            and that was my original point – that Asians tend to be better off economically because they did not suffer the width and depth of discrimination that blacks did in this country.

            Also – don’t confuse statistics with personal attacks..
            which is what Wayne was doing – and while I will put up
            with some of it not much.

            So, if you really want me to stop commenting on your stuff – and sometimes I think you do – just copy Wayne’s behavior and you’ll be “free”. 😉

          • Apples and oranges. This post was about children in the public schools. Thus it used data from the public schools. VDOE data identifies students as “economically disadvantaged if they meet any one of the following:
            1) is eligible for Free/Reduced Meals; or
            2) receives TANF; or
            3) is eligible for Medicaid; or
            4) identified as either Migrant or experiencing Homelessness.”

            The vakids.org data is for all children in the state, not just those in the public schools. Its definition of economically disadvantaged is children living below 200% of poverty level.

            Those very significant differences in both the population assessed and data definitions produce the differences in statistical results.

            That is why an author needs to be careful to use data that match the topic, in this case VDOE data.

          • Well , after three posts of the data – you FINALLY answer!

            re: The vakids.org data is for all children in the state, not just those in the public schools. Its definition of economically disadvantaged is children living below 200% of poverty level.

            Somehow – you’ll have to convince me that most of the kids in the state are not also in public school or even that a subset of them won’t have consistent statistics that are fairly representative.

            Your point about the 200% versus school criteria – again – maybe different but probably close.

            But I ding you for not showing the actually data you extracted as well as how you set the parameters in build-a-table.

            I am unable to duplicate what you did and no this is not about not knowing statistics – it’s about using a tool in a way that another person does not understand what you did .

            AND I have asked you to provide ALL the demographic percentages so we CAN compare Asians to Black percentages.

            Finally – the point made originally BY ME was that Asians have not suffered discrimination on the level of blacks and you used economically disadvantaged as a proxy – and that’s okay as long as you truly support that premise which you have not – you’ve only shown the percent of Asians and not a comparison between Asians and blacks.

            The data I got shows that Asians in Virginia have the lowest percentage of economically disadvantaged.

            How about you show a similar list from VDOE ?

            I’ve tried – different settings and I cannot get just a simple list of that data – but my bet is that it’s not that different from the data I provided – i.e. that Asians have the lowest percentage of economically disadvantaged and half or lower than blacks.

          • Three things, Larry:
            1. Not my job to answer your questions, so I won’t any more
            2. “Somehow – you’ll have to convince me that most of the kids in the state are not also in public school or even that a subset of them won’t have consistent statistics that are fairly representative.”
            You demand someone convince you. No one could convince you it is Friday.
            3. You think you will get “consistent statistics” with different populations and different data definitions. God bless you Larry, but you know nothing whatever about statistics.
            Goodbye.

  8. Of course, you’re assuming that this will in some way actually perc into the classroom rather than be more than just a five-finger exercise at the levels of sections A through E for a decade or more.

    Proof of the pudding and all is the praise and honors for the non-participants.

  9. Got a few different narratives going on here.

    Seems like the public schools can create successful students with Masters Degrees as long as they have capable parents who can help their kids.

    Here’s what Reading SOLs look like at VB:

    Virginia Beach Black SOL English Reading 72.35
    Virginia Beach White SOL English Reading 90.58

    • Perhaps they can meet in the middle. That is snark.

      Truth is, the longer the online teaching goes on, the bigger that gap will get – if SOLs are ever administered again. Doing away with standardized tests will prove the ultimate goal. Then “equitable” classroom grades will achieve the goals.

      Everyone gets a trophy.

  10. And how many more votes for Donald Trump in Virginia Beach?

  11. Parents should raise the issue 0f other subjects beyond reading, writing and arithmetic. Art, music, drama, phys ed and sports. Dollars to doughnuts that the [email protected] superintendent and school board members didn’t think that far. Harass the hell out of them.

    One secret weapon – Asian moms. I’ve seen them in action in public meetings.

    • Yeah, so have I. What’s an Asian language word for “helicopter”?

      Actually, only one. Girl in my daughter’s class. The kids liked her and tried to socialize with her. No luck, no time She graduated 2nd in a class of 400, totally unsocialized.

      At some point, it borders on abuse.

      • The old “Asian girl” story, huh. Glad I didn’t tell one like that. Good thing that current critical race theory puts Asians in the majority or their dogma would have a massive hole in it.

        • In this case, very true. As a Junior, her mother used to walk her from the car into the school every morning. I used to drop my daughter off on the way to work. I watched her do it every morning. Mom walked into the school with her every morning.

          According to my daughter, her mother was waiting at the door every afternoon.

          Asian? Or just plain overprotective? But it did fit the stereotype to the extreme.

          • The first rule of holes applies.

          • Oh hell no. I gotta dig this one a whole lot deeper. All these kids were friends. My daughter was #14 and the rest of her clique included 2 above that and some 5 or 6 below but all in the top 10%.

            But her bestie was #1. She still is her oldest best friend. They get together every couple of months.

            Now her friend was the valedictorian…. and Jewish. Wow, helicopters! Mom was an engineer and dad was a psychiatrist. Every single homework assignment was checked, edited, corrected, and rewritten. Worked. She went through Med School and got her MD.

            But completely broke with the Jewish mother stereotype. Instead of finding a doctor to marry her daughter, she made one of her daughter.

        • BTW, they say you don’t regret what you do, but what you don’t do. I drove my daughter to high school only the one year. Those 15 minutes were the best. I regret that I could have done that the previous year too.

      • Sorry but that’s classic racist commentary. Attempting to extrapolate a single data point to impugn an entire race. A la Willy Horton. Also, the use of undefined negative attributes – namely “unsocialized”. Back in the bad old days I guess “shiftless” was the choice of racists.

        I wonder how long it would take the left to go anti-Asian-American given the success of that ethnic group lays waste to the “white privilege” thesis.

        • Oh hell it was just a story. As I said, “stereotyping? Hell yes.”

          The fact that she was Asian was secondary to the extreme overprotective behavior.

          Here’s some sexism to throw in. The whole front row of graduates was nearly all female. Maybe 25 to 5.

          • Reed Fawell 3rd

            Imagine, today there are tens of thousands of people just like Nancy_Naive “educating” and posing as “roll models” for our kids in schools, colleges, and universities all over the nation. This abomination has been going since the 1970s, poisoning and ruining generations of kids.

          • Nah, this abomination has only been poisoning minds since 1981. In the 70s, this abomination was still in graduate school.

          • yah….but PW is going to rename Jeff Davis to Richmond Highway, no?

        • A road trip along US-11 in Vuh-gin-yuh ought to lay waste to the “white privilege” thesis.

          • are you thinking they did not have “separate but equal” schools in southwest Virginia where the black kids got even less education than the whites – maybe?

        • I suspect that the were schools were separate but equally bad. Many of the counties in that area don’t have a real big black population today, and likely never did. Page county, for example, is 2% black.

          And is where I was asked by someone suffering from an excess of “white privilege” to borrow $100. Which I’m sure, had I given it to him, would have been spent on booze or drugs.

        • They are already there, D.J. See Ivy League schools in court defending Asian student quotas, in that case maximum limits on the number of Asians admitted.

          “A 2013 analysis by Harvard, later cited in a lawsuit, examined admissions data to see what would happen if admissions officers judged students only by academic achievements and test scores. Under such a standard, the analysis found, Asian Americans would make up 43.4% of the admitted class, compared to their actual 18.7% share. Even when all an applicants’ attributes were considered — extracurricular activities, personal ratings, etc. — Asians were still found to be sorely underadmitted.” https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2019-10-03/harvard-ruling-asian-american-college-admissions-ivy-league-affirmative-action

          So Nancy is running with the “best” pack. Cocktails at 7. Dinner at 8. White tie. Silverware from outside to inside. Anti-Asian American stories required (they are so not like us). No laughing with food in the mouth.

          • Just want to point out that there are a lot of private schools that will take you in a heartbeat no matter your academic record.
            In fact, they’ll take you and promise your parents that they’ll “graduate” you.

            And of course, no complaints here about student athletes who can’t even read at a high school level. Nope. No problem taking them over “qualified” Asians..

    • From the draft policy:

      “Virginia Beach City Public Schools is committed to establishing and sustaining an equitable community that exemplifies the School Division’s core values and equity mission to end the predictive value of race, ethnicity, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation/gender identity, pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, age, marital status, disability and to ensure each member of the school community’s success.”

      So, there will need to be a massive spreadsheet, updated at least weekly. That “Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion” job doesn’t seem so easy now, does it?

      • Ah, but read it again…

        “Virginia Beach City Public Schools is committed to establishing and sustaining an equitable community that exemplifies the School Division’s core values and equity mission…”

        Uh yep, that says, “We’re going to create a spreadsheet…”

        “… to end the predictive value of race, ethnicity, color…”

        “…, and then we’re gonna delete it.”

      • “…end the predictive value of race, ethnicity, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation/gender identity, pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, age, marital status, disability…”

        Can somebody tell me what this even means? Has someone invented a new definition of predictive value?

  12. The Woke educators may be creating a new cottage industry for plaintiff’s lawyers, Section 1983 class actions against school districts and school board members.

  13. If bad parents are the reason kids “fail” in the public schools, tell me again how the non-public private schools would fix that?

    • Well, for starters, if we had all vouchers, schools would concentrate on hiring employees who work to educate kids instead of generally worthless bureaucrats whose main goal is protecting their jobs. Perhaps, firing a few hundred bureaucrats and hiring a few phonics and arithmetic teachers for the early grades might actually help some of these kids.

      • Well, no not Conservative theories. and mythology.. sorry…

        I know the Success Academy in NY seems to be successful BUT one of it’s core tenets is that parents must be involved so it kind of negates the whole premise.

        In other words, they’re only admitting the kids whose parents ARE involved.

        re: ” Well, for starters, if we had all vouchers, schools would concentrate on hiring employees who work to educate kids instead of generally worthless bureaucrats whose main goal is protecting their jobs. ”

        You mean like the teachers in the public schools right now who do, very successfully teach the kids of “involved” parents – well ?

        They must be good teachers if the kids of “good” parents get good grades and go on to get masters degrees and such, right?

        • We have a basic disagreement on a fundamental issue the obligation of the public through the school system. I believe that schools need to make strong, but reasonable, efforts to educate children, with a reasonable effort to provide more resources to kids with additional needs. But there must be corresponding effort by the student to learn. When this is done. I’m willing to accept that fact that some kids simply won’t be educated. Schools can do a lot but they cannot make up for bad homes. And I’m willing to accept that because nothing else is reasonably possible without destroying the education of the rest of the kids.

          As I understand your position, there is essentially no limit to the amount of resources that must be devoted to kids and that society needs to fix the bad parent situation somehow.

          Most school systems make huge expenditures of time and money, probably beyond the scope of fairness to other children and other local government needs, to address those kids who don’t and won’t cooperate. That’s more than enough. Some people will fail and sometimes because of the immediate source of their DNA. When a fair effort has been made, this is an acceptable result.

          • Well first, I do think there are limts on resources and I do think some kids won’t make it.

            But we’re talking about a LOT of kids, not a few and if you say you’re worried about resources, are you also worried about the cost of entitlements?

            Why do we have “bad kids” and “bad parents” and other countries beat our socks off academically – with LESS money?

            When you look at a school system like Fairfax and the SOL reading scores vary by school from 50 – 90 – are you saying the ones at 50 are justified because if we try to spend more resources on them it will hurt those at 90?

            You’re okay with sending the 50 into adult life and pay for their food, shelter and health care instead?

            Your position just leads to further failure – and higher costs to you. But you support it anyhow?

            How can kids of parents who are poorly educated get help if their parents also lack decent educations? Do you just blame the parents anyhow and tell the kid “tough luck” dude – you got bad parents even if you have a normal IQ?

            Finally – if this happens in public schools right now – where they already teach phonics and other and actually produce good results – what would the private schools do different?

            And you don’t support the same level of transparency and accountability for those private schools?

            See, this sounds more like standard Conservative Dogma than a real solution.

          • Larry, in Fairfax County, we spend buckets of extra money on low-income kids and schools. These schools have class sizes in the teens; other schools have class sizes in the middle 20s for the same grade level. Some 5th and 6th grade classes are over 30. Low-income kids and schools have extra reading and math teachers, extra classroom aides, extra counselors, extra nurses, extra psychologists.

            But it’s never enough. Spend more and require nothing in return.

            We need more shame in society. People who fail their kids need to be shamed. Worthless politicians and government employees who nurture bad behavior need to be shamed.

            And I’ll believe the public school districts when they fire a significant number of non-teaching and non-school-based staff and put the money in classrooms.

          • TMT – Henrico has the same issue as Fairfax. In fact, many places do – even places that are not rich like Fairfax.

            As I have said many times before, I have no problem using tax money for non-public schools as long as they:

            1. – take the kids that are the problem – the ones the public schools are failing at – not turn them into de-facto private schools for upper income folks whose kids don’t have problems.

            2. – that they compete on equal terms in terms of academic performance transparency and accountability.

            In other words, I’m looking for solutions – not to affix blame and walk away – which means all that money you’re worried about in Fairfax is going to translate into taxes you’ll pay for entitlements.

            It’s a tough problem – but if you’re actually worried about money – the schools are a drop in the bucket compared to later on when uneducated are paid for by your taxes.

            got a solution ? or just more blame?

          • The public school efforts to educate “at risk” students reminds me of the tactics of Major General Burnside at 1st Fredericksburg. He sent wave after wave of Union troops at the Confederates at Marye’s Heights, only to fail over and over again.

            It’s job protection for teachers union employees, managed by duffuses with Ph.Ds and Ed.Ds. But the sentiment, fueled by union campaign contributions, is more of the same. I think a solution would be to give vouchers to parents/guardians of kids coming with families with income $40 K or less, spendable at any school. The schools would have to take all-comers to qualify for money. Statewide standard tests would apply to students at all schools, including public schools, that take money.

          • Like poverty – attempts to address it are not wholly successful but it’s a mistake to say there has been no progress.

            It’s a stubborn problem that probably will never be “fixed” no more than crime is or traffic congestion.

            That’s the problem we have. We look at some issues with a black/white/win/lose perspective.

            If we rated VDOT the way we rate public schools – We’d call them a failure also – in fact, others here do.

            You can’t have neighborhoods the way we and schools associated with the neighborhoods without basically creating neighborhood versions of city ghettos.

            You put a bunch of undereducated and low income people in one neighborhood and they all send their kids to the same neighborhood school – you’ll get SOL scores of 50 while upscale neighborhoods with college-educated parents will get SOLS of 90.

            You can go to a blame game and walk away or you can try to deal with the issue – and yes – there will be more failures – it’s a hard nut to crack.

            It’s easy to say that “all” school administrators are – then list out all your pejoratives including “woke” but all that does is reveal the cynical nature of folks who really haveno clue what to do other than just blame and walk away.

            We get post and post here on BR that essentially says just that.

            Then the same folks cry about the cost of entitlements… and they don’t actually say it – that would be horribly politically incorrect but in their heart of hearts – they’d cut the entitlements because poor folks “deserve it” for being poor in the first place.

  14. Sounds like someone needs to run for School Board, Mr. Sherlock!! I heard they pay well.

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